• We report the first observation of 3$-$30 MeV prolonged gamma-ray emission that was abruptly terminated by lightning. The gamma-ray detection was made during winter thunderstorms on December 30, 2010 by the Gamma-Ray Observation of Winter THunderclouds (GROWTH) experiment carried out in a coastal area along the Sea of Japan. The gamma-ray flux lasted for less than 3 min, continuously hardening closer to the lightning occurrence. The hardening at energies of 3$-$10 MeV energies was most prominent. The gamma-ray flux abruptly ceased less than 800 ms before the lightning flash that occurred over 5 km away from the experimental site. In addition, we observed a clear difference in the duration of the 3$-$10 MeV gamma rays and those $>$10 MeV, suggesting that the area of $>$10 MeV gamma-ray emission is considerably smaller than that of the lower-energy gamma rays. This work may give a manifestation that a local region emitting prolonged gamma rays connects with a distant region to initiate lightning.
  • The Gamma-Ray Observation of Winter THunderclouds (GROWTH) experiment, consisting of two radiation-detection subsystems, has been operating since 2006 on the premises of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant located at the coastal area of Japan Sea. By 2010 February, GROWTH detected 7 long-duration $\gamma$-rays emissions associated with winter thunderstorms. Of them, two events, obtained on 2007 December 13 and 2008 December 25, are reported.On both occasions, all inorganic scintillators (NaI, CsI, and BGO) of the two subsystems detected significant gamma-ray signals lasting for >1 minute. Neither of these two events were associated with any lightning. In both cases, the gamma-ray energy spectra extend to 10 MeV, suggesting that the detected gamma-rays are produced by relativistic electrons via bremsstrahlung. Assuming that the initial photon spectrum at the source is expressed by a power-law function,the observed photons can be interpreted as being radiated from a source located at a distance of 290-560 m for the 2007 event and 110-690 m for the 2008 one, both at 90% confidence level.Employing these photon spectra, the number of relativistic electrons is estimated as 10^9 - 10^{11}. The estimation generally agrees with those calculated based on the relativistic runaway electron avalanche model. A GROWTH photon spectrum, summed over 3 individual events including the present two events and another reported previously, has similar features including a cut-off energy, to an averaged spectrum of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes.
  • We present X-ray observations of the northern outskirts of the relaxed galaxy cluster A1413 with Suzaku, whose XIS instrument has the low intrinsic background needed to make measurements of these low surface brightness regions. We excise 15 point sources superimposed on the image above a flux of $1\times 10^{-14}$ \fluxunit (2--10keV) using XMM-Newton and Suzaku images of the cluster. We quantify all known systematic errors as part of our analysis, and show our statistical errors encompasses them for the most part. Our results extend previous measurements with Chandra and XMM-Newton, and show a significant temperature drop to about 3keV at the virial radius, $r_{200}$. Our entropy profile in the outer region ($> 0.5 r_{200}$) joins smoothly onto that of XMM-Newton, and shows a flatter slope compared with simple models, similar to a few other clusters observed at the virial radius. The integrated mass of the cluster at the virial radius is approximately $7.5\times10^{14}M_{\odot}$ and varies by about 30% depending on the particular method used to measure it.
  • Suzaku X-ray observations of a young supernova remnant, Cassiopeia A, were carried out. K-shell transition lines from highly ionized ions of various elements were detected, including Chromium (Cr-Kalpha at 5.61 keV). The X-ray continuum spectra were modeled in the 3.4--40 keV band, summed over the entire remnant, and were fitted with a simplest combination of the thermal bremsstrahlung and the non-thermal cut-off power-law models. The spectral fits with this assumption indicate that the continuum emission is likely to be dominated by the non-thermal emission with a cut-off energy at > 1 keV. The thermal-to-nonthermal fraction of the continuum flux in the 4-10 keV band is best estimated as ~0.1. Non-thermal-dominated continuum images in the 4--14 keV band were made. The peak of the non-thermal X-rays appears at the western part. The peak position of the TeV gamma-rays measured with HEGRA and MAGIC is also shifted at the western part with the 1-sigma confidence. Since the location of the X-ray continuum emission was known to be presumably identified with the reverse shock region, the possible keV-TeV correlations give a hint that the accelerated multi-TeV hadrons in Cassiopeia A are dominated by heavy elements in the reverse shock region.
