• We explore the weak lensing E- and B-mode shear signals of a field of galaxy clusters using both large scale structure N-body simulations and multi-color Suprime-cam & Hubble Space Telescope observations. Using the ray-traced and observed shears along with photometric redshift catalogs, we generate mass maps of the foreground overdensities by optimally filtering the tangential shear that they induce on background galaxies. We then develop and test a method to approximate the foreground structure as a superposition of NFW-like halos by locating these overdensities and determining their mass and redshift, thereby modeling the background correlated shear field as a sum of lensings induced by the foreground clusters. We demonstrate that the B-mode maps and shear correlation functions, which are generated by similarly filtering the cross shear in this method, are in agreement with observations and are related to the estimated cluster masses and locations as well as the distribution of background sources. Using the foreground mass model, we identify several sources of weak lensing B-modes including leakage and edge effects, source clustering, and multiple lensing which can be observed in deep cosmic shear surveys.
  • We present the discovery and measurements of a gravitationally lensed supernova (SN) behind the galaxy cluster MOO J1014+0038. Based on multi-band Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Telescope (VLT) photometry of the supernova, and VLT spectroscopy of the host galaxy, we find a 97.5% probability that this SN is a SN Ia, and a 2.5% chance of a CC SN. Our typing algorithm combines the shape and color of the light curve with the expected rates of each SN type in the host galaxy. With a redshift of 2.2216, this is the highest redshift SN Ia discovered with a spectroscopic host-galaxy redshift. A further distinguishing feature is that the lensing cluster, at redshift 1.23, is the most distant to date to have an amplified SN. The SN lies in the middle of the color and light-curve shape distributions found at lower redshift, disfavoring strong evolution to z = 2.22. We estimate an amplification due to gravitational lensing of 2.8+0.6-0.5 (1.10 +- 0.23 mag)---compatible with the value estimated from the weak-lensing-derived mass and the mass-concentration relation from LambdaCDM simulations---making it the most amplified SN Ia discovered behind a galaxy cluster.
  • We report L-band VLA observations of 1RXS J0603.3+4214, a cluster that hosts a bright radio relic, known as the Toothbrush, and an elongated giant radio halo. These new observations allow us to study the surface brightness distribution down to one arcsec resolution with very high sensitivity. Our images provide an unprecedented detailed view of the Toothbrush, revealing enigmatic filamentary structures. To study the spectral index distribution, we complement our analysis with published LOFAR and GMRT observations. The bright `brush' of the Toothbrush shows a prominent narrow ridge to its north with a sharp outer edge. The spectral index at the ridge is in the range $-0.70\leq\alpha\leq-0.80$. We suggest that the ridge is caused by projection along the line of sight. With a simple toy model for the smallest region of the ridge, we conclude that the magnetic field is below $5\,\rm\mu G$ and varies significantly across the shock front. Our model indicates that the actual Mach number is higher than that obtained from the injection index and agrees well with the one derived from the overall spectrum, namely ${\cal M}=3.78^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$. The radio halo shows an average spectral index of $\alpha=-1.16\pm0.05$ and a slight gradient from north to south. The southernmost part of the halo is steeper and possibly related to a shock front. Excluding the southernmost part, the halo morphology agrees very well with the X-ray morphology. A power-law correlation is found between the radio and X-ray surface brightness
  • The second most significant detection of the Planck Sunyaev Zel'dovich survey, PLCK~G287.0+32.9 ($z=0.385$) boasts two similarly bright radio relics and a radio halo. One radio relic is located $\sim 400$ kpc northwest of the X-ray peak and the other $\sim 2.8$ Mpc to the southeast. This large difference suggests that a complex merging scenario is required. A key missing puzzle for the merging scenario reconstruction is the underlying dark matter distribution in high resolution. We present a joint Subaru Telescope and {\it Hubble Space Telescope} weak-lensing analysis of the cluster. Our analysis shows that the mass distribution features four significant substructures. Of the substructures, a primary cluster of mass $M_{200\text{c}}=1.59^{+0.25}_{-0.22}\times 10^{15} \ h^{-1}_{70} \ \text{M}_{\odot}$ dominates the weak-lensing signal. This cluster is likely to be undergoing a merger with one (or more) subcluster whose mass is approximately a factor of 10 lower. One candidate is the subcluster of mass $M_{200\text{c}}=1.16^{+0.15}_{-0.13}\times 10^{14} \ h^{-1}_{70} \ \text{M}_{\odot}$ located $\sim 400$ kpc to the southeast. The location of this subcluster suggests that its interaction with the primary cluster could be the source of the NW radio relic. Another subcluster is detected $\sim 2$ Mpc to the SE of the X-ray peak with mass $M_{200\text{c}}=1.68^{+0.22}_{-0.20}\times 10^{14} \ h^{-1}_{70} \ \text{M}_{\odot}$. This SE subcluster is in the vicinity of the SE radio relic and may have created the SE radio relic during a past merger with the primary cluster. The fourth subcluster, $M_{200\text{c}}=1.87^{+0.24}_{-0.22}\times 10^{14} \ h^{-1}_{70} \ \text{M}_{\odot}$, is northwest of the X-ray peak and beyond the NW radio relic.
