• We report the discovery of two hot Jupiters orbiting the stars EPIC229426032 and EPIC246067459. We used photometry data from Campaign 11 and 12 of the Kepler (K2) Mission, as well as radial velocity data obtained using the HARPS, FEROS, and CORALIE spectrographs. EPIC229426032 b and EPIC246067459 b have masses of $1.36^{+0.10}_{-0.10}$ and $0.86^{+0.13}_{-0.12}\,R_{\mathrm{Jup}}$, radii of $1.63^{+0.07}_{-0.08}$ and $1.30^{+0.15}_{-0.14}\,M_{\mathrm{Jup}}$, and are orbiting their host stars in 2.18 and 3.2 day orbits, respectively. The large radius of EPIC229426032 b leads us to conclude that this corresponds to a highly inflated hot Jupiter. EPIC2460674559 b has a radius consistent with theoretical models, considering the high incident flux falling on the planet. Both of these discoveries represent excellent laboratories to study the physics of planetary atmospheres, and the factors playing a role in planetary infation, as well as planet formation and evolution. EPIC229426032 b is particularly favourable for follow-up studies, since not only is it very inflated, but it also orbits a relatively bright star ($V = 11.6$).
  • Although the majority of radial velocity detected planets have been found orbiting solar-type stars, a fraction of them have been discovered around giant stars. These planetary systems have revealed different orbital properties when compared to solar-type stars companions. In particular, radial velocity surveys have shown that there is a lack of giant planets in close-in orbits around giant stars, in contrast to the known population of hot-Jupiters orbiting solar-type stars. The reason of this distinctive feature in the semimajor-axis distribution has been theorized to be the result of the stellar evolution and/or due to the effect of a different formation/evolution scenario for planets around intermediate-mass stars. However, in the past few years, a handful of transiting short-period planets (P$\lesssim$ 10 days) have been found around giant stars, thanks to the high precision photometric data obtained initially by the Kepler mission, and later by its two-wheels extension K2. These new discoveries, have allowed us for the first time to study the orbital properties and physical parameters of these intriguing and elusive sub-stellar companions. In this paper we report on an independent discovery of a transiting planet in field 10 of the K2 mission, also reported recently by Grunblatt et al. (2017). The main orbital parameters of EPIC\,228754001\,$b$, obtained with all the available data for the system, are the following: $P$ = 9.1708 $\pm$ 0.0025 $d$, $e$ = 0.290 $\pm$ 0.049, Mp = 0.495 $\pm$ 0.007 Mjup \,and Rp = 1.089 $\pm$ 0.006 Rjup. This is the fifth known planet orbiting any giant star with $a < 0.1$, and the most eccentric one among them, making EPIC\,228754001\,$b$ a very interesting object.
  • We report the discovery of a substellar companion around the giant star HIP67537. Based on precision radial velocity measurements from CHIRON and FEROS high-resolution spectroscopic data, we derived the following orbital elements for HIP67537$\,b$: m$_b$sin$i$ = 11.1$^{+0.4}_{-1.1}$ M$_{\rm {\tiny jup}}$, $a$ = 4.9$^{+0.14}_{-0.13}$ AU and $e$ = 0.59$^{+0.05}_{-0.02}$. Considering random inclination angles, this object has $\gtrsim$ 65% probability to be above the theoretical deuterium-burning limit, thus it is one of the few known objects in the planet to brown-dwarf transition region. In addition, we analyzed the Hipparcos astrometric data of this star, from which we derived a minimum inclination angle for the companion of $\sim$ 2 deg. This value corresponds to an upper mass limit of $\sim$ 0.3 M$_\odot$, therefore the probability that HIP67537$\,b$ is stellar in nature is $\lesssim$ 7%. The large mass of the host star and the high orbital eccentricity makes HIP67537$\,b$ a very interesting and rare substellar object. This is the second candidate companion in the brown dwarf desert detected in the sample of intermediate-mass stars targeted by the EXPRESS radial velocity program, which corresponds to a detection fraction of $f$ = 1.6$^{+2.0}_{-0.5}$%. This value is larger than the fraction observed in solar-type stars, providing new observational evidence of an enhanced formation efficiency of massive substellar companions in massive disks. Finally, we speculate about different formation channels for this object.
