• We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z=1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST/WFC3 observations cover about 50 sq. arcmin in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z=1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope (beta) is redder than at high redshift (z>3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at z=1-3 are massive, dustier and more highly star-forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities (0.1L*<~L<~2.5L*), though their median values are similar within 1-sigma uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all redshifts, find physically similar galaxies; and (4) stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of ~0.46, and star-formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of ~0.90. These relations hold true --- within luminosities probed in this study --- for LBGs from z~1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z~2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z>3, a true Lyman break selection at z~2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys, both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties, and their evolution.
  • We have conducted the first blind HI survey covering 480 deg^2 and a heliocentric velocity range from 300-1900 km/s to investigate the HI content of the nearby spiral-rich Ursa Major region and to look for previously uncatalogued gas-rich objects. Here we present the catalog of HI sources. The HI data were obtained with the 4-beam receiver mounted on the 76.2-m Lovell telescope (FWHM 12 arcmin) at the Jodrell Bank Observatory (UK) as part of the HI Jodrell All Sky Survey (HIJASS). We use the automated source finder DUCHAMP and identify 166 HI sources in the data cubes with HI masses in the range of 10^7 - 10^{10.5} M_sun. Our Ursa Major HI catalogue includes 10 first time detections in the 21-cm emission line. We identify optical counterparts for 165 HI sources (99 per cent). For 54 HI sources (33 per cent) we find numerous optical counterparts in the HIJASS beam, indicating a high density of galaxies and likely tidal interactions. Four of these HI systems are discussed in detail. We find only one HI source (1 per cent) without a visible optical counterpart out of the 166 HI detections. Green Bank Telescope (FWHM 9 arcmin) follow-up observations confirmed this HI source and its HI properties. The nature of this detection is discussed and compared to similar sources in other HI surveys.
  • In the first of a series of forthcoming publications, we present a panchromatic catalog of 102 visually-selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) from observations in the Early Release Science (ERS) program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) field. Our ETGs span a large redshift range, 0.35 < z < 1.5, with each redshift spectroscopically-confirmed by previous published surveys of the ERS field. We combine our measured WFC3 ERS and ACS GOODS-S photometry to gain continuous sensitivity from the rest-frame far-UV to near-IR emission for each ETG. The superior spatial resolution of the HST over this panchromatic baseline allows us to classify the ETGs by their small-scale internal structures, as well as their local environment. By fitting stellar population spectral templates to the broad-band photometry of the ETGs, we determine that the average masses of the ETGs are comparable to the characteristic stellar mass of massive galaxies, 11< log(M [Solar]) < 12. By transforming the observed photometry into the GALEX FUV and NUV, Johnson V, and SDSS g' and r' bandpasses we identify a noteworthy diversity in the rest-frame UV-optical colors and find the mean rest-frame (FUV-V)=3.5 and (NUV-V)=3.3, with 1$\sigma$ standard deviations approximately equal to 1.0. The blue rest-frame UV-optical colors observed for most of the ETGs are evidence for star-formation during the preceding gigayear, but no systems exhibit UV-optical photometry consistent with major recent (<~50 Myr) starbursts. Future publications which address the diversity of stellar populations likely to be present in these ETGs, and the potential mechanisms by which recent star-formation episodes are activated, are discussed.
  • We present grism spectra of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6-1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L 0.6-0.95 micron grism data in GOODS-South from the PEARS program, extending the wavelength covereage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the Ha, [OIII], and [OII] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2<z<1.4, 1.2<z<2.2 and 2.0<z<3.3 respectively in the G102 (0.8-1.1 microns; R~210) and G141 (1.1-1.6 microns; R~130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [SII] and [SIII] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star-formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 48 ELGs to m(AB)~25 mag. Seventeen GOODS-South galaxies that previously only had photometric redshifts now have new grism-spectroscopic redshifts, in some cases with large corrections to the photometric redshifts (Delta(z)~0.3-0.5). Additionally, one galaxy had no previously-measured redshift but now has a secure grism-spectroscopic redshift, for a total of 18 new GOODS-South spectroscopic redshifts. The faintest source in our sample has a magnitude m(AB)=26.9 mag. The ERS grism data also reflect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample as a function of redshift, consistent with downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes and redshifts to z>2.