  • We present a weak-lensing study of SPT-CLJ2040-4451 and IDCSJ1426+3508 at z=1.48 and 1.75, respectively. The two clusters were observed in our "See Change" program, a HST survey of 12 massive high-redshift clusters aimed at high-z supernova measurements and weak-lensing estimation of accurate cluster masses. We detect weak but significant galaxy shape distortions using IR images from the WFC3, which has not yet been used for weak-lensing studies. Both clusters appear to possess relaxed morphology in projected mass distribution, and their mass centroids agree nicely with those defined by both the galaxy luminosity and X-ray emission. Using an NFW profile, for which we assume that the mass is tightly correlated with the concentration parameter, we determine the masses of SPT-CL J2040-4451 and IDCS J1426+3508 to be M_{200}=8.6_{-1.4}^{+1.7}x10^14 M_sun and 2.2_{-0.7}^{+1.1}x10^14 M_sun, respectively. The weak-lensing mass of SPT-CLJ2040-4451 shows that the cluster is clearly a rare object. Adopting the central value, the expected abundance of such a massive cluster at z>1.48 is only ~0.07 in the parent 2500 sq. deg. survey. However, it is yet premature to claim that the presence of this cluster creates a serious tension with the current LCDM paradigm unless that tension will remain in future studies after marginalizing over many sources of uncertainties such as the accuracy of the mass function and the mass-concentration relation at the high mass end. The mass of IDCSJ1426+3508 is in excellent agreement with our previous ACS-based weak-lensing result while the much higher source density from our WFC3 imaging data makes the current statistical uncertainty ~40% smaller.
  • ZwCl 2341.1+0000, a merging galaxy cluster with disturbed X-ray morphology and widely separated ($\sim$3 Mpc) double radio relics, was thought to be an extremely massive ($10-30 \times 10^{14} M_\odot$) and complex system with little known about its merger history. We present JVLA 2-4 GHz observations of the cluster, along with new spectroscopy from our Keck/DEIMOS survey, and apply Gaussian Mixture Modeling to the three-dimensional distribution of 227 confirmed cluster galaxies. After adopting the Bayesian Information Criterion to avoid overfitting, which we discover can bias total dynamical mass estimates high, we find that a three-substructure model with a total dynamical mass estimate of $9.39 \pm 0.81 \times 10^{14} M_\odot$ is favored. We also present deep Subaru imaging and perform the first weak lensing analysis on this system, obtaining a weak lensing mass estimate of $5.57 \pm 2.47 \times 10^{14} M_\odot$. This is a more robust estimate because it does not depend on the dynamical state of the system, which is disturbed due to the merger. Our results indicate that ZwCl 2341.1+0000 is a multiple merger system comprised of at least three substructures, with the main merger that produced the radio relics occurring near to the plane of the sky, and a younger merger in the North occurring closer to the line of sight. Dynamical modeling of the main merger reproduces observed quantities (relic positions and polarizations, subcluster separation and radial velocity difference), if the merger axis angle of $\sim$10$^{+34}_{-6}$ degrees and the collision speed at pericenter is $\sim$1900$^{+300}_{-200}$ km/s.
  • We analyze a rich dataset including Subaru/SuprimeCam, HST/ACS and WFC3, Keck/DEIMOS, Chandra/ACIS-I, and JVLA/C and D array for the merging galaxy cluster ZwCl 0008.8+5215. With a joint Subaru/HST weak gravitational lensing analysis, we identify two dominant subclusters and estimate the masses to be M$_{200}=\text{5.7}^{+\text{2.8}}_{-\text{1.8}}\times\text{10}^{\text{14}}\,\text{M}_{\odot}$ and 1.2$^{+\text{1.4}}_{-\text{0.6}}\times10^{14}$ M$_{\odot}$. We estimate the projected separation between the two subclusters to be 924$^{+\text{243}}_{-\text{206}}$ kpc. We perform a clustering analysis on confirmed cluster member galaxies and estimate the line of sight velocity difference between the two subclusters to be 92$\pm$164 km s$^{-\text{1}}$. We further motivate, discuss, and analyze the merger scenario through an analysis of the 42 ks of Chandra/ACIS-I and JVLA/C and D polarization data. The X-ray surface brightness profile reveals a remnant core reminiscent of the Bullet Cluster. The X-ray luminosity in the 0.5-7.0 keV band is 1.7$\pm$0.1$\times$10$^{\text{44}}$ erg s$^{-\text{1}}$ and the X-ray temperature is 4.90$\pm$0.13 keV. The radio relics are polarized up to 40$\%$. We implement a Monte Carlo dynamical analysis and estimate the merger velocity at pericenter to be 1800$^{+\text{400}}_{-\text{300}}$ km s$^{-\text{1}}$. ZwCl 0008.8+5215 is a low-mass version of the Bullet Cluster and therefore may prove useful in testing alternative models of dark matter. We do not find significant offsets between dark matter and galaxies, as the uncertainties are large with the current lensing data. Furthermore, in the east, the BCG is offset from other luminous cluster galaxies, which poses a puzzle for defining dark matter -- galaxy offsets.
