• Although OGLE-TR-56b was the second transiting exoplanet discovered, only one light curve, observed in 2006, has been published besides the discovery data. We present twenty-one light curves of nineteen different transits observed between July 2003 and July 2009 with the Magellan Telescopes and Gemini South. The combined analysis of the new light curves confirms a slightly inflated planetary radius relative to model predictions, with R_p = 1.378 +/- 0.090 R_J. However, the values found for the transit duration, semimajor axis, and inclination values differ significantly from the previous result, likely due to systematic errors. The new semimajor axis and inclination, a = 0.01942 +/- 0.00015 AU and i = 73.72 +/- 0.18 degrees, are smaller than previously reported, while the total duration, T_14 = 7931 +/- 38 s, is 18 minutes longer. The transit midtimes have errors from 23 s to several minutes, and no evidence is seen for transit midtime or duration variations. Similarly, no change is seen in the orbital period, implying a nominal stellar tidal decay factor of Q_* = 10^7, with a three-sigma lower limit of 10^5.7.
  • We present ground-based optical observations of the September 2009 and January 2010 transits of HD 80606b. Based on 3 partial light curves of the September 2009 event, we derive a midtransit time of T_c [HJD] = 2455099.196 +- 0.026, which is about 1 sigma away from the previously predicted time. We observed the January 2010 event from 9 different locations, with most phases of the transit being observed by at least 3 different teams. We determine a midtransit time of T_c [HJD] = 2455210.6502 +- 0.0064, which is within 1.3 sigma of the time derived from a Spitzer observation of the same event.
  • We have analyzed the first 3.75 years of data from TAOS, the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey. TAOS monitors bright stars to search for occultations by Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). This dataset comprises 5e5 star-hours of multi-telescope photometric data taken at 4 or 5 Hz. No events consistent with KBO occultations were found in this dataset. We compute the number of events expected for the Kuiper Belt formation and evolution models of Pan & Sari (2005), Kenyon & Bromley (2004), Benavidez & Campo Bagatin (2009), and Fraser (2009). A comparison with the upper limits we derive from our data constrains the parameter space of these models. This is the first detailed comparison of models of the KBO size distribution with data from an occultation survey. Our results suggest that the KBO population is comprised of objects with low internal strength and that planetary migration played a role in the shaping of the size distribution.
  • We have performed an ecliptic imaging survey of the Kuiper belt with our deepest and widest field achieving a limiting flux of m(g') = 26.4, with a sky coverage of 3.0 square-degrees. This is the largest coverage of any other Kuiper belt survey to this depth. We detect 72 objects, two of which have been previously observed. We have improved the Bayesian maximum likelihood fitting technique presented in Gladman et al. (1998) to account for calibration and sky density variations and have used this to determine the luminosity function of the Kuiper belt. Combining our detections with previous surveys, we find the luminosity function is well represented by a single power-law with slope alpha = 0.65 +/- 0.05 and an on ecliptic sky density of 1 object per square-degree brighter than m(R)=23.42 +/- 0.13. Assuming constant albedos, this slope suggests a differential size-distribution slope of 4.25 +/- 0.25, which is steeper than the Dohnanyi slope of 3.5 expected if the belt is in a state of collisional equilibrium. We find no evidence for a roll-over or knee in the luminosity function and reject such models brightward of m(R) ~ 24.6.
  • We have conducted a deep ($15 \la r \la 23$), 20 night survey for transiting planets in the intermediate age ($\sim 550 {\rm Myr}$) open cluster M37 (NGC 2099) using the Megacam wide-field mosaic CCD camera on the 6.5m Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT). In this paper we present a catalog and light curves for 1445 variable stars; 1430 (99%) of these are new discoveries. We have discovered 20 new eclipsing binaries and 31 new short period ($P < 1 {\rm day}$) pulsating stars. The bulk of the variables are most likely rapidly rotating young low-mass stars, including a substantial number ($\ga 500$) that are members of the cluster. We identify and analyze five particularly interesting individual variables including a previously identified variable which we suggest is probably a hybrid $\gamma$ Doradus/$\delta$ Scuti pulsator, two possible quiescent cataclysmic variables, a detached eclipsing binary (DEB) with at least one $\gamma$ Doradus pulsating component (only the second such variable found in an eclipsing binary), and a low mass ($M_{P} \sim M_{S} \sim 0.6 M_{\odot}$) DEB that is a possible cluster member. A preliminary determination of the physical parameters for the DEB+$\gamma$ Doradus system yields $M_{P} = 1.58 \pm 0.04 M_{\odot}$, $M_{S} = 1.58 \pm 0.04 M_{\odot}$, $R_{P} = 1.39 \pm 0.07 R_{\odot}$ and $R_{S} = 1.38 \pm 0.07 R_{\odot}$.
  • We present deep optical photometry of the afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 041006 and its associated hypernova obtained over 65 days after detection (55 R-band epochs on 10 different nights). Our early data (t<4 days) joined with published GCN data indicates a steepening decay, approaching F_nu ~t^{-0.6} at early times (<<1 day) and F_nu ~t^{-1.3} at late times. The break at t_b=0.16+-0.04 days is the earliest reported jet break among all GRB afterglows. During our first night, we obtained 39 exposures spanning 2.15 hours from 0.62 to 0.71 days after the burst that reveal a smooth afterglow, with an rms deviation of 0.024 mag from the local power-law fit, consistent with photometric errors. After t~4 days, the decay slows considerably, and the light curve remains approximately flat at R~24 mag for a month before decaying by another magnitude to reach R~25 mag two months after the burst. This ``bump'' is well-fitted by a k-corrected light curve of SN1998bw, but only if stretched by a factor of 1.38 in time. In comparison with the other GRB-related SNe bumps, GRB 041006 stakes out new parameter space for GRB/SNe, with a very bright and significantly stretched late-time SN light curve. Within a small sample of fairly well observed GRB/SN bumps, we see a hint of a possible correlation between their peak luminosity and their ``stretch factor'', broadly similar to the well-studied Phillips relation for the type Ia supernovae.
  • We report UBVRI observations of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 021004. We observed significant (10-20%) deviations from a power law decay on several time scales, ranging from a few hours down to 20-30 minutes. We also observed a significant color change starting ~1.5 days after the burst, confirming the spectroscopic results already reported by Matheson et al. (2002). We discuss these results in the context of several models that have recently been proposed to account for the anomalous photometric behavior of this event.
  • We report polarization measurements and photometry for the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 020405. We measured a highly significant 9.9% polarization (in V band) 1.3 days after the burst and argue that it is intrinsic to the GRB. The light curve decay is well fitted by a $t^{-1.72}$ power-law; we do not see any evidence for a break between 1.24 and 4.3 days after the burst. We discuss these measurements in the light of several models of GRB afterglows.