• The search of life in the Universe is a fundamental problem of astrobiology and a major priority for NASA. A key area of major progress since the NASA Astrobiology Strategy 2015 (NAS15) has been a shift from the exoplanet discovery phase to a phase of characterization and modeling of the physics and chemistry of exoplanetary atmospheres, and the development of observational strategies for the search for life in the Universe by combining expertise from four NASA science disciplines including heliophysics, astrophysics, planetary science and Earth science. The NASA Nexus for Exoplanetary System Science (NExSS) has provided an efficient environment for such interdisciplinary studies. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles produce disturbances in interplanetary space collectively referred to as space weather, which interacts with the Earth upper atmosphere and causes dramatic impact on space and ground-based technological systems. Exoplanets within close in habitable zones around M dwarfs and other active stars are exposed to extreme ionizing radiation fluxes, thus making exoplanetary space weather (ESW) effects a crucial factor of habitability. In this paper, we describe the recent developments and provide recommendations in this interdisciplinary effort with the focus on the impacts of ESW on habitability, and the prospects for future progress in searching for signs of life in the Universe as the outcome of the NExSS workshop held in Nov 29 - Dec 2, 2016, New Orleans, LA. This is one of five Life Beyond the Solar System white papers submitted by NExSS to the National Academy of Sciences in support of the Astrobiology Science Strategy for the Search for Life in the Universe.
  • New results are reported from the operation of the PICO-60 dark matter detector, a bubble chamber filled with 52 kg of C$_3$F$_8$ located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory. As in previous PICO bubble chambers, PICO-60 C$_3$F$_8$ exhibits excellent electron recoil and alpha decay rejection, and the observed multiple-scattering neutron rate indicates a single-scatter neutron background of less than 1 event per month. A blind analysis of an efficiency-corrected 1167-kg-day exposure at a 3.3-keV thermodynamic threshold reveals no single-scattering nuclear recoil candidates, consistent with the predicted background. These results set the most stringent direct-detection constraint to date on the WIMP-proton spin-dependent cross section at 3.4 $\times$ 10$^{-41}$ cm$^2$ for a 30-GeV$\thinspace$c$^{-2}$ WIMP, more than one order of magnitude improvement from previous PICO results.
  • A 30-g xenon bubble chamber, operated at Northwestern University in June and November 2016, has for the first time observed simultaneous bubble nucleation and scintillation by nuclear recoils in a superheated liquid. This chamber is instrumented with a CCD camera for near-IR bubble imaging, a solar-blind photomultiplier tube to detect 175-nm xenon scintillation light, and a piezoelectric acoustic transducer to detect the ultrasonic emission from a growing bubble. The time of nucleation determined from the acoustic signal is used to correlate specific scintillation pulses with bubble-nucleating events. We report on data from this chamber for thermodynamic "Seitz" thresholds from 4.2 to 15.0 keV. The observed single- and multiple-bubble rates when exposed to a $^{252}$Cf neutron source indicate that, for an 8.3-keV thermodynamic threshold, the minimum nuclear recoil energy required to nucleate a bubble is $19\pm6$ keV (1$\sigma$ uncertainty). This is consistent with the observed scintillation spectrum for bubble-nucleating events. We see no evidence for bubble nucleation by gamma rays at any of the thresholds studied, setting a 90% C.L. upper limit of $6.3\times10^{-7}$ bubbles per gamma interaction at a 4.2-keV thermodynamic threshold. This indicates stronger gamma discrimination than in CF$_3$I bubble chambers, supporting the hypothesis that scintillation production suppresses bubble nucleation by electron recoils while nuclear recoils nucleate bubbles as usual. These measurements establish the noble-liquid bubble chamber as a promising new technology for the detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter and coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.
