• Magneto-static models may overcome some of the issues facing force-free magnetic field extrapolations. So far they have seen limited use and have faced problems when applied to quiet-Sun data. Here we present a first application to an active region. We use solar vector magnetic field measurements gathered by the IMaX polarimeter during the flight of the \sunrise{} balloon-borne solar observatory in June 2013 as boundary condition for a magneto-static model of the higher solar atmosphere above an active region. The IMaX data are embedded in active region vector magnetograms observed with SDO/HMI. This work continues our magneto-static extrapolation approach, which has been applied earlier ({\it Paper I}) to a quiet Sun region observed with \sunrise{} I. In an active region the signal-to-noise-ratio in the measured Stokes parameters is considerably higher than in the quiet Sun and consequently the IMaX measurements of the horizontal photospheric magnetic field allow us to specify the free parameters of the model in a special class of linear magneto-static equilibria. The high spatial resolution of IMaX (110-130 km, pixel size 40 km) enables us to model the non-force-free layer between the photosphere and the mid chromosphere vertically by about 50 grid points. In our approach we can incorporate some aspects of the mixed beta layer of photosphere and chromosphere, e.g., taking a finite Lorentz force into account, which was not possible with lower resolution photospheric measurements in the past. The linear model does not, however, permit to model intrinsic nonlinear structures like strongly localized electric currents.
  • We report the detection of oscillations in slender Ca II H fibrils (SCFs) from high-resolution observations acquired with the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. The SCFs show obvious oscillations in their intensity, but also their width. The oscillatory behaviors are investigated at several positions along the axes of the SCFs. A large majority of fibrils show signs of oscillations in intensity. Their periods and phase speeds are analyzed using a wavelet analysis. The width and intensity perturbations have overlapping distributions of the wave period. The obtained distributions have median values of the period of $32\pm17$s and $36\pm25$s, respectively. We find that the fluctuations of both parameters propagate in the SCFs with speeds of ${11}^{+49}_{-11}$ km/s and ${15}^{+34}_{-15}$ km/s, respectively. Furthermore, the width and intensity oscillations have a strong tendency to be either in anti-phase, or, to a smaller extent, in phase. This suggests that the oscillations of both parameters are caused by the same wave mode and that the waves are likely propagating. Taking all the evidence together, the most likely wave mode to explain all measurements and criteria is the fast sausage mode.
  • The SUNRISE balloon-borne solar observatory, consisting of a 1~m aperture telescope that provided a stabilized image to a UV filter imager and an imaging vector polarimeter, carried out its second science flight in June 2013. It provided observations of parts of active regions at high spatial resolution, including the first high-resolution images in the Mg~{\sc ii}~k line. The obtained data are of very high quality, with the best UV images reaching the diffraction limit of the telescope at 3000~\AA\ after Multi-Frame Blind Deconvolution reconstruction accounting for phase-diversity information. Here a brief update is given of the instruments and the data reduction techniques, which includes an inversion of the polarimetric data. Mainly those aspects that evolved compared with the first flight are described. A tabular overview of the observations is given. In addition, an example time series of a part of the emerging active region NOAA AR~11768 observed relatively close to disk centre is described and discussed in some detail. The observations cover the pores in the trailing polarity of the active region, as well as the polarity inversion line where flux emergence was ongoing and a small flare-like brightening occurred in the course of the time series. The pores are found to contain magnetic field strengths ranging up to 2500~G and, while large pores are clearly darker and cooler than the quiet Sun in all layers of the photosphere, the temperature and brightness of small pores approach or even exceed those of the quiet Sun in the upper photosphere.
  • We use seeing-free high spatial resolution Ca II H data obtained by the SUNRISE observatory to determine properties of slender fibrils in the lower solar chromosphere. In this work we use intensity images taken with the SUFI instrument in the Ca II H line during the second scientific flight of the SUNRISE observatory to identify and track elongated bright structures. After the identification, we analyze theses structures in order to extract their morphological properties. We identify 598 slender Ca II H fibrils (SCFs) with an average width of around 180 km, a length between 500 km and 4000 km, an average lifetime of ~400 s, and an average curvature of 0.002 arcsec^-1. The maximum lifetime of the SCFs within our time series of 57 minutes is ~2000 s. We discuss similarities and differences of the SCFs with other small-scale, chromospheric structures such as spicules of type I and II, or Ca II K fibrils.