  • CONTEXT. Exoplanet searches have demonstrated that giant planets are preferentially found around metal-rich stars and that their fraction increases with the stellar mass. AIMS. During the past six years, we have conducted a radial velocity follow-up program of 166 giant stars, to detect substellar companions, and characterizing their orbital properties. Using this information, we aim to study the role of the stellar evolution in the orbital parameters of the companions, and to unveil possible correlations between the stellar properties and the occurrence rate of giant planets. METHODS. Using FEROS and CHIRON spectra, we have computed precision radial velocities and we have derived atmospheric and physical parameters for all of our targets. Additionally, velocities computed from UCLES spectra are presented here. By studying the periodic radial velocity signals, we have detected the presence of several substellar companions. RESULTS. We present four new planetary systems around the giant stars HIP8541, HIP74890, HIP84056 and HIP95124. Additionally, we find that giant planets are more frequent around metal-rich stars, reaching a peak in the detection of $f$ = 16.7$^{+15.5}_{-5.9}$% around stars with [Fe/H] $\sim$ 0.35 dex. Similarly, we observe a positive correlation of the planet occurrence rate with the stellar mass, between M$_\star$ $\sim$ 1.0 -2.1 M$_\odot$, with a maximum of $f$ = 13.0$^{+10.1}_{-4.2}$%, at M$_\star$ = 2.1 M$_\odot$. CONCLUSIONS. We conclude that giant planets are preferentially formed around metal-rich stars. Also, we conclude that they are more efficiently formed around more massive stars, in the mass range of M$_\star$ $\sim$ 1.0 - 2.1 M$_\odot$. These observational results confirm previous findings for solar-type and post-MS hosting stars, and provide further support to the core-accretion formation model.
  • Precision radial velocities are required to discover and characterize planets orbiting nearby stars. Optical and near infrared spectra that exhibit many hundreds of absorption lines can allow the m/s precision levels required for such work. However, this means that studies have generally focused on solar-type dwarf stars. After the main-sequence, intermediate-mass stars (former A-F stars) expand and rotate slower than their progenitors, thus thousands of narrow absorption lines appear in the optical region, permitting the search for planetary Doppler signals in the data for these types of stars. We present the discovery of two giant planets around the intermediate-mass evolved star HIP65891 and HIP107773. The best Keplerian fit to the HIP65891 and HIP107773 radial velocities leads to the following orbital parameters: P=1084.5 d; m$_b$sin$i$ = 6.0 M$_{jup}$; $e$=0.13 and P=144.3 d; m$_b$sin$i$ = 2.0 M$_{jup}$; $e$=0.09, respectively. In addition, we confirm the planetary nature of the outer object orbiting the giant star HIP67851. The orbital parameters of HIP67851c are: P=2131.8 d, m$_c$sin$i$ = 6.0 M$_{jup}$ and $e$=0.17. With masses of 2.5 M$_\odot$ and 2.4 M$_\odot$ HIP65891 and HIP107773 are two of the most massive stars known to host planets. Additionally, HIP67851 is one of five giant stars that are known to host a planetary system having a close-in planet ($a <$ 0.7 AU). Based on the evolutionary states of those five stars, we conclude that close-in planets do exist in multiple systems around subgiants and slightly evolved giants stars, but probably they are subsequently destroyed by the stellar envelope during the ascent of the red giant branch phase. As a consequence, planetary systems with close-in objects are not found around horizontal branch stars.
  • A recent reanalysis of archival data has lead several authors to arrive at strikingly different conclusions for a number of planet-hosting candidate stars. In particular, some radial velocities measured using FEROS spectra have been shown to be inaccurate, throwing some doubt on the validity of a number of planet detections. Motivated by these results, we have begun the Reanalysis of Archival FEROS specTra (RAFT) program and here we discuss the first results from this work. We have reanalyzed FEROS data for the stars HD 11977, HD 47536, HD 70573, HD 110014 and HD 122430, all of which are claimed to have at least one planetary companion. We have reduced the raw data and computed the radial velocity variations of these stars, achieving a long-term precision of $\sim$ 10 m/s on the known stable star tau Ceti, and in good agreement with the residuals to our fits. We confirm the existence of planets around HD 11977, HD 47536 and HD 110014, but with different orbital parameters than those previously published. In addition, we found no evidence of the second planet candidate around HD 47536, nor any companions orbiting HD 122430 and HD 70573. Finally, we report the discovery of a second planet around HD 110014, with a minimum mass of 3.1 Mjup and a orbital period of 130 days. Analysis of activity indicators allow us to confirm the reality of our results and also to measure the impact of magnetic activity on our radial velocity measurements. These results confirm that very metal-poor stars down to [Fe/H]$\sim$ -0.7 dex, can indeed form giant planets given the right conditions.
  • Context: So far more than 60 substellar companions have been discovered around giant stars. These systems present physical and orbital properties that contrast to those detected orbiting less evolved stars. Aims: We are conducting a radial velocity survey of 166 bright giant stars in the southern hemisphere. The main goals of our project are to detect and characterize planets in close-in orbits around giant stars in order to study the effects of the host star evolution on their orbital and physical properties. Methods: We have obtained precision radial velocities for the giant stars HIP67851 and HIP97233 that have revealed periodic signals, which are most likely induced by the presence of substellar companions. Results: We present the discovery of a planetary system and an eccentric brown dwarf orbiting the giant stars HIP67851 and HIP97233, respectively. The inner planet around HIP67851 has a period of 88.8 days, a projected mass of 1.4 Mjup and an eccentricity of 0.09. After Kepler 91b, HIP67851b is the closest-in known planet orbiting a giant star. Although the orbit of the outer object is not fully constrained, it is likely a super-Jupiter. The brown dwarf around HIP97233 has an orbital period of 1058.8 days, a minimum mass of 20.0 Mjup and an eccentricity of 0.61. This is the most eccentric known brown dwarf around a giant star.