  • On the largest scales, the Universe consists of voids and filaments making up the cosmic web. Galaxy clusters are located at the knots in this web, at the intersection of filaments. Clusters grow through accretion from these large-scale filaments and by mergers with other clusters and groups. In a growing number of galaxy clusters, elongated Mpc-size radio sources have been found, so-called radio relics. These relics are thought to trace relativistic electrons in the intracluster plasma accelerated by low-Mach number collisionless shocks generated by cluster-cluster merger events. A long-standing problem is how low-Mach number shocks can accelerate electrons so efficiently to explain the observed radio relics. Here we report on the discovery of a direct connection between a radio relic and a radio galaxy in the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3411-3412. This discovery indicates that fossil relativistic electrons from active galactic nuclei are re-accelerated at cluster shocks. It also implies that radio galaxies play an important role in governing the non-thermal component of the intracluster medium in merging clusters.
  • We present a tomographic cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), which, providing a limiting magnitude r_{lim}~27 (5 sigma), is designed as a pre-cursor Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey with an emphasis on depth. Using five tomographic redshift bins, we study their auto- and cross-correlations to constrain cosmological parameters. We use a luminosity-dependent nonlinear model to account for the astrophysical systematics originating from intrinsic alignments of galaxy shapes. We find that the cosmological leverage of the DLS is among the highest among existing >10 sq. deg cosmic shear surveys. Combining the DLS tomography with the 9-year results of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9) gives Omega_m=0.293_{-0.014}^{+0.012}, sigma_8=0.833_{-0.018}^{+0.011}, H_0=68.6_{-1.2}^{+1.4} km/s/Mpc, and Omega_b=0.0475+-0.0012 for LCDM, reducing the uncertainties of the WMAP9-only constraints by ~50%. When we do not assume flatness for LCDM, we obtain the curvature constraint Omega_k=-0.010_{-0.015}^{+0.013} from the DLS+WMAP9 combination, which however is not well constrained when WMAP9 is used alone. The dark energy equation of state parameter w is tightly constrained when Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) data are added, yielding w=-1.02_{-0.09}^{+0.10} with the DLS+WMAP9+BAO joint probe. The addition of supernova constraints further tightens the parameter to w=-1.03+-0.03. Our joint constraints are fully consistent with the final Planck results and also the predictions of a LCDM universe.
  • We present new HST optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry of the rich globular cluster (GC) system of NGC 4874, the cD galaxy in the core of the Coma cluster (Abell 1656). NGC 4874 was observed with the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys in the F475W (g) and F814W (I) passbands and the Wide Field Camera 3 IR Channel in F160W (H). The GCs in this field exhibit a bimodal optical color distribution with more than half of the GCs falling on the red side at g-I > 1. Bimodality is also present, though less conspicuously, in the optical-NIR I-H color. Consistent with past work, we find evidence for nonlinearity in the g-I versus I-H color-color relation. Our results thus underscore the need for understanding the detailed form of the color-metallicity relations in interpreting observational data on GC bimodality. We also find a very strong color-magnitude trend, or "blue tilt," for the blue component of the optical color distribution of the NGC 4874 GC system. A similarly strong trend is present for the overall mean I-H color as a function of magnitude; for M_814 < -10 mag, these trends imply a steep mass-metallicity scaling with $Z\propto M_{\rm GC}^{1.4\pm0.4}$, but the scaling is not a simple power law and becomes much weaker at lower masses. As in other similar systems, the spatial distribution of the blue GCs is more extended than that of the red GCs, partly because of blue GCs associated with surrounding cluster galaxies. In addition, the center of the GC system is displaced by 4+/-1 kpc towards the southwest from the luminosity center of NGC 4874, in the direction of NGC 4872. Finally, we remark on a dwarf elliptical galaxy with a noticeably asymmetrical GC distribution. Interestingly, this dwarf has a velocity of nearly -3000 km/s with respect to NGC 4874; we suggest it is on its first infall into the cluster core and is undergoing stripping of its GC system by the cluster potential.
  • The galaxy cluster RX J0603.3+4214 at z=0.225 is one of the rarest clusters boasting an extremely large (~2 Mpc) radio-relic. Because of the remarkable morphology of the relic, the cluster is nicknamed "Toothbrush Cluster". Although the cluster's underlying mass distribution is one of the critical pieces of information needed to reconstruct the merger scenario responsible for the puzzling radio-relic morphology, its proximity to the Galactic plane b~10 deg has imposed significant observational challenges. We present a high-resolution weak-lensing study of the cluster with Subaru/Suprime Cam and Hubble Space Telescope imaging data. Our mass reconstruction reveals that the cluster is comprised of complicated dark matter substructures closely tracing the galaxy distribution, however in contrast with the relatively simple binary X-ray morphology. Nevertheless, we find that the cluster mass is still dominated by the two most massive clumps aligned north-south with a ~3:1 mass ratio (M_{200}=6.29_{-1.62}^{+2.24} x 10^{14} Msun and 1.98_{-0.74}^{+1.24} x 10^{14} Msun for the northern and southern clumps, respectively). The southern mass peak is ~2' offset toward the south with respect to the corresponding X-ray peak, which has a "bullet"-like morphology pointing south. Comparison of the current weak-lensing result with the X-ray, galaxy, and radio-relic suggests that perhaps the dominant mechanism responsible for the observed relic may be a high-speed collision of the two most massive subclusters, although the peculiarity of the morphology necessitates involvement of additional sub-clusters. Careful numerical simulations should follow in order to obtain more complete understanding of the merger scenario utilizing all existing observations.
