• We aim at constraining the angular momentum evolution of low mass stars by measuring their rotation rates when they begin to evolve freely towards the ZAMS, i.e. after the disk accretion phase has stopped. We conducted a multi-site photometric monitoring of the young open cluster h Persei that has an age of ~13 Myr. The observations were done in the I-band using 4 different telescopes and the variability study is sensitive to periods from less than 0.2 day to 20 days. Rotation periods are derived for 586 candidate cluster members over the mass range 0.4<=M/Msun<=1.4. The rotation period distribution indicates a sligthly higher fraction of fast rotators for the lower mass objects, although the lower and upper envelopes of the rotation period distribution, located respectively at ~0.2-0.3d and ~10d, are remarkably flat over the whole mass range. We combine this period distribution with previous results obtained in younger and older clusters to model the angular momentum evolution of low mass stars during the PMS. The h Per cluster provides the first statistically robust estimate of the rotational period distribution of solar-type and lower mass stars at the end of the PMS accretion phase (>10 Myr). The results are consistent with models that assume significant core-envelope decoupling during the angular momentum evolution to the ZAMS.
  • We analyze the photometric and spectroscopic variability of the classical T Tauri star V2129 Oph over several rotational cycles to test the dynamical predictions of magnetospheric accretion models. The photometric variability and the radial velocity variations in the photospheric lines can be explained by rotational modulation due to cold spots, while the radial velocity variations of the He I (5876 \AA) line and the veiling variability are due to hot spot rotational modulation. The hot and cold spots are located at high latitudes and about the same phase, but the hot spot is expected to sit at the chromospheric level, while the cold spot is at the photospheric level. Using the dipole+octupole magnetic-field configuration previously proposed in the literature for the system, we compute 3D MHD magnetospheric simulations of the star-disk system. We use the simulation's density, velocity and scaled temperature structures as input to a radiative transfer code, from which we calculate theoretical line profiles at all rotational phases. The theoretical profiles tend to be narrower than the observed ones, but the qualitative behavior and the observed rotational modulation of the H\alpha and H\beta emission lines are well reproduced by the theoretical profiles. The spectroscopic and photometric variability observed in V2129 Oph support the general predictions of complex magnetospheric accretion models with non-axisymmetric, multipolar fields.
  • The energy injection model is usually proposed to interpret the shallow-decay phase in Swift GRB X-ray afterglows. However, very few GRBs have simultaneous signatures of energy injection in their optical and X-ray afterglows. Here, we report optical observations of GRB 090529A from 2000 sec to $\sim10^6$ sec after the burst, in which an achromatic decay is seen at both wavelengths. The optical light curve shows a decay from 0.37 to 0.99 with a break at $\sim10^5$ sec. In the same time interval, the decay indices of the X-ray light curve changed from 0.04 to 1.2. Comparing these values with the closure relations, the segment after 3$\times10^{4}$ sec is consistent with the prediction of the forward shock in an ISM medium without any energy injection. The shallow-decay phase between 2000 to 3$\times10^{4}$ sec could be due to the external shock in a wind-type-like medium with an energy injection under the condition of $\nu_o < \nu_c < \nu_x$. However, the constraint of the spectral region is not well consistent with the multi-band observations. For this shallow-decay phase, other models are also possible, such as energy injection with evolving microphysical parameters, or a jet viewed off-axis,etc.
  • We present accurate time delays for the quadruply imaged quasar HE 0435-1223. The delays were measured from 575 independent photometric points obtained in the R-band between January 2004 and March 2010. With seven years of data, we clearly show that quasar image A is affected by strong microlensing variations and that the time delays are best expressed relative to quasar image B. We measured Delta_t(BC) = 7.8+/-0.8 days, Delta_t(BD) = -6.5+/-0.7 days and Delta_t_CD = -14.3+/-0.8 days. We spacially deconvolved HST NICMOS2 F160W images to derive accurate astrometry of the quasar images and to infer the light profile of the lensing galaxy. We combined these images with a stellar population fitting of a deep VLT spectrum of the lensing galaxy to estimate the baryonic fraction, $f_b$, in the Einstein radius. We measured f_b = 0.65+0.13-0.10 if the lensing galaxy has a Salpeter IMF and f_b = 0.45+0.04-0.07 if it has a Kroupa IMF. The spectrum also allowed us to estimate the velocity dispersion of the lensing galaxy, sigma_ap = 222+/-34 km/s. We used f_b and sigma_ap to constrain an analytical model of the lensing galaxy composed of an Hernquist plus generalized NFW profile. We solve the Jeans equations numerically for the model and explored the parameter space under the additional requirement that the model must predict the correct astrometry for the quasar images. Given the current error bars on f_b and sigma_ap, we did not constrain H0 yet with high accuracy, i.e., we found a broad range of models with chi^2 < 1. However, narrowing this range is possible, provided a better velocity dispersion measurement becomes available. In addition, increasing the depth of the current HST imaging data of HE 0435-1223 will allow us to combine our constraints with lens reconstruction techniques that make use of the full Einstein ring that is visible in this object.