  • We perform and analyze results of a global magnetohydrodyanmic (MHD) simulation of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 March 7. The simulation is made using the newly developed Alfv\'en Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), which describes the background solar wind starting from the upper chromosphere and extends to 24 R$_{\odot}$. Coupling AWSoM to an inner heliosphere (IH) model with the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) extends the total domain beyond the orbit of Earth. Physical processes included in the model are multi-species thermodynamics, electron heat conduction (both collisional and collisionless formulations), optically thin radiative cooling, and Alfv\'en-wave turbulence that accelerates and heats the solar wind. The Alfv\'en-wave description is physically self-consistent, including non-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) reflection and physics-based apportioning of turbulent dissipative heating to both electrons and protons. Within this model, we initiate the CME by using the Gibson-Low (GL) analytical flux rope model and follow its evolution for days, in which time it propagates beyond STEREO A. A detailed comparison study is performed using remote as well as \textit{in situ} observations. Although the flux rope structure is not compared directly due to lack of relevant ejecta observation at 1 AU in this event, our results show that the new model can reproduce many of the observed features near the Sun (e.g., CME-driven extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves, deflection of the flux rope from the coronal hole, "double-front" in the white light images) and in the heliosphere (e.g., shock propagation direction, shock properties at STEREO A).
  • We present a first-principles-based coronal mass ejection (CME) model suitable for both scientific and operational purposes by combining a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solar wind model with a flux rope-driven CME model. Realistic CME events are simulated self-consistently with high fidelity and forecasting capability by constraining initial flux rope parameters with observational data from GONG, SOHO/LASCO, and STEREO/COR. We automate this process so that minimum manual intervention is required in specifying the CME initial state. With the newly developed data-driven Eruptive Event Generator Gibson-Low (EEGGL), we present a method to derive Gibson-Low (GL) flux rope parameters through a handful of observational quantities so that the modeled CMEs can propagate with the desired CME speeds near the Sun. A test result with CMEs launched with different Carrington rotation magnetograms are shown. Our study shows a promising result for using the first-principles-based MHD global model as a forecasting tool, which is capable of predicting the CME direction of propagation, arrival time, and ICME magnetic field at 1 AU (see companion paper by Jin et al. 2016b).
  • A mechanism connecting ice algal ecodynamics with the buildup of organic macromolecules in brine channels is tested offline in a reduced model of pack geochemistry. Driver physical quantities are extracted from the global sea ice dynamics code CICE, including snow height, column thickness and internal temperature. The variables are averaged at the regional scale over ten Arctic biogeographic zones and treated as input matrices at four vertical habitat levels. Nutrient-light-salt limited ice algal growth is computed along with the associated grazing plus mortality. Vertical transport is diffusive but responds to pore structure. Simulated bottom layer chlorophyll maxima are reasonable, though delayed by about a month relative to observations. This highlights major uncertainties deriving from snow thickness variability. Upper level biota are generated intermittently through flooding. Macromolecular injections are represented by the compound classes humics, proteins, polysaccharides and lipids. The fresh biopolymers behave in a successional manner and are removed by bacteria. In baseline runs, organics are introduced solely through cell disruption, and internal carbon is biased low. Continuous exudation is therefore appended, and agreement with dissolved organic or individual biopolymer measurements is achieved when strong release is coupled to light availability. Detrital carbon then reaches hundreds of micromolar, sufficient to support physical changes to the ice matrix. Through this optimized model version we address the question, are high molecular weight organics added to the brine network over and above background spillage? The mechanism is configured for ready extension to the Antarctic, so that global ice organic chemistry issues can be targeted.
  • New data are reported from a second run of the 2-liter PICO-2L C$_3$F$_8$ bubble chamber with a total exposure of 129$\,$kg-days at a thermodynamic threshold energy of 3.3$\,$keV. These data show that measures taken to control particulate contamination in the superheated fluid resulted in the absence of the anomalous background events observed in the first run of this bubble chamber. One single nuclear-recoil event was observed in the data, consistent both with the predicted background rate from neutrons and with the observed rate of unambiguous multiple-bubble neutron scattering events. The chamber exhibits the same excellent electron-recoil and alpha decay rejection as was previously reported. These data provide the most stringent direct detection constraints on weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-proton spin-dependent scattering to date for WIMP masses $<$ 50$\,$GeV/c$^2$.
  • With the global view and high-cadence observations from SDO/AIA and STEREO, many spatially separated solar eruptive events appear to be coupled. However, the mechanisms for "sympathetic" events are still largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the impact of an erupting flux rope on surrounding solar structures through large-scale magnetic coupling. We build a realistic environment of the solar corona on 2011 February 15 using a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model and initiate coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in active region (AR) 11158 by inserting Gibson-Low analytical flux ropes. We show that a CME's impact on the surrounding structures depends not only on the magnetic strength of these structures and their distance to the source region, but also on the interaction between the CME with the large-scale magnetic field. Within the CME expansion domain where the flux rope field directly interacts with the solar structures, expansion-induced reconnection often modifies the overlying field, thereby increasing the decay index. This effect may provide a primary coupling mechanism underlying the sympathetic eruptions. The magnitude of the impact is found to depend on the orientation of the erupting flux rope, with the largest impacts occurring when the flux rope is favorably oriented for reconnecting with the surrounding regions. Outside the CME expansion domain, the influence of the CME is mainly through field line compression or post-eruption relaxation. Based on our numerical experiments, we discuss a way to quantify the eruption impact, which could be useful for forecasting purposes.
