• Far-infrared molecular emission is an important tool used to understand the excitation mechanisms of the gas in the inter-stellar medium of star-forming galaxies. In the present work, we model the emission from rotational transitions with critical densities n >~ 10^4 cm-3. We include 4-3 < J <= 15-14 transitions of CO and 13CO, in addition to J <= 7-6 transitions of HCN, HNC, and HCO+ on galactic scales. We do this by re-sampling high density gas in a hydrodynamic model of a gas-rich disk galaxy, assuming that the density field of the interstellar medium of the model galaxy follows the probability density function (PDF) inferred from the resolved low density scales. We find that in a narrow gas density PDF, with a mean density of ~10 cm-3 and a dispersion \sigma = 2.1 in the log of the density, most of the emission of molecular lines, emanates from the 10-1000 cm-3 part of the PDF. We construct synthetic emission maps for the central 2 kpc of the galaxy and fit the line ratios of CO and 13CO up to J = 15-14, as well as HCN, HNC, and HCO+ up to J = 7-6, using one photo-dissociation region (PDR) model. We attribute the goodness of the one component fits for our model galaxy to the fact that the distribution of the luminosity, as a function of density, is peaked at gas densities between 10 and 1000 cm-3. We explore the impact of different log-normal density PDFs on the distribution of the line-luminosity as a function of density, and we show that it is necessary to have a broad dispersion, corresponding to Mach numbers >~ 30 in order to obtain significant emission from n > 10^4 cm-3 gas. Such Mach numbers are expected in star-forming galaxies, LIRGS, and ULIRGS. By fitting line ratios of HCN(1-0), HNC(1-0), and HCO+(1-0) for a sample of LIRGS and ULIRGS using mechanically heated PDRs, we constrain the Mach number of these galaxies to 29 < M < 77.
  • (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies ((U)LIRGs) are objects characterized by their extreme infrared (8-1000 $\mu$m) luminosities ($L_{LIRG}>10^{11} $L$_\odot$ and $L_{ULIRG}>10^{12}$ L$_\odot$). The Herschel Comprehensive ULIRG Emission Survey (HerCULES; PI van der Werf) presents a representative flux-limited sample of 29 (U)LIRGs that spans the full luminosity range of these objects (10$^{11}\leq L_\odot \geq10^{13}$). With the \emph{Herschel Space Observatory}, we observe [CII] 157 $\mu$m, [OI] 63 $\mu$m, and [OI] 145 $\mu$m line emission with PACS, CO J=4-3 through J=13-12, [CI] 370 $\mu$m, and [CI] 609 $\mu$m with SPIRE, and low-J CO transitions with ground-based telescopes. The CO ladders of the sample are separated into three classes based on their excitation level. In 13 of the galaxies, the [OI] 63 $\mu$m emission line is self absorbed. Comparing the CO excitation to the IRAS 60/100 $\mu$m ratio and to far infrared luminosity, we find that the CO excitation is more correlated to the far infrared colors. We present cooling budgets for the galaxies and find fine-structure line flux deficits in the [CII], [SiII], [OI], and [CI] lines in the objects with the highest far IR fluxes, but do not observe this for CO $4\leq J_{upp}\leq13$. In order to study the heating of the molecular gas, we present a combination of three diagnostic quantities to help determine the dominant heating source. Using the CO excitation, the CO J=1-0 linewidth, and the AGN contribution, we conclude that galaxies with large CO linewidths always have high-excitation CO ladders, and often low AGN contributions, suggesting that mechanical heating is important.
  • Starburst galaxies are undergoing intense periods of star formation. Understanding the heating and cooling mechanisms in these galaxies can give us insight to the driving mechanisms that fuel the starburst. Molecular emission lines play a crucial role in the cooling of the excited gas. With SPIRE on the Herschel Space Observatory we have observed the rich molecular spectrum towards the central region of NGC 253. CO transitions from J=4-3 to 13-12 are observed and together with low-J line fluxes from ground based observations, these lines trace the excitation of CO. By studying the CO excitation ladder and comparing the intensities to models, we investigate whether the gas is excited by UV radiation, X-rays, cosmic rays, or turbulent heating. Comparing the $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO observations to large velocity gradient models and PDR models we find three main ISM phases. We estimate the density, temperature,and masses of these ISM phases. By adding $^{13}$CO, HCN, and HNC line intensities, we are able to constrain these degeneracies and determine the heating sources. The first ISM phase responsible for the low-J CO lines is excited by PDRs, but the second and third phases, responsible for the mid to high-J CO transitions, require an additional heating source. We find three possible combinations of models that can reproduce our observed molecular emission. Although we cannot determine which of these are preferable, we can conclude that mechanical heating is necessary to reproduce the observed molecular emission and cosmic ray heating is a negligible heating source. We then estimate the mass of each ISM phase; $6\times 10^7$ M$_\odot$ for phase 1 (low-J CO lines), $3\times 10^7$ M$_\odot$ for phase 2 (mid-J CO lines), and $9\times 10^6$ M$_\odot$ for phase 3 (high-J CO lines) for a total system mass of $1\times10^{8}$ M$_\odot$.