  • We present ground-based and HST optical observations of the optical transients (OTs) of long-duration Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) 060729 and 090618, both at a redshift of z = 0.54. For GRB 060729, bumps are seen in the optical light curves (LCs), and the late-time broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the OT resemble those of local type Ic supernovae (SNe). For GRB 090618, the dense sampling of our optical observations has allowed us to detect well-defined bumps in the optical LCs, as well as a change in colour, that are indicative of light coming from a core-collapse SN. The accompanying SNe for both events are individually compared with SN1998bw, a known GRB-supernova, and SN1994I, a typical type Ic supernova without a known GRB counterpart, and in both cases the brightness and temporal evolution more closely resemble SN1998bw. We also exploit our extensive optical and radio data for GRB 090618, as well as the publicly-available SWIFT -XRT data, and discuss the properties of the afterglow at early times. In the context of a simple jet-like model, the afterglow of GRB 090618 is best explained by the presence of a jet-break at t-to > 0.5 days. We then compare the rest-frame, peak V -band absolute magnitudes of all of the GRB and X-Ray Flash (XRF)-associated SNe with a large sample of local type Ibc SNe, concluding that, when host extinction is considered, the peak magnitudes of the GRB/XRF-SNe cannot be distinguished from the peak magnitudes of non-GRB/XRF SNe.
  • Aims: With this paper we want to investigate the highly variable afterglow light curve and environment of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060526 at $z=3.221$. Methods: We present one of the largest photometric datasets ever obtained for a GRB afterglow, consisting of multi-color photometric data from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. The data set contains 412 data points in total to which we add additional data from the literature. Furthermore, we present low-resolution high signal-to-noise spectra of the afterglow. The afterglow light curve is modeled with both an analytical model using broken power law fits and with a broad-band numerical model which includes energy injections. The absorption lines detected in the spectra are used to derive column densities using a multi-ion single-component curve-of-growth analysis from which we derive the metallicity of the host of GRB 060526. Results: The temporal behaviour of the afterglow follows a double broken power law with breaks at $t=0.090\pm0.005$ and $t=2.401\pm0.061$ days. It shows deviations from the smooth set of power laws that can be modeled by additional energy injections from the central engine, although some significant microvariability remains. The broadband spectral-energy distribution of the afterglow shows no significant extinction along the line of sight. The metallicity derived from \ion{S}{II} and \ion{Fe}{II} of [S/H] = --0.57 $\pm$0.25 and [Fe/H] = --1.09$\pm$0.24 is relatively high for a galaxy at that redshift but comparable to the metallicity of other GRB hosts at similar redshifts. At the position of the afterglow, no host is detected to F775W(AB) = 28.5 mag with the HST, implying an absolute magnitude of the host M(1500 \AA{})$>$--18.3 mag which is fainter than most long-duration hosts, although the GRB may be associated with a faint galaxy at a distance of 11 kpc.
  • We have gathered optical photometry data from the literature on a large sample of Swift-era gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows including GRBs up to September 2009, for a total of 76 GRBs, and present an additional three pre-Swift GRBs not included in an earlier sample. Furthermore, we publish 840 additional new photometry data points on a total of 42 GRB afterglows, including large data sets for GRBs 050319, 050408, 050802, 050820A, 050922C, 060418, 080413A and 080810. We analyzed the light curves of all GRBs in the sample and derived spectral energy distributions for the sample with the best data quality, allowing us to estimate the host galaxy extinction. We transformed the afterglow light curves into an extinction-corrected z=1 system and compared their luminosities with a sample of pre-Swift afterglows. The results of a former study, which showed that GRB afterglows clustered and exhibited a bimodal distribution in luminosity space, is weakened by the larger sample. We found that the luminosity distribution of the two afterglow samples (Swift-era and pre-Swift) are very similar, and that a subsample for which we were not able to estimate the extinction, which is fainter than the main sample, can be explained by assuming a moderate amount of line-of-sight host extinction. We derived bolometric isotropic energies for all GRBs in our sample, and found only a tentative correlation between the prompt energy release and the optical afterglow luminosity at one day after the GRB in the z=1 system. A comparative study of the optical luminosities of GRB afterglows with echelle spectra (which show a high number of foreground absorbing systems) and those without reveals no indication that the former are statistically significantly more luminous. (abridged)
  • We present optical photometry of the GRB 060912A afterglow obtained with ground-based telescopes, from about 100 sec after the GRB trigger till about 0.3 day later, supplemented with the Swift optical afterglow data released in its official website. The optical light curve (LC) displays a smooth single power-law decay throughout the observed epochs, with a power-law index of about -1 and no significant color evolution. This is in contrast to the X-ray LC which has a plateau phase between two normal power-law decays of a respective index of about -1 and -1.2. It is shown by our combined X-ray and optical data analysis that this asynchronous behavior is difficult to be reconciled with the standard afterglow theory and energy injection hypothesis. We also construct an optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution at about 700 sec after the GRB trigger. It displays a significant flux depression in the B-band, reminding us of the possibility of a host-galaxy (at z=0.937) 2175-A dust absorption similar to the one that characterizes the Milky Way extinction law. Such an identification, although being tentative, may be confirmed by our detailed analysis using both template extinction laws and the afterglow theory. So far the feature is reported in very few GRB afterglows. Most seem to have a host galaxy either unusually bright for a GRB, just like this one, or of an early type, supporting the general suggestion of an anti-correlation between the feature and star-forming activities.