  • New data are reported from the operation of the PICO-60 dark matter detector, a bubble chamber filled with 36.8 kg of CF$_3$I and located in the SNOLAB underground laboratory. PICO-60 is the largest bubble chamber to search for dark matter to date. With an analyzed exposure of 92.8 livedays, PICO-60 exhibits the same excellent background rejection observed in smaller bubble chambers. Alpha decays in PICO-60 exhibit frequency-dependent acoustic calorimetry, similar but not identical to that reported recently in a C$_3$F$_8$ bubble chamber. PICO-60 also observes a large population of unknown background events, exhibiting acoustic, spatial, and timing behaviors inconsistent with those expected from a dark matter signal. These behaviors allow for analysis cuts to remove all background events while retaining $48.2\%$ of the exposure. Stringent limits on weakly interacting massive particles interacting via spin-dependent proton and spin-independent processes are set, and most interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA modulation signal as dark matter interacting with iodine nuclei are ruled out.
  • New data are reported from the operation of a 2-liter C$_3$F$_8$ bubble chamber in the 2100 meter deep SNOLAB underground laboratory, with a total exposure of 211.5 kg-days at four different recoil energy thresholds ranging from 3.2 keV to 8.1 keV. These data show that C3F8 provides excellent electron recoil and alpha rejection capabilities at very low thresholds, including the first observation of a dependence of acoustic signal on alpha energy. Twelve single nuclear recoil event candidates were observed during the run. The candidate events exhibit timing characteristics that are not consistent with the hypothesis of a uniform time distribution, and no evidence for a dark matter signal is claimed. These data provide the most sensitive direct detection constraints on WIMP-proton spin-dependent scattering to date, with significant sensitivity at low WIMP masses for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering.
  • We describe, analyze and validate the recently developed Alfv\'en Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), a 3D global model starting from the top of the chromosphere and extending into interplanetary space (up to 1-2 AU). This model solves the extended two temperature magnetohydrodynamics equations coupled to a wave kinetic equation for low frequency Alfv\'en waves. In this picture, heating and acceleration of the plasma are due to wave dissipation and wave pressure gradients, respectively. The dissipation process is described by a fully developed turbulent cascade of counter-propagating waves. We adopt a unified approach for calculating the wave dissipation in both open and closed magnetic field lines, allowing for a self-consistent treatment of any magnetic topology. Wave dissipation is the only heating mechanism assumed in the model, and no geometric heating functions are invoked. Electron heat conduction and radiative cooling are also included. We demonstrate that the large-scale, steady-state (in the co-rotating frame) properties of the solar environment are reproduced, using three adjustable parameters: the Poynting flux of chromospheric Alfv\'en waves, the perpendicular correlation length of the turbulence, and a pseudo-reflection coefficient. We compare model results for Carrington Rotation 2063 (November-December 2007) to remote observations in the EUV and X-ray ranges from STEREO, SOHO and Hinode spacecraft, as well as to in-situ measurements performed by Ulysses. The model results are in good agreement with observations. This is the first global model capable of simultaneously reproducing the multi-wavelength observations of the lower corona and the wind structure beyond Earth's orbit.
  • We study the correlation heights, which indicate the formation height of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lines in an active region using observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board \emph{Hinode}. The nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) optimization method is adopted to extrapolate the 3D magnetic fields to higher layers. Three subregions with different characteristics are selected in the active region for this study. The results show that the formation heights in different subregions vary with their different magnetic fields or velocity patterns. After solving the line blending problem between the He {\sc \romannumeral 2} 256.32 \AA and Si {\sc \romannumeral 10} 256.37 \AA lines by the double Gaussian curve fitting, we find that the transition region lies higher in a strong magnetic area. In a pre-flare heating area there possibly exist multithermal loops as implied by comparing the Doppler velocity and the magnetic field on the solar disk.