  • We present a weak lensing study of the galaxy cluster IDCS J1426.5+3508 at $z=1.75$, which is the highest redshift strong lensing cluster known and the most distant cluster for which a weak lensing analysis has been undertaken. Using F160W, F814W, and F606W observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, we detect tangential shear at $2\sigma$ significance. Fitting a Navarro-Frenk-White mass profile to the shear with a theoretical median mass-concentration relation, we derive a mass $M_{200,\mathrm{crit}}=2.3^{+2.1}_{-1.4}\times10^{14}$ M$_{\odot}$. This mass is consistent with previous mass estimates from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, X-ray, and strong lensing. The cluster lies on the local SZ-weak lensing mass scaling relation observed at low redshift, indicative of minimal evolution in this relation.
  • Using overlapping fields with space-based Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based Subaru Telescope imaging we identify a population of blended galaxies that are blended to such a large degree that they are detected as single objects in the ground-based monochromatic imaging, which we label as 'ambiguous blends'. For deep imaging data, such as the depth targeted with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the ambiguous blend population is both large ($\sim 14$%) and has a distribution of ellipticities that is different from that of unblended objects in a way that will likely be important for the weak lensing measurements. Most notably, for a limiting magnitude of $i \sim 27$ we find that ambiguous blending results in a ~14% increase in shear noise (or ~12% decrease in the effective projected number density of lensed galaxies; neff) due to 1) larger intrinsic ellipticity dispersion, 2) a scaling with the galaxy number density $N_{gal}$ that is shallower than 1/$\sqrt{N_{gal}}$. For the LSST Gold Sample ($i < 25.3$) there is a ~7% increase in shear noise (or ~7% decrease in $n_{eff}$). More importantly than these increases in the shear noise, we find that the ellipticity distribution of ambiguous blends has an RMS 13% larger than that of non-blended galaxies. Given the need of future weak lensing surveys to constrain the ellipticity distribution of galaxies to better than a percent in order to mitigate cosmic shear multiplicative biases, the different ellipticity distribution of ambiguous blends could be a dominant systematic if unaccounted for.
  • Merging galaxy clusters with radio relics provide rare insights to the merger dynamics as the relics are created by the violent merger process. We demonstrate one of the first uses of the properties of the radio relic to reduce the uncertainties of the dynamical variables and determine the 3D configuration of a cluster merger, ACT-CL J0102-4915, nicknamed El Gordo. From the double radio relic observation and the X-ray observation of a comet-like gas morphology induced by motion of the cool core, it is widely believed that El Gordo is observed shortly after the first core-passage of the subclusters. We employ a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) configuration and dynamics of El Gordo. Using the polarization fraction of the radio relic, we constrain the estimate of the angle between the plane of the sky and the merger axis to be $\alpha = 21~{\rm degree} \pm^9_{11}$. We find the relative 3D merger speed of El Gordo to be $2400\pm^{400}_{200}~{\rm km}~{\rm s}^{-1}$ at pericenter. The two possible estimates of the time-since-pericenter are $0.46\pm^{0.09}_{0.16}$ Gyr and $0.91\pm^{0.22}_{0.39}$ Gyr for the outgoing and returning scenario respectively. We put our estimates of the time-since-pericenter into context by showing that if the time-averaged shock velocity is approximately equal to or smaller than the pericenter velocity of the corresponding subcluster in the center of mass frame, the two subclusters are more likely to be moving towards, rather than away, from each other, post apocenter. We compare and contrast the merger scenario of El Gordo with that of the Bullet Cluster, and show that this late-stage merging scenario explains why the southeast dark matter lensing peak of El Gordo is closer to the merger center than the southeast cool core.
  • We present first results from the third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) challenge, the third in a sequence of challenges for testing methods of inferring weak gravitational lensing shear distortions from simulated galaxy images. GREAT3 was divided into experiments to test three specific questions, and included simulated space- and ground-based data with constant or cosmologically-varying shear fields. The simplest (control) experiment included parametric galaxies with a realistic distribution of signal-to-noise, size, and ellipticity, and a complex point spread function (PSF). The other experiments tested the additional impact of realistic galaxy morphology, multiple exposure imaging, and the uncertainty about a spatially-varying PSF; the last two questions will be explored in Paper II. The 24 participating teams competed to estimate lensing shears to within systematic error tolerances for upcoming Stage-IV dark energy surveys, making 1525 submissions overall. GREAT3 saw considerable variety and innovation in the types of methods applied. Several teams now meet or exceed the targets in many of the tests conducted (to within the statistical errors). We conclude that the presence of realistic galaxy morphology in simulations changes shear calibration biases by $\sim 1$ per cent for a wide range of methods. Other effects such as truncation biases due to finite galaxy postage stamps, and the impact of galaxy type as measured by the S\'{e}rsic index, are quantified for the first time. Our results generalize previous studies regarding sensitivities to galaxy size and signal-to-noise, and to PSF properties such as seeing and defocus. Almost all methods' results support the simple model in which additive shear biases depend linearly on PSF ellipticity.