  • Because of its large angular size and proximity to the Milky Way, NGC 253, an archetypal starburst galaxy, provides an excellent laboratory to study the intricacies of this intense episode of star formation. We aim to characterize the excitation mechanisms driving the emission in NGC 253. Specifically we aim to distinguish between shock excitation and UV excitation as the dominant driving mechanism, using Br\gamma, H_2 and [FeII] as diagnostic emission line tracers. Using SINFONI observations, we create linemaps of Br\gamma, [FeII]_{1.64}, and all detected H_2 transitions. By using symmetry arguments of the gas and stellar gas velocity field, we find a kinematic center in agreement with previous determinations. The ratio of the 2-1 S(1) to 1-0 S(1) H_2 transitions can be used as a diagnostic to discriminate between shock and fluorescent excitation. Using the 1-0 S(1)/2-1 S(1) line ratio as well as several other H_2 line ratios and the morphological comparison between H_2 and Br\gamma and [FeII], we find that excitation from UV photons is the dominant excitation mechanisms throughout NGC 253. We employ a diagnostic energy level diagram to quantitatively differentiate between mechanisms. We compare the observed energy level diagrams to PDR and shock models and find that in most regions and over the galaxy as a whole, fluorescent excitation is the dominant mechanism exciting the H_2 gas. We also place an upper limit of the percentage of shock excited H_2 at 29%. We find that UV radiation is the dominant excitation mechanism for the H_2 emission. The H_2 emission does not correlate well with Br\gamma but closely traces the PAH emission, showing that not only is H_2 fluorescently excited, but it is predominately excited by slightly lower mass stars than O stars which excite Br\gamma, such as B stars.
  • Supernovae play an integral role in the feedback of processed material into the ISM of galaxies and are responsible for much of the chemical enrichment of the universe. The rate of supernovae can also reveal the star formation histories. Supernova rates are usually measured through the non-thermal radio continuum luminosity; however, a correlation between near-infrared [FeII] emission and supernova remnants has also been noted. We aim to find a quantitative relationship between the [FeII] at 1.26 um ([FeII]$_{1.26}$) luminosity and supernova rate in a sample of 11 near-by starburst galaxy centers. We perform a pixel-pixel analysis of this correlation on SINFONI data cubes. Using Br$\gamma$ equivalent width and luminosity as the only observational inputs into the Starburst 99 model, we derive the supernova rate at each pixel and thus create maps of supernova rates. We then compare these morphologically and quantitatively to the [FeII]$_{1.26}$ luminosity. We have found that a strong linear and morphological correlation exists between supernova rate and [FeII]$_{1.26}$ on a pixel-pixel basis: \[ log\frac{\nu_{SNrate}}{yr^{-1}pc^{-2}} = 1.01 \pm 0.2\ast log\frac{[FeII]_{1.26}}{erg s^{-1}pc^{-2}} - 41.17 \pm 0.9\] This relation is valid for normal star forming galaxies but breaks down for extreme ultra luminous galaxies. The supernova rates derived from the Starburst 99 model are in good agreement with the radio-derived supernova rates, which underlines the strength of using [FeII] emission as a tracer of supernova rate. With the strong correlation found in this sample of galaxies, we conclude that [FeII]$_{1.26}$ emission can be generally used to derive accurate supernova rates on either a pixel-pixel or integrated galactic basis.
  • Supernovae play an integral role in the feedback of processed material into the ISMof galaxies and are responsible for most of the chemical enrichment of the universe. The rate of supernovae can also reveal the star formation histories. Supernova rate is usually measured through the non-thermal radio continuum luminosity, but in this paper we establish a quantitative relationship between the [FeII]1.26 luminosity and supernova rate in a sample of 11 near-by starburst galaxies. SINFONI data cubes are used to perform a pixel pixel analysis of this correlation. Using Br equivalent width and luminosity as the only observational inputs into Starburst 99, the supernova rate is derived at each pixel and a map of supernova rate is created. This is then compared morphologically and quantitatively to [FeII]1.26 luminosity map. We find a strong linear and morphological correlation between supernova rate and [FeII]1.26 on a pixel-pixel basis: log SNrate yr-1 pc-2 = (1.01 \pm 0.2) \ast log[FeII]1.26 ergs-1 pc-2 - 41.17 \pm 0.9 The Starburst 99 derived supernova rates are also in good agreement with the radio derived supernova rates, which further demonstrates the strength of [FeII] as a tracer of supernova rate. With the strong correlation found in this sample of galaxies, we now qualitatively use [FeII]1.26 to derive supernova rate on either a pixel-pixel or integrated galactic basis.