  • We combine new high sensitivity ultraviolet (UV) imaging from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with existing deep HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) optical images from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) program to identify UV-dropouts, which are Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z~1-3. These new HST/WFC3 observations were taken over 50 sq.arcmin in the GOODS-South field as a part of the Early Release Science program. The uniqueness of these new UV data is that they are observed in 3 UV/optical (WFC3 UVIS) channel filters (F225W, F275W and F336W), which allows us to identify three different sets of UV-dropout samples. We apply Lyman break dropout selection criteria to identify F225W-, F275W- and F336W-dropouts, which are z~1.7, 2.1 and 2.7 LBG candidates, respectively. Our results are as follows: (1) these WFC3 UVIS filters are very reliable in selecting LBGs with z~2.0, which helps to reduce the gap between the well studied z~>3 and z~0 regimes, (2) the combined number counts agrees very well with the observed change in the surface densities as a function of redshift when compared with the higher redshift LBG samples; and (3) the best-fit Schechter function parameters from the rest-frame UV luminosity functions at three different redshifts fit very well with the evolutionary trend of the characteristic absolute magnitude, and the faint-end slope, as a function of redshift. This is the first study to illustrate the usefulness of the WFC3 UVIS channel observations to select z<3 LBGs. The addition of the new WFC3 on the HST has made it possible to uniformly select LBGs from z~1 to z~9, and significantly enhance our understanding of these galaxies using HST sensitivity and resolution.
  • Galaxies are complex systems the evolution of which apparently results from the interplay of dynamics, star formation, chemical enrichment, and feedback from supernova explosions and supermassive black holes. The hierarchical theory of galaxy formation holds that galaxies are assembled from smaller pieces, through numerous mergers of cold dark matter. The properties of an individual galaxy should be controlled by six independent parameters including mass, angular-momentum, baryon-fraction, age and size, as well as by the accidents of its recent haphazard merger history. Here we report that a sample of galaxies that were first detected through their neutral hydrogen radio-frequency emission, and are thus free of optical selection effects, shows five independent correlations among six independent observables, despite having a wide range of properties. This implies that the structure of these galaxies must be controlled by a single parameter, although we cannot identify this parameter from our dataset. Such a degree of organisation appears to be at odds with hierarchical galaxy formation, a central tenet of the cold dark matter paradigm in cosmology.
  • We analyse the properties of three unusual dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group discovered with the HIPASS survey. From their optical morphology they appear to be low surface brightness dwarf spheroidals, yet they are gas-rich (M_{HI}/L_{B} > 1) with gas-mass-to-stellar light ratios larger than typical dwarf irregular galaxies. Therefore these systems appear different from any dwarfs of the Local Group. They should be favoured hosts for starburst, whereas we find a faint star formation region in only one object. We have obtained 21-cm data and Hubble Space Telescope photometry in V and I bands, and have constructed Colour Magnitude Diagrams (CMDs) to investigate their stellar populations and to set a constraint on their age. From the comparison of the observed and model CMDs we infer that all three galaxies are at least older than 2 Gyr (possibly even as old as 10 Gyr) and remain gas-rich because their star formation rates (SFRs) have been very low (< 10^{-3} M_{sun}/yr) throughout. In such systems, star formation (SF) appears to have been sporadic and local, though one object (HIPASS J1321--31) has a peculiar red plume in its CMD suggesting that many of its stars were formed in a "miniburst" 300 - 500 Myr ago. The question of why there are no similar dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains open.
  • One explanation for the disparity between Cold Dark Matter (CDM) predictions of galaxy numbers and observations could be that there are numerous dark galaxies in the Universe. These galaxies may still contain baryons, but no stars, and may be detectable in the 21cm line of atomic hydrogen. The results of surveys for such objects, and simulations that do/do not predict their existence, are controversial. In this paper we use an analytical model of galaxy formation, consistent with CDM, to firstly show that dark galaxies are certainly a prediction of the model. Secondly, we show that objects like VIRGOHI21, a dark galaxy candidate recently discovered by us, while rare are predicted by the model. Thirdly, we show that previous 'blind' HI surveys have placed few constraints on the existence of dark galaxies. This is because they have either lacked the sensitivity and/or velocity resolution or have not had the required detailed optical follow up. We look forward to new 21cm blind surveys (ALFALFA and AGES) using the Arecibo multi-beam instrument which should find large numbers of dark galaxies if they exist.
  • The Northern HIPASS catalogue (NHICAT) is the northern extension of the HIPASS catalogue, HICAT (Meyer et al. 2004). This extension adds the sky area between the declination range of +2 deg < dec. < +25.5 deg to HICAT's declination range of -90 deg < dec. < +2 deg. HIPASS is a blind HI survey using the Parkes Radio Telescope covering 71% of the sky (including this northern extension) and a heliocentric velocity range of -1,280 km/s to 12,700 km/s . The entire Virgo Cluster region has been observed in the Northern HIPASS. The galaxy catalogue, NHICAT, contains 1002 sources with v_hel > 300 km/s . Sources with -300 km/s < v_hel < 300 km/s were excluded to avoid contamination by Galactic emission. In total, the entire HIPASS survey has found 5317 galaxies identified purely by their HI content. The full galaxy catalogue is publicly-available at <http://hipass.aus-vo.org>.