  • CIZA J2242.8+5301 (`Sausage') and 1RXS J0603.3+4213 (`Toothbrush') are two low-redshift ($z\sim0.2$), massive ($\sim2\times10^{15}M_\odot$), post-core passage merging clusters, which host shock waves traced by diffuse radio emission. To study their star-formation properties, we uniformly survey the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' clusters in broad and narrow band filters and select a sample of $201$ and $463$ line emitters, down to a rest-frame equivalent width ($13${\AA}). We robustly separate between H$\alpha$ and higher redshift emitters using a combination of optical multi-band (B, g, V, r, i, z) and spectroscopic data. We build H$\alpha$ luminosity functions for the entire cluster region, near the shock fronts, and away from the shock fronts and find striking differences between the two clusters. In the dynamically younger, $1$ Gyr old `Sausage' cluster we find numerous ($59$) H$\alpha$ emitters above a star-formation rate (SFR) of $0.17$ M$_{\sun}$ yr$^{-1}$ surprisingly located in close proximity to the shock fronts, embedded in very hot intra-cluster medium plasma. The SFR density for the cluster population is at least at the level of typical galaxies at $z\sim2$. Down to the same star-formation rate, the possibly dynamically more evolved `Toothbrush' cluster has only $9$ H$\alpha$ galaxies. The cluster H$\alpha$ galaxies fall on the SFR-stellar mass relation $z\sim0.2$ for the field. However, the `Sausage' cluster has an H$\alpha$ emitter density $>20$ times that of blank fields. If the shock passes through gas-rich cluster galaxies, the compressed gas could collapse into dense clouds and excite star-formation for a few $100$ Myr. This process ultimately leads to a rapid consumption of the molecular gas, accelerating the transformation of gas-rich field spirals into cluster S0s or ellipticals.
  • X-ray and radio observations of CIZA J2242.8+5301 suggest that it is a major cluster merger. Despite being well studied in the X-ray, and radio, little has been presented on the cluster structure and dynamics inferred from its galaxy population. We carried out a deep (i<25) broad band imaging survey of the system with Subaru SuprimeCam (g & i bands) and the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (r band) as well as a comprehensive spectroscopic survey of the cluster area (505 redshifts) using Keck DEIMOS. We use this data to perform a comprehensive galaxy/redshift analysis of the system, which is the first step to a proper understanding the geometry and dynamics of the merger, as well as using the merger to constrain self-interacting dark matter. We find that the system is dominated by two subclusters of comparable richness with a projected separation of 6.9'^{+0.7}_{-0.5} (1.3^{+0.13}_{-0.10} Mpc). We find that the north and south subclusters have similar redshifts of z=0.188 with a relative line-of-sight velocity difference of 69+/-190 km/s. We also find that north and south subclusters have velocity dispersions of 1160^{+100}_{-90} km/s and 1080^{+100}_{-70} km/s, respectively. These correspond to masses of 16.1^{+4.6}_{-3.3}x10^14 M_sun and 13.0^{+4.0}_{-2.5}x10^14 M_sun, respectively. While velocity dispersion measurements of merging clusters can be biased we believe the bias in this system to be minor due to the large projected separation and nearly plane-of-sky merger configuration. CIZA J2242.8+5301 is a relatively clean dissociative cluster merger with near 1:1 mass ratio, which makes it an ideal merger for studying merger associated physical phenomena.
  • CIZA J2242.8+5301 is a merging system with a prominent (~2 Mpc long) radio relic, which together with the morphology of the X-ray emission provides strong evidence for a violent collision along the N-S axis. We present our constraints on the dark matter distribution of this unusual system using Subaru and CFHT imaging data. Measuring a high S/N lensing signal from this cluster is potentially a challenging task because of its proximity to the Milky Way plane (|b|~5 deg). We overcome this challenge with careful observation planning and systematics control, which enables us to successfully map the dark matter distribution of the cluster with high fidelity. The resulting mass map shows that the mass distribution is highly elongated along the N-S merger axis inferred from the orientation of the radio relics. Based on our mass reconstruction, we identify two sub-clusters, which coincide with the cluster galaxy distributions. We determine their masses using MCMC analysis by simultaneously fitting two NFW halos without fixing their centroids. The resulting masses of the northern and southern systems are $M_{200}=11.0_{-3.2}^{+3.7}\times10^{14} M_{\sun}$ and $9.8_{-2.5}^{+3.8}\times10^{14} M_{\sun}$, respectively, indicating that we are witnessing a post-collision of two giant systems of nearly equal mass. When the mass and galaxy centroids are compared in detail, we detect ~ 1' (~190 kpc) offsets in both northern and southern sub-clusters. We find that the galaxy luminosity-mass offset for the northern clump is statistically significant at the ~2 sigma level whereas the detection is only marginal for the southern sub-cluster in part because of a relatively large mass centroid error. We conclude that it is yet premature to uniquely attribute the galaxy-mass misalignment to SIDM and discuss caveats.