  • In this work, we present the results obtained from a multi-wavelength campaign, as well as from the public Swift/BAT, XRT, and UVOT data of GRB 060111B for which a bright optical emission was measured with good temporal resolution during the prompt phase. We identified the host galaxy at R~25 mag; its featureless spectral continuum and brightness, as well as the non-detection of any associated supernova 16 days after the trigger and other independent redshift estimates, converge to z~1-2. From the analysis of the early afterglow SED, we find that non-negligible host galaxy dust extinction, in addition to the Galactic one, affects the observed flux in the optical regime. The extinction-corrected optical-to-gamma-ray spectral energy distribution during the prompt emission shows a flux density ratio $F_{\gamma}/F_{opt}$=0.01-0.0001 with spectral index $\beta_{\gamma,opt}> \beta_{\gamma}$, strongly suggesting a separate origin of the optical and gamma-ray components. This result is supported by the lack of correlated behavior in the prompt emission light curves observed in the two energy domains. The properties of the prompt optical emission observed during GRB 060111B favor interpretation of this optical light as radiation from the reverse shock in a thick shell limit and in the slow cooling regime. The expected peak flux is consistent with the observed one corrected for the host extinction, likely indicating that the starting time of the TAROT observations is very near to or coincident with the peak time. The estimated fireball initial Lorentz factor is >260-360 at z=1-2, similar to the Lorentz factors obtained from other GRBs. GRB 060111B is a rare, good test case of the reverse shock emission mechanism in both the X-ray and optical energy ranges.
  • We present observations of the afterglow of GRB 080319B at optical, mm and radio frequencies from a few hours to 67 days after the burst. Present observations along with other published multi-wavelength data have been used to study the light-curves and spectral energy distributions of the burst afterglow. The nature of this brightest cosmic explosion has been explored based on the observed properties and it's comparison with the afterglow models. Our results show that the observed features of the afterglow fits equally good with the Inter Stellar Matter and the Stellar Wind density profiles of the circum-burst medium. In case of both density profiles, location of the maximum synchrotron frequency $\nu_m$ is below optical and the value of cooling break frequency $\nu_c$ is below $X-$rays, $\sim 10^{4}$s after the burst. Also, the derived value of the Lorentz factor at the time of naked eye brightness is $\sim 300$ with the corresponding blast wave size of $\sim 10^{18}$ cm. The numerical fit to the multi-wavelength afterglow data constraints the values of physical parameters and the emission mechanism of the burst.
  • We present a comprehensive multiwavelength temporal and spectral analysis of the FRED GRB 070419A. The early-time emission in the $\gamma$-ray and X-ray bands can be explained by a central engine active for at least 250 s, while at late times the X-ray light curve displays a simple power-law decay. In contrast, the observed behaviour in the optical band is complex (from 10$^2$ up to 10$^6$ s). We investigate the light curve behaviour in the context of the standard forward/reverse shock model; associating the peak in the optical light curve at $\sim$450 s with the fireball deceleration time results in a Lorenz factor $\Gamma \approx 350$ at this time. In contrast, the shallow optical decay between 450 and 1500 s remains problematic, requiring a reverse shock component whose typical frequency is above the optical band at the optical peak time for it to be explained within the standard model. This predicts an increasing flux density for the forward shock component until t $\sim$ 4 $\times$ 10$^6$ s, inconsistent with the observed decay of the optical emission from t $\sim$ 10$^4$ s. A highly magnetized fireball is also ruled out due to unrealistic microphysic parameters and predicted light curve behaviour that is not observed. We conclude that a long-lived central engine with a finely tuned energy injection rate and a sudden cessation of the injection is required to create the observed light curves - consistent with the same conditions that are invoked to explain the plateau phase of canonical X-ray light curves of GRBs.