  • We study the dynamics and topology of an emerging magnetic flux concentration using high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment on board the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. We obtain the full vector magnetic field and the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity through inversions of the Fe I line at 525.02 nm with the SPINOR code. The derived vector magnetic field is used to trace magnetic field lines. Two magnetic flux concentrations with different polarity and LOS velocities are found to be connected by a group of arch-shaped magnetic field lines. The positive polarity footpoint is weaker (1100 G) and displays an upflow, while the negative polarity footpoint is stronger (2200 G) and shows a downflow. This configuration is naturally interpreted as a siphon flow along an arched magnetic flux tube.
  • We present a new method of Stokes inversion of spectropolarimetric data and evaluate it by taking the example of a SUNRISE/IMaX observation. An archive of synthetic Stokes profiles is obtained by the spectral synthesis of state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations and a realistic degradation to the level of the observed data. The definition of a merit function allows the archive to be searched for the synthetic Stokes profiles that match the observed profiles best. In contrast to traditional Stokes inversion codes, which solve the Unno-Rachkovsky equations for the polarized radiative transfer numerically and fit the Stokes profiles iteratively, the new technique provides the full set of atmospheric parameters. This gives us the ability to start an MHD simulation that takes the inversion result as initial condition. After a relaxation process of half an hour solar time we obtain physically consistent MHD data sets with a target similar to the observation. The new MHD simulation is used to repeat the method in a second iteration, which further improves the match between observation and simulation, resulting in a factor of 2.2 lower mean $\chi^2$ value. One advantage of the new technique is that it provides the physical parameters on a geometrical height scale. It constitutes a first step towards inversions giving results consistent with the MHD equations.
  • Spectropolarimetric observations from Sunrise II/IMaX obtained in June 2013 are used for a statistical analysis to determine the physical properties of moving magnetic features (MMFs) observed near a pore. MMFs of the same and opposite polarity with respect to the pore are found to stream from its border at an average speed of 1.3 km s$^{-1}$ and 1.2 km s$^{-1}$ respectively, with mainly same-polarity MMFs found further away from the pore. MMFs of both polarities are found to harbor rather weak, inclined magnetic fields. Opposite-polarity MMFs are blue-shifted, while same-polarity MMFs do not show any preference for up- or downflows. Most of the MMFs are found to be of sub-arcsecond size and carry a mean flux of $\sim$ 1.2$\times 10^{17}$ Mx.
  • Ellerman Bombs are signatures of magnetic reconnection, which is an important physical process in the solar atmosphere. How and where they occur is a subject of debate. In this paper we analyse Sunrise/IMaX data together with 3D MHD simulations that aim to reproduce the exact scenario proposed for the formation of these features. Although the observed event seems to be more dynamic and violent than the simulated one, simulations clearly confirm the basic scenario for the production of EBs. The simulations also reveal the full complexity of the underlying process. The simulated observations show that the Fe I 525.02 nm line gives no information on the height where reconnection takes place. It can only give clues about the heating in the aftermath of the reconnection. The information on the magnetic field vector and velocity at this spatial resolution is, however, extremely valuable because it shows what numerical models miss and how they can be improved.
  • We present the first high-resolution solar images in the Mg II k 2796 \AA{} line. The images, taken through a 4.8 \AA{} broad interference filter, were obtained during the second science flight of SUNRISE in June 2013 by the SuFI instrument. The Mg II k images display structures that look qualitatively very similar to images taken in the core of Ca II H. The Mg II images exhibit reversed granulation (or shock waves) in the internetwork regions of the quiet Sun, at intensity contrasts that are similar to those found in Ca II H. Very prominent in Mg II are bright points, both in the quiet Sun and in plage regions, particularly near disk center. These are much brighter than at other wavelengths sampled at similar resolution. Furthermore, Mg II k images also show fibril structures associated with plage regions. Again, the fibrils are similar to those seen in Ca II H images, but tend to be more pronounced, particularly in weak plage.
  • We report on magnetic field emergences covering significant areas of exploding granules. The balloon-borne mission SUNRISE provided high spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar photosphere. Continuum images, longitudinal and transverse magnetic field maps and Dopplergrams obtained by IMaX onboard SUNRISE are analyzed by Local Correlation Traking (LCT), divergence calculation and time slices, Stokes inversions and numerical simulations are also employed. We characterize two mesogranular-scale exploding granules where $\sim$ 10$^{18}$ Mx of magnetic flux emerges. The emergence of weak unipolar longitudinal fields ($\sim$100 G) start with a single visible magnetic polarity, occupying their respective granules' top and following the granular splitting. After a while, mixed polarities start appearing, concentrated in downflow lanes. The events last around 20 min. LCT analyses confirm mesogranular scale expansion, displaying a similar pattern for all the physical properties, and divergence centers match between all of them. We found a similar behaviour with the emergence events in a numerical MHD simulation. Granule expansion velocities are around 1 \kms while magnetic patches expand at 0.65 \kms. One of the analyzed events evidences the emergence of a loop-like structure. Advection of the emerging magnetic flux features is dominated by convective motion resulting from the exploding granule due to the magnetic field frozen in the granular plasma. Intensification of the magnetic field occurs in the intergranular lanes, probably because of being directed by the downflowing plasma.