  • We present the largest catalogue to date of optical counterparts for HI radio-selected galaxies, Hopcat. Of the 4315 HI radio-detected sources from the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (Hipass) catalogue, we find optical counterparts for 3618 (84%) galaxies. Of these, 1798 (42%) have confirmed optical velocities and 848 (20%) are single matches without confirmed velocities. Some galaxy matches are members of galaxy groups. From these multiple galaxy matches, 714 (16%) have confirmed optical velocities and a further 258 (6%) galaxies are without confirmed velocities. For 481 (11%), multiple galaxies are present but no single optical counterpart can be chosen and 216 (5%) have no obvious optical galaxy present. Most of these 'blank fields' are in crowded fields along the Galactic plane or have high extinctions. Isolated 'Dark galaxy' candidates are investigated using an extinction cut of ABj < 1 mag and the blank fields category. Of the 3692 galaxies with an ABj extinction < 1 mag, only 13 are also blank fields. Of these, 12 are eliminated either with follow-up Parkes observations or are in crowded fields. The remaining one has a low surface brightness optical counterpart. Hence, no isolated optically dark galaxies have been found within the limits of the Hipass survey.
  • We have placed limits on the cosmological significance of gas-rich low surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies as a proportion of the total population of gas-rich galaxies by carrying out a very deep survey (HIDEEP) for neutral hydrogen (HI) with the Parkes multibeam system. Such a survey avoids the surface-brightness selection effects that limit the usefulness of optical surveys for finding LSB galaxies. To complement the HIDEEP survey we have digitally stacked eight 1-hour R-band Tech Pan films from the UK Schmidt Telescope covering 36 square degrees of the survey area to reach a very deep isophotal limit of 26.5 R mag/sq. arcsec. At this level, we find that all of the 129 HI sources within this area have optical counterparts and that 107 of them can be identified with individual galaxies. We have used the properties of the galaxies identified as the optical counterparts of the HI sources to estimate the significance of LSB galaxies (defined to be those at least 1.5 magnitudes dimmer in effective surface-brightness than the peak in the observed distribution seen in optical surveys). We calculate the contribution of LSB galaxies to the total number, neutral hydrogen density, luminosity density, baryonic mass density, dynamical mass density and cross-sectional area of gas-rich galaxies. We do not find any `Crouching Giant' LSB galaxies such as Malin 1, nor do we find a population of extremely low surface-brightness galaxies not previously found by optical surveys. Such objects must either be rare, gas-poor or outside the survey detection limits.
  • We have carried out an extremely long integration-time (9000 s/beam) 21-cm blind survey of 60 square degrees in Centaurus using the Parkes multibeam system. We find that the noise continues to fall as sqrt(t) throughout, enabling us to reach an HI column-density limit of 4.2 x 10^18 cm^-2 for galaxies with a velocity width of 200 km/s in the central 32 square degree region, making this the deepest survey to date in terms of column density sensitivity. The HI data are complemented by very deep optical observations from digital stacking of multi-exposure UK Schmidt Telescope R-band films, which reach an isophotal level of 26.5 R mag arcsec^-2 (~27.5 B mag arcsec^-2). 173 HI sources have been found, 96 of which have been uniquely identified with optical counterparts in the overlap area. There is not a single source without an optical counterpart. Although we have not measured the column-densities directly, we have inferred them from the optical sizes of their counterparts. All appear to have a column-density of N_HI = 10^(20.65 +/- 0.38). This is at least an order of magnitude above our sensitivity limit, with a scatter only marginally larger than the errors on N_HI. This needs explaining. If confirmed it means that HI surveys will only find low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with high M_HI/L_B. Gas-rich LSB galaxies with lower HI mass to light ratios do not exist. The paucity of low column-density galaxies also implies that no significant population will be missed by the all-sky HI surveys being carried out at Parkes and Jodrell Bank.