  • Context: More than 50 exoplanets have been found around giant stars, revealing different properties when compared to planets orbiting solar-type stars. In particular, they are Super-Jupiters and are not found orbiting interior to $\sim$ 0.5 AU. Aims: We are conducting a radial velocity study of a sample of 166 giant stars aimed at studying the population of close-in planets orbiting giant stars and how their orbital and physical properties are influenced by the post-MS evolution of the host star. Methods: We have collected multi epochs spectra for all of the targets in our sample. We have computed precision radial velocities from FECH/CHIRON and FEROS spectra, using the I$_2$ cell technique and the simultaneous calibration method, respectively. Results: We present the discovery of a massive planet around the giant star HIP105854. The best Keplerian fit to the data leads to an orbital distance of 0.81 $\pm$ 0.03 AU, an eccentricity of 0.02 $\pm$ 0.03 and a projected mass of 8.2 $\pm$ 0.2 \mjup. With the addition of this new planet discovery, we performed a detailed analysis of the orbital properties and mass distribution of the planets orbiting giant stars. We show that there is an overabundance of planets around giant stars with $a \sim$ 0.5-0.9 AU, which might be attributed to tidal decay. Additionally, these planets are significantly more massive than those around MS and subgiant stars, suggesting that they grow via accretion either from the stellar wind or by mass transfer from the host star. Finally, we show that planets around evolved stars have lower orbital eccentricities than those orbiting solar-type stars, which suggests that they are either formed in different conditions or that their orbits are efficiently circularized by interactions with the host star.
  • CONTEXT: The recent discovery of three giant planets orbiting the extremely metal-poor stars HIP11952 and HIP13044 have challenged theoretical predictions of the core-accretion model. According to this, the metal content of the protoplanetary disk from which giant planets are formed is a key ingredient for the early formation of planetesimals prior to the runaway accretion of the surrounding gas. AIMS: We reanalyzed the original FEROS data that were used to detect the planets to prove or refute their existence, employing our new reduction and analysis methods. METHOD: We applied the cross-correlation technique to FEROS spectra to measure the radial velocity variation of HIP13044 and HIP11952. We reached a typical precision of $\sim$ 35 $ms^{-1}$ for HIP13044 and $\sim$ 25 $ms^{-1}$ for HIP11952, which is significantly superior to the uncertainties presented previously. RESULTS: We found no evidence of the planet orbiting the metal-poor extragalactic star HIP13044. We show that given our radial velocity precision, and considering the large number of radial velocity epochs, the probability for a non-detection of the radial velocity signal recently claimed is lower than 10$^{-4}$. Finally, we also confirm findings that the extremely metal-poor star HIP11952 does not contain a system of two gas giant planets. These results reaffirm the expectations from the core-accretion model of planet formation.
  • Context: To date, more than 30 planets have been discovered around giant stars, but only one of them has been found to be orbiting within 0.6 AU from the host star, in direct contrast to what is observed for FGK dwarfs. This result suggests that evolved stars destroy/engulf close-in planets during the red giant phase. Aims: We are conducting a radial velocity survey of 164 bright G and K giant stars in the southern hemisphere with the aim of studying the effect of the host star evolution on the inner structure of planetary systems. In this paper we present the spectroscopic atmospheric parameters (\Teff, \logg, $\xi$, [Fe/H]) and the physical properties (mass, radius, evolutionary status) of the program stars. In addition, rotational velocities for all of our targets were derived. Methods: We used high resolution and high S/N spectra to measure the equivalent widths of many Fe{\sc\,i} and Fe{\sc\,ii} lines, which were used to derive the atmospheric parameters by imposing local thermodynamic and ionization equilibrium. The effective temperatures and metallicities were used, along with stellar evolutionary tracks to determine the physical properties and evolutionary status of each star. Results: We found that our targets are on average metal rich and they have masses between $\sim$\,1.0\,M$_\odot$ and 3.5\,M$_\odot$. In addition, we found that 122 of our targets are ascending the RGB, while 42 of them are on the HB phase.
  • We use early-time photometry and spectroscopy of 12 Type II plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) to derive their distances using the expanding photosphere method (EPM). We perform this study using two sets of Type II supernova (SN II) atmosphere models, three filter subsets ($\{BV\}$, $\{BVI\}$, $\{VI\}$), and two methods for the host-galaxy extinction, which leads to 12 Hubble diagrams. We find that systematic differences in the atmosphere models lead to $\sim $50% differences in the EPM distances and to a value of ${\rm H_0}$ between 52 and 101 ${\rm km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}}$. Using the $\{VI\}$ filter subset we obtain the lowest dispersion in the Hubble diagram, {${\rm \sigma_{\mu} = 0.32}$ mag}. We also apply the EPM analysis to the well-observed SN IIP 1999em. With the $\{VI\}$ filter subset we derive a distance ranging from 9.3 $\pm$ 0.5 Mpc to 13.9 $\pm$ 1.4 Mpc depending on the atmosphere model employed.