  • We report on the photospheric evolution of an intermediate-scale (~4 Mm footpoint separation) magnetic bipole, from emergence to decay, observed in the quiet Sun at high spatial 0".3 and temporal (33 s) resolution. The observations were acquired by the IMaX imaging magnetograph during the first science flight of the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. The bipole flux content is 6 x 10^17 Mx, representing a structure bridging the gap between granular scale bipoles and the smaller ephemeral regions. Footpoints separate at a speed of 3.5 km s-1 and reach a maximum distance of 4.5 Mm before the field dissolves. The evolution of the bipole is revealed to be very dynamic: we found a proper motion of the bipole axis and detected a change of the azimuth angle of 90{\deg} in 300 seconds. The overall morphology and behaviour are in agreement with previous analyses of bipolar structures emerging at granular scale, but we also found several similarities with emerging flux structures at larger scale. The flux growth rate is 2.6 x 15 Mx s-1, while the mean decay rate is one order of magnitude smaller. We describe in some detail the decay phase of the bipole footpoints which includes break up into smaller structures, interaction with pre-existing fields leading to cancellation but appears to be dominated by an as-yet unidentified diffusive process that removes most of the flux with an exponential flux decay curve. The diffusion constant (8 x 10^2 km^2 s-1) associated with this decay is similar to the values used to describe the large scale diffusion in flux transport models.
  • The relation of the solar surface magnetic field with mesogranular cells is studied using high spatial (~ 100 km) and temporal (~ 30 sec) resolution data obtained with the IMaX instrument aboard SUNRISE. First, mesogranular cells are identified using Lagrange tracers (corks) based on horizontal velocity fields obtained through Local Correlation Tracking. After ~ 20 min of integration, the tracers delineate a sharp mesogranular network with lanes of width below about 280 km. The preferential location of magnetic elements in mesogranular cells is tested quantitatively. Roughly 85% of pixels with magnetic field higher than 100 G are located in the near neighborhood of mesogranular lanes. Magnetic flux is therefore concentrated in mesogranular lanes rather than intergranular ones. Secondly, magnetic field extrapolations are performed to obtain field lines anchored in the observed flux elements. This analysis, therefore, is independent of the horizontal flows determined in the first part. A probability density function (PDF) is calculated for the distribution of distances between the footpoints of individual magnetic field lines. The PDF has an exponential shape at scales between 1 and 10 Mm, with a constant characteristic decay distance, indicating the absence of preferred convection scales in the mesogranular range. Our results support the view that mesogranulation is not an intrinsic convective scale (in the sense that it is not a primary energy-injection scale of solar convection), but also give quantitative confirmation that, nevertheless, the magnetic elements are preferentially found along mesogranular lanes.
  • Solar oscillations are expected to be excited by turbulent flows in the intergranular lanes near the solar surface. Time series recorded by the IMaX instrument aboard the {\sc Sunrise} observatory reveal solar oscillations at high resolution, which allow studying the properties of oscillations with short wavelengths. We analyze two times series with synchronous recordings of Doppler velocity and continuum intensity images with durations of 32\thinspace min and 23\thinspace min, resp., recorded close to the disk center of the Sun to study the propagation and excitation of solar acoustic oscillations. In the Doppler velocity data, both the standing acoustic waves and the short-lived, high-degree running waves are visible. The standing waves are visible as temporary enhancements of the amplitudes of the large-scale velocity field due to the stochastic superposition of the acoustic waves. We focus on the high-degree small-scale waves by suitable filtering in the Fourier domain. Investigating the propagation and excitation of $f$- and $p_1$-modes with wave numbers $k > 1.4$\thinspace 1/Mm we find that also exploding granules contribute to the excitation of solar $p$-modes in addition to the contribution of intergranular lanes.