  • We present the first Suzaku observation of the new Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 0501+4516, performed on 2008 August 26, four days after the onset of bursting activity of this new member of the magnetar family. The soft X-ray persistent emission was detected with the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) at a 0.5-10 keV flux of 3.8E-11 erg/s/cm2, with a spectrum well fitted by an absorbed blackbody plus power-law model. The source pulsation was confirmed at a period of 5.762072+/-0.000002 s, and 32 X-ray bursts were detected by the XIS, four of which were also detected at higher energies by the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD). The strongest burst, which occurred at 03:16:16.9 (UTC), was so bright that it caused instrumental saturation, but its precursor phase, lasting for about 200 ms, was detected successfully over the 0.5-200 keV range, with a fluence of ~2.1E-7 erg/cm2 and a peak intensity of about 89 Crab. The entire burst fluence is estimated to be ~50 times higher. The precursor spectrum was very hard, and well modeled by a combination of two blackbodies. We discuss the bursting activity and X/gamma-ray properties of this newly discovered Soft Gamma Repeater in comparison with other members of the class.
  • The broad-band 1-300 keV Suzaku spectrum of IGR J17497-2821, the X-ray transient discovered by INTEGRAL in September 2006, is presented. Suzaku observed IGR J17497-2821 on September 25, eight days after its discovery, for a net exposure of about 53 ksec. During the Suzaku observation, IGR J17497-2821 is very bright, 2 x 10^37 erg/s at 8 kpc in the 1-300 keV range, and shows a hard spectrum, typical of black hole candidates in the low-hard state. Despite the multi-mission X-ray monitoring of the source, only with Suzaku is it possible to obtain a broad-band spectrum in the 1-300 keV range with a very high signal to noise ratio. A sum of a multi-color disc (DISKBB) and a thermal Comptonization component (COMPPS) with mild reflection is a good representation of our IGR J17497-2821 Suzaku spectrum. The spectral properties of the accretion disc as well as the cut-off energy in the spectrum at about 150 keV are clearly detected and constrained. We discuss the implications on the physical model used to interpret the data and the comparison with previous results.
  • The NeXT (New exploration X-ray Telescope), the new Japanese X-ray Astronomy Satellite following Suzaku, is an international X-ray mission which is currently planed for launch in 2013. NeXT is a combination of wide band X-ray spectroscopy (3 - 80 keV) provided by multi-layer coating, focusing hard X-ray mirrors and hard X-ray imaging detectors, and high energy-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy (0.3 - 10 keV) provided by thin-foil X-ray optics and a micro-calorimeter array. The mission will also carry an X-ray CCD camera as a focal plane detector for a soft X-ray telescope and a non-focusing soft gamma-ray detector. With these instruments, NeXT covers very wide energy range from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. The micro-calorimeter system will be developed by international collaboration lead by ISAS/JAXA and NASA. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution of Delta E ~ 7 eV by the micro-calorimeter will enable a wide variety of important science themes to be pursued.
  • Tycho's supernova remnant was observed by the XIS and HXD instruments onboard the Suzaku satellite on 2006 June 26-29 for 92 ks. The spectrum up to 30 keV was well fitted with a two-component model, consisting of a power-law with photon index of 2.7 and a thermal bremsstrahlung model with temperature of 4.7 keV. The former component can alternatively be modeled as synchrotron emission from a population of relativistic electrons with an estimated roll-off energy of around 1 keV. In the XIS spectra, in addition to the prominent Fe K_alpha line (6.445 keV), we observe for the first time significant K_alpha line emission from the trace species Cr and Mn at energies of 5.48 keV and 5.95 keV, respectively. Faint K_beta lines from Ca (4.56 keV) and Fe (7.11 keV) are also seen. The ionization states of Cr and Mn, based on their line centroids, are estimated to be similar to that of Fe K_alpha (Fe XV or XVI).
  • The Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) is a function of the large lateral BGO shield of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) onboard Suzaku. Its large geometrical area of 800 cm^2 per side, the large stopping power for the hard X-rays and the wide-field of view make the WAM an ideal detector for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observations in the energy range of 50-5000 keV. In fact, the WAM has observed 288 GRBs confirmed by other satellites, till the end of May 2007.
  • A report is made on a comprehensive observation of a burst-like $\gamma$-ray emission from thunderclouds on the Sea of Japan, during strong thunderstorms on 2007 January 6. The detected emission, lasting for $\sim$40 seconds, preceded cloud-to-ground lightning discharges. The burst spectrum, extending to 10 MeV, can be interpreted as consisting of bremsstrahlung photons originating from relativistic electrons. This ground-based observation provides first clear evidence that strong electric fields in thunderclouds can continuously accelerate electrons beyond 10 MeV prior to lightning discharges.
