• By using polarized inelastic neutron scattering measurements, we show that the spin-lattice quantum entanglement in mutliferroics results in hybrid elementary excitations, involving spin and lattice degrees of freedom. These excitations can be considered as multiferroic Godstone modes. We argue that the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction could be at the origin of this hybridization.
  • We report a study of spin waves in hole-doped ferromagnetic La7/8Sr1/8MnO3, in the metallic state (165K) below TC (181K) and through the puzzling metal-insulator transition which occurs at TO'O''=159K. They reveal very unusual excitations. Propagating spin waves are observed in the small q-range up to q=0.25 (lambda=4a), and, beyond, four dispersionless levels. Both types of excitations have a quasi two-dimensional (2D) character. The transition is revealed by a folding of the dispersed magnon branch at q=1/8. In the metallic state, the dispersionless levels reveal ferromagnetic domains with 4 lattice spacings for their size along a and b. They lead to a picture of charge segregation with hole-poor domains surrounded with hole-rich paths. Within this description, the transition appears as the ordering of domains, which can be interpreted in terms of a 2D superstructure of orthogonal stripes.
  • We report a study of spin-waves in ferromagnetic La$_{1-x}$Ca$_{x}$MnO$_3$, at concentrations x=0.17 and x=0.2 very close to the metallic transition (x=0.225). Below T$_C$, in the quasi-metallic state (T=150K), nearly q-independent energy levels are observed. They are characteristic of standing spin waves confined into finite-size ferromagnetic domains, defined in {\bf a, b) plane for x=0.17 and in all q-directions for x=0.2. They allow an estimation of the domain size, a few lattice spacings, and of the magnetic coupling constants inside the domains. These constants, anisotropic, are typical of an orbital-ordered state, allowing to characterize the domains as "hole-poor". The precursor state of the CMR metallic phase appears, therefore, as an assembly of small orbital-ordered domains.
  • The study of strong electron correlations in transition metal oxides with modern microscopy and diffraction techniques unveiled a fascinating world of nanosize textures in the spin, charge, and crystal structure. Examples range from high $T_c$ superconducting cuprates and nickelates, to hole doped manganites and cobaltites. However, in many cases the appearance of these textures is accompanied with "glassiness" and multiscale/multiphase effects, which complicate significantly their experimental verification. Here, we demonstrate how nuclear magnetic resonance may be uniquely used to probe nanosize orbital textures in magnetic transition metal oxides. As a convincing example we show for the first time the detection of nanoscale orbital phase separation in the ground state of the ferromagnetic insulator La$_{0.875}$Sr$_{0.125}$MnO$_3$.
  • Using elastic neutron scattering, we evidence a commensurate antiferromagnetic Cu(2) order (AF) in the superconducting (SC) high-$\rm T_c$ cuprate $\rm YBa_2(Cu_{1-y}Co_y)_3O_{7+\delta}$ (y=0.013, $\rm T_c$=93 K). As in the Co-free system, the spin excitation spectrum is dominated by a magnetic resonance peak at 41 meV but with a reduced spectral weight. The substitution of Co thus leads to a state where AF and SC cohabit showing that the CuO$_2$ plane is a highly antiferromagnetically polarizable medium even for a sample where T$_c$ remains optimum.
  • We present a study of a microtwinned single crystal of LaMnO$_3$ by means of implanted muons. Two muon stopping sites are identified from the symmetry of the internal field in the ordered phase. The temperature dependence of these fields yields the behavior of the staggered magnetization from which a static critical exponent ($\beta=0.36(2)$) is extracted and discussed. The muon spin-spin relaxation rate shows a critical slowing down (contrary to preliminary findings) with a critical exponent $n=0.7(1)$, witnessing the Ising nature of the dynamic fluctuations. The muon precession frequencies vs. applied magnetic field reveal the saturation of the weak ferromagnetic domain structure originated by the Dzialoshinski-Moriya antisymmetric exchange.
  • Original paper from Mirebeau et al. PRL 83, 628, 1999 Comment from W. Bao et al (cond-mat/0008042, 2 Aug 2000 submitted to PRL, updated on 1 sep 2000
  • Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments have been performed in a La$_{0.94}$Sr$_{0.06}$MnO$_3$ untwinned crystal, which exhibits an antiferromagnetic canted magnetic structure with ferromagnetic layers. The elastic small q scattering exhibits a modulation with an anisotropic q-dependence. It can be pictured by ferromagnetic inhomogeneities or polarons with a platelike shape, the largest size ($\approx17\AA$) and largest inter-polaron distance ($\approx$ 38$\AA$) being within the ferromagnetic layers. Comparison with observations performed on Ca-doped samples, which show the growth of the magnetic polarons with doping, suggests that this growth is faster for the Sr than for the Ca substitution. Below the gap of the spin wave branch typical of the AF layered magnetic structure, an additional spin wave branch reveals a ferromagnetic and isotropic coupling, already found in Ca-doped samples. Its q-dependent intensity, very anisotropic, closely reflects the ferromagnetic correlations found for the static clusters. All these results agree with a two-phase electronic segregation occurring on a very small scale, although some characteristics of a canted state are also observed suggesting a weakly inhomogeneous state.
  • Elastic neutron scattering experiments performed in semi-conducting La(1-x)Ca(x)MnO3 single crystals (x=0.05, 0.08), reveal new features in the problem of electronic phase separation and metal insulator transition. Below TN, the observation of a broad magnetic modulation in the q-dependent scattering intensity, centered at nearly identical qm whatever the q direction, can be explained by a liquid-like spatial distribution of similar magnetic droplets. A semi-quantitative description of their magnetic state, diameter, and average distance, can be done using a two-phase model. Such a picture can explain the anomalous characteristics of the spin wave branches and may result from unmixing forces between charge carriers predicted from the s-d model.