  • Bright points (BPs) are manifestations of small magnetic elements in the solar photosphere. Their brightness contrast not only gives insight into the thermal state of the photosphere (and chromosphere) in magnetic elements, but also plays an important role in modulating the solar total and spectral irradiance. Here we report on simultaneous high-resolution imaging and spectropolarimetric observations of BPs using Sunrise balloon-borne observatory data of the quiet Sun at disk center. BP contrasts have been measured between 214 nm and 525 nm, including the first measurements at wavelengths below 388 nm. The histograms of the BP peak brightness show a clear trend toward broader contrast distributions and higher mean contrasts at shorter wavelengths. At 214 nm we observe a peak brightness of up to five times the mean quiet-Sun value, the highest BP contrast so far observed. All BPs are associated with a magnetic signal, although in a number of cases it is surprisingly weak. Most of the BPs show only weak downflows, the mean value being 240 m/s, but some display strong down- or upflows reaching a few km/s.
  • We have investigated a time series of continuum intensity maps and corresponding Dopplergrams of granulation in a very quiet solar region at the disk center, recorded with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment (IMaX) on board the balloon-borne solar observatory Sunrise. We find that granules frequently show substructure in the form of lanes composed of a leading bright rim and a trailing dark edge, which move together from the boundary of a granule into the granule itself. We find strikingly similar events in synthesized intensity maps from an ab initio numerical simulation of solar surface convection. From cross sections through the computational domain of the simulation, we conclude that these `granular lanes' are the visible signature of (horizontally oriented) vortex tubes. The characteristic optical appearance of vortex tubes at the solar surface is explained. We propose that the observed vortex tubes may represent only the large-scale end of a hierarchy of vortex tubes existing near the solar surface.
  • This paper describes the wave-front correction system developed for the Sunrise balloon telescope, and provides information about its in-flight performance. For the correction of low-order aberrations, a Correlating Wave-Front Sensor (CWS) was used. It consisted of a six-element Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (WFS), a fast tip-tilt mirror for the compensation of image motion, and an active telescope secondary mirror for focus correction. The CWS delivered a stabilized image with a precision of 0.04 arcsec (rms), whenever the coarse pointing was better than 90 arcsec peak-to-peak. The automatic focus adjustment maintained a focus stability of 0.01 waves in the focal plane of the CWS. During the 5.5 day flight, good image quality and stability was achieved during 33 hours, containing 45 sequences that lasted between 10 and 45 minutes.
  • The Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory consists of a 1m aperture Gregory telescope, a UV filter imager, an imaging vector polarimeter, an image stabilization system and further infrastructure. The first science flight of Sunrise yielded high-quality data that reveal the structure, dynamics and evolution of solar convection, oscillations and magnetic fields at a resolution of around 100 km in the quiet Sun. After a brief description of instruments and data, first qualitative results are presented. In contrast to earlier observations, we clearly see granulation at 214 nm. Images in Ca II H display narrow, short-lived dark intergranular lanes between the bright edges of granules. The very small-scale, mixed-polarity internetwork fields are found to be highly dynamic. A significant increase in detectable magnetic flux is found after phase-diversity-related reconstruction of polarization maps, indicating that the polarities are mixed right down to the spatial resolution limit, and probably beyond.
  • Sunspots are concentrations of magnetic field on the visible solar surface that strongly affect the convective energy transport in their interior and surroundings. The filamentary outer regions (penumbrae) of sunspots show systematic radial outward flows along channels of nearly horizontal magnetic field. These flows were discovered 100 years ago and are present in all fully developed sunspots. Using a comprehensive numerical simulation of a sunspot pair, we show that penumbral structures with such outflows form when the average magnetic field inclination to the vertical exceeds about 45 degrees. The systematic outflows are a component of the convective flows that provide the upward energy transport and result from anisotropy introduced by the presence of the inclined magnetic field.
  • The solar magnetic activity cycle is responsible for periodic episodes of severe space weather, which can perturb satellite orbits, interfere with communications systems, and bring down power grids. Much progress has recently been made in forecasting the strength and timing of this 11-year cycle, using a predictive flux-transport dynamo model (Dikpati 2005, Dikpati et al. 2006). We can strengthen the foundation of this model by extending it to match observations of similar magnetic activity cycles in other Sun-like stars, which exhibit variations in their Ca II H and K emission on time scales from 2.5 to 25 years (Baliunas et al. 1995). This broad range of cycle periods is thought to reflect differences in the rotational properties and the depth of the surface convection zone for stars with various masses and ages. Asteroseismology is now yielding direct measurements of these quantities for individual stars, but the most promising asteroseismic targets are in the southern sky (alpha Cen A, alpha Cen B, beta Hyi), while the existing activity cycle survey is confined to the north. We are initiating a long-term survey of Ca II H and K emission for a sample of 92 southern Sun-like stars to measure their magnetic activity cycles and rotational properties, which will ultimately provide independent tests of solar dynamo models.