  • The Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board Suzaku covers a wide energy range from 10 keV to 600 keV by combination of silicon PIN diodes and GSO scintillators. The HXD is designed to achieve an extremely low in-orbit back ground based on a combination of new techniques, including the concept of well-type active shield counter. With an effective area of 142 cm^2 at 20 keV and 273 cm2 at 150 keV, the background level at the sea level reached ~1x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 30 keV for the PI N diodes, and ~2x10^{-5} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 100 keV, and ~7x10^{-6} cts s^{-1} cm^{-2} keV^{-1} at 200 keV for the phoswich counter. Tight active shielding of the HXD results in a large array of guard counters surrounding the main detector parts. These anti-coincidence counters, made of ~4 cm thick BGO crystals, have a large effective area for sub-MeV to MeV gamma-rays. They work as an excellent gamma-ray burst monitor with limited angular resolution (~5 degree). The on-board signal-processing system and the data transmitted to the ground are also described.
  • The in-orbit performance and calibration of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) on board the X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku are described. Its basic performances, including a wide energy bandpass of 10-600 keV, energy resolutions of ~4 keV (FWHM) at 40 keV and ~11% at 511 keV, and a high background rejection efficiency, have been confirmed by extensive in-orbit calibrations. The long-term gains of PIN-Si diodes have been stable within 1% for half a year, and those of scintillators have decreased by 5-20%. The residual non-X-ray background of the HXD is the lowest among past non-imaging hard X-ray instruments in energy ranges of 15-70 and 150-500 keV. We provide accurate calibrations of energy responses, angular responses, timing accuracy of the HXD, and relative normalizations to the X-ray CCD cameras using multiple observations of the Crab Nebula.
  • Two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in the nearby Sb galaxy NGC 1313, named X-1 and X-2, were observed with Suzaku on 2005 September 15. During the observation for a net exposure of 28~ks (but over a gross time span of 90~ks), both objects varied in intensity by about 50~%. The 0.4--10 keV X-ray luminosity of X-1 and X-2 was measured as $2.5 \times 10^{40}~{\rm erg~s^{-1}}$ and $5.8 \times 10^{39}~{\rm erg~s^{-1}}$, respectively, with the former the highest ever reported for this ULX. The spectrum of X-1 can be explained by a sum of a strong and variable power-law component with a high energy cutoff, and a stable multicolor blackbody with an innermost disk temperature of $\sim 0.2$ keV. These results suggest that X-1 was in a ``very high'' state, where the disk emission is strongly Comptonized. The absorber within NGC 1313 toward X-1 is suggested to have a subsolar oxygen abundance. The spectrum of X-2 is best represented, in its fainter phase, by a multicolor blackbody model with the innermost disk temperature of 1.2--1.3 keV, and becomes flatter as the source becomes brighter. Hence X-2 is interpreted to be in a slim-disk state. These results suggest that the two ULXs have black hole masses of a few tens to a few hundreds solar masses.
  • The NeXT mission has been proposed to study high-energy non-thermal phenomena in the universe. The high-energy response of the super mirror will enable us to perform the first sensitive imaging observations up to 80 keV. The focal plane detector, which combines a fully depleted X-ray CCD and a pixellated CdTe detector, will provide spectra and images in the wide energy range from 0.5 keV to 80 keV. In the soft gamma-ray band up to ~1 MeV, a narrow field-of-view Compton gamma-ray telescope utilizing several tens of layers of thin Si or CdTe detector will provide precise spectra with much higher sensitivity than present instruments. The continuum sensitivity will reach several times 10^(-8) photons/s/keV/cm^(2) in the hard X-ray region and a few times10^(-7) photons/s/keV/cm^(2) in the soft gamma-ray region.
  • We present an INTEGRAL observation of the Cen-Crux region in order to search the electron cyclotron resonance scattering features from the X-ray binary pulsars. During the AO1 200ks observation, we clearly detected 4 bright X-ray binaries, 1 Seyfert Galaxy, and 4 new sources in the field of view. Especially from GX301-2, the cyclotron resonance feature is detected at about 37 keV, and width of 3--4 keV. In addition, the depth of the resonance feature strongly depends on the X-ray luminosity. This is the first detection of luminosity dependence of the resonance depth. The cyclotron resonance feature is marginally detected from 1E1145.1-6141. Cen X-3 was very dim during the observation and poor statistics disable us to detect the resonance features.These are first INTEGRAL results of searching for the cyclotron resonance feature.