  • We present a new accurate measurement of the HI mass function of galaxies from the HIPASS Bright Galaxy Catalog, a sample of 1000 galaxies with the highest HI peak flux densities in the southern hemisphere (Koribalski et al. 2003). This sample spans nearly four orders of magnitude in HI mass (from log M_HI/M_sun=6.8 to 10.6, H0=75) and is the largest sample of HI selected galaxies to date. We develop a bivariate maximum likelihood technique to measure the space density of galaxies, and show that this is a robust method, insensitive to the effects of large scale structure. The resulting HI mass function can be fitted satisfactorily with a Schechter function with faint-end slope alpha=-1.30. This slope is found to be dependent on morphological type, with later type galaxies giving steeper slopes. We extensively test various effects that potentially bias the determination of the HI mass function, including peculiar motions of galaxies, large scale structure, selection bias, and inclination effects, and quantify these biases. The large sample of galaxies enables an accurate measurement of the cosmological mass density of neutral gas: Omega_HI=(3.8 +/- 0.6) x 10^{-4}. Low surface brightness galaxies contribute only 15% to this value, consistent with previous findings.
  • Details are presented of the HI Jodrell All Sky Survey (HIJASS). HIJASS is a blind neutral hydrogen (HI) survey of the northern sky, being conducted using the multibeam receiver on the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. HIJASS covers the velocity range -3500 km/s to 10000 km/s with a velocity resolution of 18.1 km/s and a spatial positional accuracy of ~2.5 arcmin. Thus far about 1115 sq deg have been surveyed. We describe the methods of detecting galaxies within the HIJASS data and of measuring their HI parameters. The properties of the resulting HI-selected sample of galaxies are described. Of the 222 sources so far confirmed, 170 (77 per cent) are clearly associated with a previously catalogued galaxy. A further 23 sources (10 percent) lie close (within 6 arcmin) to a previously catalogued galaxy for which no previous redshift exists. A further 29 sources (13 per cent) do not appear to be associated with any previously catalogued galaxy. The distributions of peak flux, integrated flux, HI mass and cz are discussed. We show, using the HIJASS data, that HI self-absorption is a significant, but often overlooked, effect in galaxies with large inclination angles to the line of sight. Properly accounting for it could increase the derived HI mass density of the local Universe by at least 25 per cent. The effect this will have on the shape of the HI Mass Function will depend on how self-absorption affects galaxies of different morphological types and HI masses. We also show that galaxies with small inclinations to the line of sight may also be excluded from HI-selected samples, since many such galaxies will have observed linewidths which are too narrow for them to be distinguished from narrow-band radio frequency interference.
  • Our extremely deep survey for extragalactic HI (HIDEEP) finds no intergalactic gas clouds, and no galaxies with HI at inferred global column-densities below 10^20 cm^-2 when we could have detected such objects down to a completeness limit of 4 x 10^18 cm^-2. We speculate that low surface-density hydrogen is either ionised or locked up in ``frozen discs'', i.e. structures where the local Ly-alpha is insufficient to excite the 21-cm transition to a spin-temperature above the cosmic background. Such ``frozen discs'' might be responsible for many QSOALSs.
  • Using HIPASS data, we have searched for HI in a ~25x25 sq.deg. region centred on the Fornax cluster. Within a velocity search range of 300 - 3700 km/s and a lower flux limit of ~40 mJy, 110 galaxies with HI emission were detected, one of which is previously uncatalogued. None of the detections has early-type morphology. Previously unknown velocities for 14 galaxies have been determined, with a further 4 velocity measurements being significantly dissimilar to published values. Identification of an optical counterpart is relatively unambiguous for more than ~90% of our HI galaxies. The galaxies appear to be embedded in a sheet at the cluster velocity which extends for more than 30 deg across the search area. At the nominal cluster distance of ~20 Mpc, this corresponds to an elongated structure more than 10 Mpc in extent. A velocity gradient across the structure is detected, with radial velocities increasing by \~500 km/s from SE to NW. The clustering of galaxies evident in optical surveys is only weakly suggested in the spatial distribution of our HI detections. Our results suggest a considerable deficit of HI-rich galaxies in the centre of the cluster. However, relative to the field, there is a 3(+/-1)-fold excess of HI-rich galaxies in the outer parts of the cluster where galaxies may be infalling towards the cluster for the first time.