  • We present comprehensive photometric R-band observations of the fading optical afterglow of the X-Ray Flash XRF050824, from 11 minutes to 104 days after the burst. The R-band lightcurve of the afterglow resembles the lightcurves of long duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), i.e., a power-law albeit with a rather shallow slope of alpha=0.6. Our late R-band images reveal the host galaxy with a rest-frame B-band luminosity corresponding to roughly 0.5 Lstar. The star-formation rate as determined from the [O II] emission line luminosity is about 1.8 Msun per year. When accounting for the host contribution, the slope is alpha=0.65+-0.01 and a break in the lightcurve is also suggested. A potential lightcurve bump at 2 weeks can be interpreted as a supernova only if this is a supernova with a fast rise and a fast decay. However, the overall fit still show excess scatter in the lightcurve due to wiggles and bumps. The flat lightcurves in the optical and X-rays could be explained by a continuous energy injection scenario with an on-axis viewing angle and a wide jet opening angle (theta_j>10 deg). If the energy injections are episodic, this could potentially help explain the bumps and wiggles. Spectroscopy of the afterglow give a redshift of z=0.828+-0.005 from both absorption and emission lines. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of the afterglow has a power-law shape with slope beta=0.56+-0.04. This can be compared to the X-ray spectral index which is betaX=1.0+-0.1. The curvature of the SED constrain the dust reddening towards the burst to Av<0.5 mag. (abridged)
  • Aims: Our aim is to measure the time delay between the two gravitationally lensed images of the z = 1.547 quasar SDSS J1650+4251, in order to estimate the Hubble constant H_0. Methods: Our measurement is based on R-band light curves with 57 epochs obtained at Maidanak Observatory, in Uzbekistan, from May 2004 to September 2005. The photometry is performed using simultaneous deconvolution of the data, which provides the individual light curves of the otherwise blended quasar images. The time delay is determined from the light curves using two very different numerical techniques, i.e., polynomial fitting and direct cross-correlation. The time delay is converted into H_0 following analytical modeling of the potential well. Results: Our best estimate of the time delay is Dt = 49.5 +/- 1.9 days, i.e., we reach a 3.8% accuracy. The R-band flux ratio between the quasar images, corrected for the time delay and for slow microlensing, is F_A /F_B = 6.2 +/- 5%. Conclusions: The accuracy reached on the time delay allows us to discriminate well between families of lens models. As for most other multiply imaged quasars, only models of the lensing galaxy that have a de Vaucouleurs mass profile plus external shear give a Hubble constant compatible with the current most popular value (H_0 = 72 +/- 8 km s-1 Mpc-1). A more realistic singular isothermal sphere model plus external shear gives H_0 = 51.7 +4.0 -3.0 km s-1 Mpc-1.
  • Observations of the optical afterglow of GRB 041006 with the Kiso Observatory 1.05 m Schmidt telescope, the Lulin Observatory 1.0 m telescope and the Xinglong Observatory 0.6 m telescope. Three-bands (B, V and R) of photometric data points were obtained on 2004 October 6, 0.025-0.329 days after the burst. These very early multi band light curves imply the existence of a color dependent plateau phase. The B-band light curve shows a clear plateau at around 0.03 days after the burst. The R band light curve shows the hint of a plateau, or a possible slope change, at around 0.1 days after the burst. The overall behavior of these multi-band light curves may be interpreted in terms of the sum of two separate components, one showing a monotonic decay the other exhibiting a rising and a falling phase, as described by the standard afterglow model.
  • We present 5-35 $\mu$m spectra, taken with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope, of five FU Orionis objects: FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, BBW 76, and V346 Nor. All but V346 Nor reveal amorphous silicate grains in emission at 10 $\mu$m and 20 $\mu$m, and show water-vapor absorption bands at 5.8 and 6.8 $\mu$m and SiO or possibly methane absorption at 8 $\mu$m. These absorption features closely match these bands in model stellar photospheres -- signs of the gaseous photospheres of the inner regions of these objects' accretion disks. The continuum emission at 5-8 $\mu$m is also consistent with such disks, and, for FU Orionis and BBW 76, longer-wavelength emission may be fit by a model which includes moderate disk flaring. V1057 Cyg and V1515 Cyg have much more emission at longer wavelengths than the others, perhaps evidence of substantial remnant of their natal, infalling envelopes.