  • (Abridged) We present a HST weak-lensing study of the merging galaxy cluster "El Gordo" (ACT-CL J0102-4915) at z=0.87 discovered by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope collaboration as the strongest SZ decrement in its ~1000 sq. deg survey. Our weak-lensing analysis confirms that ACT-CL J0102-4915 is indeed an extreme system consisting of two massive (~10^15 Msun each) subclusters with a projected separation of ~0.7 Mpc. This binary mass structure revealed by our lensing study is consistent with the cluster galaxy distribution and the dynamical study carried out with 89 spectroscopic members. We estimate the mass of ACT-CL J0102-4915 by simultaneously fitting two axisymmetric NFW profiles allowing their centers to vary. Our MCMC analysis shows that the masses of the northwestern (NW) and the southeastern (SE) components are M200c=(1.38+-0.22) x 10^15 Msun and (0.78+-0.20) x 10^15 Msun, respectively. The lensing-based velocity dispersions are consistent with their spectroscopic measurements. The centroids of both components are tightly constrained (~4") and close to the optical luminosity centers. The X-ray and mass peaks are spatially offset by ~8" (~62 kpc), which is significant at the ~2 sigma confidence level and confirms that the baryonic and dark matter in this cluster are disassociated. The dark matter peak, however, does not lead the gas peak in the direction expected if we are viewing the cluster soon after first core passage during a high speed merger. Under the assumption that the merger is happening in the plane of the sky, extrapolation of the two NFW halos to a radius r200a=2.4 Mpc yields a combined mass of M200a=(3.13+-0.56) x 10^15 Msun. This extrapolated total mass is consistent with our two-component-based dynamical analysis and previous X-ray measurements, projecting ACT-CL J0102-4915 to be the most massive cluster at z>0.6 known to date.
  • We present the results from a weak gravitational lensing study of the merging cluster A520 based on the analysis of Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) data. The excellent data quality allows us to reach a mean number density of source galaxies of ~109 per sq. arcmin, which improves both resolution and significance of the mass reconstruction compared to a previous study based on Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images. We take care in removing instrumental effects such as the trailing of charge due to radiation damage of the ACS detector and the position-dependent point spread function (PSF). This new ACS analysis confirms the previous claims that a substantial amount of dark mass is present between two luminous subclusters. We examine the distribution of cluster galaxies and observe very little light at this location. We find that the centroid of the dark peak in the current ACS analysis is offset to the southwest by ~1 arcmin with respect to the centroid from the WFPC2 analysis. Interestingly, this new centroid is in better spatial agreement with the location where the X-ray emission is strongest, and the mass-to-light ratio estimated with this centroid is much higher 813+-78 M_sun/L_Rsun than the previous value; the aperture mass based on the WFPC2 centroid provides a slightly lower, but consistent mass. Although we cannot provide a definite explanation for the presence of the dark peak, we discuss a revised scenario, wherein dark matter with a more conventional range sigma_DM/m_DM < 1 cm^2/g of self-interacting cross-section can lead to the detection of this dark substructure. If supported by detailed numerical simulations, this hypothesis opens up the possibility that the A520 system can be used to establish a lower limit of the self-interacting cross-section of dark matter.
  • We perform a morphological study of 124 spectroscopically confirmed cluster galaxies in the z=0.84 galaxy cluster RX J0152.7-1357. Our classification scheme includes color information, visual morphology, and 1-component and 2-component light profile fitting derived from Hubble Space Telescope riz imaging. We adopt a modified version of a detailed classification scheme previously used in studies of field galaxies and found to be correlated with kinematic features of those galaxies. We compare our cluster galaxy morphologies to those of field galaxies at similar redshift. We also compare galaxy morphologies in regions of the cluster with different dark-matter density as determined by weak-lensing maps. We find an early-type fraction for the cluster population as a whole of 47%, about 2.8 times higher than the field, and similar to the dynamically young cluster MS 1054 at similar redshift. We find the most drastic change in morphology distribution between the low and intermediate dark matter density regions within the cluster, with the early type fraction doubling and the peculiar fraction dropping by nearly half. The peculiar fraction drops more drastically than the spiral fraction going from the outskirts to the intermediate-density regions. This suggests that many galaxies falling into clusters at z~0.8 may evolve directly from peculiar, merging, and compact systems into early-type galaxies, without having the chance to first evolve into a regular spiral galaxy.