  • Results are presented of the first blind HI survey of the M81 group of galaxies. The data were taken as part of the HI Jodrell All Sky Survey (HIJASS). The survey reveals several new aspects to the complex morphology of the HI distribution in the group. All four of the known dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies close to M81 can be unambiguously seen in the HIJASS data. Each forms part of the complex tidal structure in the area. We suggest that at least three of these galaxies may have formed recently from the tidal debris in which they are embedded. The structure connecting M81 to NGC2976 is revealed as a single tidal bridge of mass approx. 2.1 x 10^8 Msol and projected spatial extent approx. 80 kpc. Two `spurs' of HI projecting from the M81 complex to lower declinations are traced over a considerably larger spatial and velocity extent than by previous surveys. The dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies BK5N and Kar 64 lie at the spatial extremity of one of these features and appear to be associated with it. We suggest that these may be the remnants of dIrrs which has been stripped of gas and transmuted into dEs by close gravitational encounters with NGC3077. The nucleated dE galaxy Kar 61 is unambiguously detected in HI for the first time and has an HI mass of approx.10^8 Msol, further confirming it as a dE/dIrr transitional object. HIJASS has revealed one new possible group member, HIJASS J1021+6842. This object contains approx. 2 x 10^7 Msol of HI and lies approx.105arcmin from IC2574. It has no optical counterpart on the Digital Sky Survey.
  • The Case Against Cosmology (astro-ph/0009020)

    Sept. 1, 2000 astro-ph
    It is argued that some of the recent claims for cosmology are grossly overblown. Cosmology rests on a very small database: it suffers from many fundamental difficulties as a science (if it is a science at all) whilst observations of distant phenomena are difficult to make and harder to interpret. It is suggested that cosmological inferences should be tentatively made and sceptically received.
  • We report the discovery, from the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS), of an isolated cloud of neutral hydrogen which we believe to be extragalactic. The HI mass of the cloud (HIPASS J1712-64) is very low, 1.7 x 10^7 Msun, using an estimated distance of ~3.2 Mpc. Most significantly, we have found no optical companion to this object to very faint limits (mu(B)~ 27 mag arcsec^-2). HIPASS J1712-64 appears to be a binary system similar to, but much less massive than, HI 1225+01 (the Virgo HI Cloud) and has a size of at least 15 kpc. The mean velocity dispersion, measured with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), is only 4 km/s for the main component and because of the weak or non-existent star-formation, possibly reflects the thermal linewidth (T<2000 K) rather than bulk motion or turbulence. The peak column density for HIPASS J1712-64, from the combined Parkes and ATCA data, is only 3.5 x 10^19 cm^-2, which is estimated to be a factor of two below the critical threshold for star formation. Apart from its significantly higher velocity, the properties of HIPASS J1712-64 are similar to the recently recognised class of Compact High Velocity Clouds. We therefore consider the evidence for a Local Group or Galactic origin, although a more plausible alternative is that HIPASS J1712-64 was ejected from the interacting Magellanic Cloud/Galaxy system at perigalacticon ~ 2 x 10^8 yr ago.
  • We have commenced a 21-cm survey of the entire southern sky (\delta < 0 degrees, -1200 km/s < v < 12700 km/s) which is ''blind'', i.e. unbiased by previous optical information. In the present paper we report on the results of a pilot project which is based on data from this all-sky survey. The project was carried out on an area of 600 square degrees centred on the nearby Centaurus A (Cen A) group of galaxies at a mean velocity of v ~ 500 km/s. This was recently the subject of a separate and thorough optical survey. We found 10 new group members to add to the 21 galaxies already known in the Cen A group: five of these are previously uncatalogued galaxies, while five were previously catalogued but not known to be associated with the group. We found optical counterparts for all the HI detections, most of them intrinsically very faint low surface brightness dwarfs. The new group members add approximately 6% to the HI mass of the group and 4% to its light. The HI mass function, derived from all the known group galaxies in the interval 10^7 \Msun of HI to 10^9 \Msun of HI, has a faint-end slope of 1.30 +/- 0.15, allowing us to rule out a slope of 1.7 at 95% confidence. Even if the number in the lowest mass bin is increased by 50%, the slope only increases to 1.45 +/- 0.15.
  • Interactions between galaxies are common and are an important factor in determining their physical properties such as position along the Hubble sequence and star-formation rate. There are many possible galaxy interaction mechanisms, including merging, ram-pressure stripping, gas compression, gravitational interaction and cluster tides. The relative importance of these mechanisms is often not clear, as their strength depends on poorly known parameters such as the density, extent and nature of the massive dark halos that surround galaxies. A nearby example of a galaxy interaction where the mechanism is controversial is that between our own Galaxy and two of its neighbours -- the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Here we present the first results of a new HI survey which provides a spectacular view of this interaction. In addition to the previously known Magellanic Stream, which trails 100 degrees behind the Clouds, the new data reveal a counter-stream which lies in the opposite direction and leads the motion of the Clouds. This result supports the gravitational model in which leading and trailing streams are tidally torn from the body of the Magellanic Clouds.