• We demonstrate the active suppression of transmon qubit dephasing induced by dispersive measurement, using parametric amplification and analog feedback. By real-time processing of the homodyne record, the feedback controller reverts the stochastic quantum phase kick imparted by the measurement on the qubit. The feedback operation matches a model of quantum trajectories with measurement efficiency $\tilde{\eta} \approx 0.5$, consistent with the result obtained by postselection. We overcome the bandwidth limitations of the amplification chain by numerically optimizing the signal processing in the feedback loop and provide a theoretical model explaining the optimization result.
  • The stochastic evolution of quantum systems during measurement is arguably the most enigmatic feature of quantum mechanics. Measuring a quantum system typically steers it towards a classical state, destroying any initial quantum superposition and any entanglement with other quantum systems. Remarkably, the measurement of a shared property between non-interacting quantum systems can generate entanglement starting from an uncorrelated state. Of special interest in quantum computing is the parity measurement, which projects a register of quantum bits (qubits) to a state with an even or odd total number of excitations. Crucially, a parity meter must discern the two parities with high fidelity while preserving coherence between same-parity states. Despite numerous proposals for atomic, semiconducting, and superconducting qubits, realizing a parity meter creating entanglement for both even and odd measurement results has remained an outstanding challenge. We realize a time-resolved, continuous parity measurement of two superconducting qubits using the cavity in a 3D circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) architecture and phase-sensitive parametric amplification. Using postselection, we produce entanglement by parity measurement reaching 77% concurrence. Incorporating the parity meter in a feedback-control loop, we transform the entanglement generation from probabilistic to fully deterministic, achieving 66% fidelity to a target Bell state on demand. These realizations of a parity meter and a feedback-enabled deterministic measurement protocol provide key ingredients for active quantum error correction in the solid state.
  • Quasiparticle excitations adversely affect the performance of superconducting devices in a wide range of applications. They limit the sensitivity of photon detectors in astronomy, the accuracy of current sources in metrology, the cooling power of micro-refrigerators, and could break the topological protection of Majorana qubits. In superconducting circuits for quantum information processing, tunneling of quasiparticles across Josephson junctions constitutes a decoherence mechanism. As relaxation and pure dephasing times of transmon-type charge qubits now reach 100 microseconds, understanding whether quasiparticle tunneling may already bottleneck coherence is of high interest. We integrate recent advances in qubit readout and feedback control in circuit quantum electrodynamics to perform the first real-time observation of quasiparticle tunneling in a transmon qubit. We demonstrate quasiparticle-tunneling contributions to qubit relaxation and pure dephasing in the millisecond range. Thus, quasiparticle tunneling will not limit coherence for at least one order of magnitude beyond the state of the art.