  • We present a cosmic shear study from the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), a deep BVRz multi-band imaging survey of five 4 sq. degree fields with two National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) 4-meter telescopes at Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo. For both telescopes, the change of the point-spread-function (PSF) shape across the focal plane is complicated, and the exposure-to-exposure variation of this position-dependent PSF change is significant. We overcome this challenge by modeling the PSF separately for individual exposures and CCDs with principal component analysis (PCA). We find that stacking these PSFs reproduces the final PSF pattern on the mosaic image with high fidelity, and the method successfully separates PSF-induced systematics from gravitational lensing effects. We calibrate our shears and estimate the errors, utilizing an image simulator, which generates sheared ground-based galaxy images from deep Hubble Space Telescope archival data with a realistic atmospheric turbulence model. For cosmological parameter constraints, we marginalize over shear calibration error, photometric redshift uncertainty, and the Hubble constant. We use cosmology-dependent covariances for the Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis and find that the role of this varying covariance is critical in our parameter estimation. Our current non-tomographic analysis alone constrains the Omega_M-sigma_8 likelihood contour tightly, providing a joint constraint of Omega_M=0.262+-0.051 and sigma_8=0.868+-0.071. We expect that a future DLS weak-lensing tomographic study will further tighten these constraints because explicit treatment of the redshift dependence of cosmic shear more efficiently breaks the Omega_M-sigma_8 degeneracy. Combining the current results with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-year (WMAP7) likelihood data, we obtain Omega_M=0.278+-0.018 and sigma_8=0.815+-0.020.
  • We examine the projected correlation of galaxies with mass from small scales (<few hundred kpc) where individual dark matter halos dominate, out to 15 Mpc where correlated large-scale structure dominates. We investigate these profiles as a function of galaxy luminosity and redshift. Selecting 0.8 million galaxies in the Deep Lens Survey, we use photometric redshifts and stacked weak gravitational lensing shear tomography out to radial scales of 1 degree from the centers of foreground galaxies. We detect correlated mass density from multiple halos and large-scale structure at radii larger than the virial radius, and find the first observational evidence for growth in the galaxy-mass correlation on 10 Mpc scales with decreasing redshift and fixed range of luminosity. For a fixed range of redshift, we find a scaling of projected halo mass with rest-frame luminosity similar to previous studies at lower redshift. We control systematic errors in shape measurement and photometric redshift, enforce volume completeness through absolute magnitude cuts, and explore residual sample selection effects via simulations.
  • The weak-lensing science of the LSST project drives the need to carefully model and separate the instrumental artifacts from the intrinsic lensing signal. The dominant source of the systematics for all ground based telescopes is the spatial correlation of the PSF modulated by both atmospheric turbulence and optical aberrations. In this paper, we present a full FOV simulation of the LSST images by modeling both the atmosphere and the telescope optics with the most current data for the telescope specifications and the environment. To simulate the effects of atmospheric turbulence, we generated six-layer phase screens with the parameters estimated from the on-site measurements. For the optics, we combined the ray-tracing tool ZEMAX and our simulated focal plane data to introduce realistic aberrations and focal plane height fluctuations. Although this expected flatness deviation for LSST is small compared with that of other existing cameras, the fast f-ratio of the LSST optics makes this focal plane flatness variation and the resulting PSF discontinuities across the CCD boundaries significant challenges in our removal of the systematics. We resolve this complication by performing PCA CCD-by-CCD, and interpolating the basis functions using conventional polynomials. We demonstrate that this PSF correction scheme reduces the residual PSF ellipticity correlation below 10^-7 over the cosmologically interesting scale. From a null test using HST/UDF galaxy images without input shear, we verify that the amplitude of the galaxy ellipticity correlation function, after the PSF correction, is consistent with the shot noise set by the finite number of objects. Therefore, we conclude that the current optical design and specification for the accuracy in the focal plane assembly are sufficient to enable the control of the PSF systematics required for weak-lensing science with the LSST.
  • LSST Science Collaborations: Paul A. Abell, Julius Allison, Scott F. Anderson, John R. Andrew, J. Roger P. Angel, Lee Armus, David Arnett, S. J. Asztalos, Tim S. Axelrod, Stephen Bailey, D. R. Ballantyne, Justin R. Bankert, Wayne A. Barkhouse, Jeffrey D. Barr, L. Felipe Barrientos, Aaron J. Barth, James G. Bartlett, Andrew C. Becker, Jacek Becla, Timothy C. Beers, Joseph P. Bernstein, Rahul Biswas, Michael R. Blanton, Joshua S. Bloom, John J. Bochanski, Pat Boeshaar, Kirk D. Borne, Marusa Bradac, W. N. Brandt, Carrie R. Bridge, Michael E. Brown, Robert J. Brunner, James S. Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, James H. Burge, David L. Burke, Phillip A. Cargile, Srinivasan Chandrasekharan, George Chartas, Steven R. Chesley, You-Hua Chu, David Cinabro, Mark W. Claire, Charles F. Claver, Douglas Clowe, A. J. Connolly, Kem H. Cook, Jeff Cooke, Asantha Cooray, Kevin R. Covey, Christopher S. Culliton, Roelof de Jong, Willem H. de Vries, Victor P. Debattista, Francisco Delgado, Ian P. Dell'Antonio, Saurav Dhital, Rosanne Di Stefano, Mark Dickinson, Benjamin Dilday, S.G. Djorgovski, Gregory Dobler, Ciro Donalek, Gregory Dubois-Felsmann, Josef Durech, Ardis Eliasdottir, Michael Eracleous, Laurent Eyer, Emilio E. Falco, Xiaohui Fan, Christopher D. Fassnacht, Harry C. Ferguson, Yanga R. Fernandez, Brian D. Fields, Douglas Finkbeiner, Eduardo E. Figueroa, Derek B. Fox, Harold Francke, James S. Frank, Josh Frieman, Sebastien Fromenteau, Muhammad Furqan, Gaspar Galaz, A. Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Eric Gawiser, John Geary, Perry Gee, Robert R. Gibson, Kirk Gilmore, Emily A. Grace, Richard F. Green, William J. Gressler, Carl J. Grillmair, Salman Habib, J. S. Haggerty, Mario Hamuy, Alan W. Harris, Suzanne L. Hawley, Alan F. Heavens, Leslie Hebb, Todd J. Henry, Edward Hileman, Eric J. Hilton, Keri Hoadley, J. B. Holberg, Matt J. Holman, Steve B. Howell, Leopoldo Infante, Zeljko Ivezic, Suzanne H. Jacoby, Bhuvnesh Jain, R, Jedicke, M. James Jee, J. Garrett Jernigan, Saurabh W. Jha, Kathryn V. Johnston, R. Lynne Jones, Mario Juric, Mikko Kaasalainen, Styliani Kafka, Steven M. Kahn, Nathan A. Kaib, Jason Kalirai, Jeff Kantor, Mansi M. Kasliwal, Charles R. Keeton, Richard Kessler, Zoran Knezevic, Adam Kowalski, Victor L. Krabbendam, K. Simon Krughoff, Shrinivas Kulkarni, Stephen Kuhlman, Mark Lacy, Sebastien Lepine, Ming Liang, Amy Lien, Paulina Lira, Knox S. Long, Suzanne Lorenz, Jennifer M. Lotz, R. H. Lupton, Julie Lutz, Lucas M. Macri, Ashish A. Mahabal, Rachel Mandelbaum, Phil Marshall, Morgan May, Peregrine M. McGehee, Brian T. Meadows, Alan Meert, Andrea Milani, Christopher J. Miller, Michelle Miller, David Mills, Dante Minniti, David Monet, Anjum S. Mukadam, Ehud Nakar, Douglas R. Neill, Jeffrey A. Newman, Sergei Nikolaev, Martin Nordby, Paul O'Connor, Masamune Oguri, John Oliver, Scot S. Olivier, Julia K. Olsen, Knut Olsen, Edward W. Olszewski, Hakeem Oluseyi, Nelson D. Padilla, Alex Parker, Joshua Pepper, John R. Peterson, Catherine Petry, Philip A. Pinto, James L. Pizagno, Bogdan Popescu, Andrej Prsa, Veljko Radcka, M. Jordan Raddick, Andrew Rasmussen, Arne Rau, Jeonghee Rho, James E. Rhoads, Gordon T. Richards, Stephen T. Ridgway, Brant E. Robertson, Rok Roskar, Abhijit Saha, Ata Sarajedini, Evan Scannapieco, Terry Schalk, Rafe Schindler, Samuel Schmidt, Sarah Schmidt, Donald P. Schneider, German Schumacher, Ryan Scranton, Jacques Sebag, Lynn G. Seppala, Ohad Shemmer, Joshua D. Simon, M. Sivertz, Howard A. Smith, J. Allyn Smith, Nathan Smith, Anna H. Spitz, Adam Stanford, Keivan G. Stassun, Jay Strader, Michael A. Strauss, Christopher W. Stubbs, Donald W. Sweeney, Alex Szalay, Paula Szkody, Masahiro Takada, Paul Thorman, David E. Trilling, Virginia Trimble, Anthony Tyson, Richard Van Berg, Daniel Vanden Berk, Jake VanderPlas, Licia Verde, Bojan Vrsnak, Lucianne M. Walkowicz, Benjamin D. Wandelt, Sheng Wang, Yun Wang, Michael Warner, Risa H. Wechsler, Andrew A. West, Oliver Wiecha, Benjamin F. Williams, Beth Willman, David Wittman, Sidney C. Wolff, W. Michael Wood-Vasey, Przemek Wozniak, Patrick Young, Andrew Zentner, Hu Zhan
    A survey that can cover the sky in optical bands over wide fields to faint magnitudes with a fast cadence will enable many of the exciting science opportunities of the next decade. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will have an effective aperture of 6.7 meters and an imaging camera with field of view of 9.6 deg^2, and will be devoted to a ten-year imaging survey over 20,000 deg^2 south of +15 deg. Each pointing will be imaged 2000 times with fifteen second exposures in six broad bands from 0.35 to 1.1 microns, to a total point-source depth of r~27.5. The LSST Science Book describes the basic parameters of the LSST hardware, software, and observing plans. The book discusses educational and outreach opportunities, then goes on to describe a broad range of science that LSST will revolutionize: mapping the inner and outer Solar System, stellar populations in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, the structure of the Milky Way disk and halo and other objects in the Local Volume, transient and variable objects both at low and high redshift, and the properties of normal and active galaxies at low and high redshift. It then turns to far-field cosmological topics, exploring properties of supernovae to z~1, strong and weak lensing, the large-scale distribution of galaxies and baryon oscillations, and how these different probes may be combined to constrain cosmological models and the physics of dark energy.