• Starting from the stochastic equation for the density operator, we formulate the exact (instantaneous) stress tensor for interacting Brownian particles, whose average value agrees with expressions derived previously. We analyze the relation between the stress tensor and forces on external potentials, and observe that, out of equilibrium, particle currents give rise to extra forces. Next, we derive the stress tensor for a Landau-Ginzburg theory in non-equilibrium situations, finding an expression analogous to that of the exact microscopic stress tensor, and discuss the computation of out-of-equilibrium (classical) Casimir forces. We use these relations to study the spatio-temporal correlations of the stress tensor in a Brownian fluid, which we derive exactly to leading order in the interaction potential strength. We observe that, after integration over time, the spatial correlations generally decay as power laws in space. These are expected to be of importance for driven confined systems. We also show that divergence-free parts of the stress tensor do not contribute in the Green-Kubo relation for the viscosity.
  • A comparison is made between the nonlinear rheological response of bulk metallic glass formers and of colloidal dispersions. Stress-strain curves measured after switch-on of constant deformation rates are analyzed quantitatively using a schematic model of mode coupling theory generalized to homogeneous and incompressible flows. A mapping between metallic and dispersion rheology is possible when stresses are rescaled by an entropic scale, accumulated strains by geometrical factors, and rates by the intrinsic relaxation time. Exploiting this similarity and the possibility to directly observe individual colloidal particles, we investigate the structural distortions in the colloidal system using confocal microscopy. The distortions exhibit the (from elasticity theory) expected quadrupolar but also a strong isotropic component.
  • Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this article we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as ATI and HHG. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nano physics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the induced fields and the unique electron dynamics initiated by them with high temporal and spatial resolution.
  • Quantum and thermal fluctuations of electromagnetic waves are the cornerstone of quantum and statistical physics, and inherent to such phenomena as thermal radiation and van der Waals forces. While the basic principles are the material of elementary texts, recent experimental and technological advances have made it necessary to come to terms with counterintuitive consequences of electromagnetic fluctuations at short scales -- in the so called {\it near-field} regime. We focus on three manifestations of such behavior: {\bf (i)} The Stefan--Boltzmann law describes thermal radiation from macroscopic bodies, but fails to account for magnitude, polarization and coherence of radiation from small objects (say compared to the skin depth). {\bf (ii)} The heat transfer between two bodies at similar close proximity is dominated by evanescent waves, and can be several orders of magnitude larger than the classical contribution due to propagating waves. {\bf (iii)} Casimir/van der Waals interactions are a dominant force between objects at sub-micron separation; the non-equilibrium analogs of this force (for objects at different temperatures) have not been sufficiently explored (at least experimentally). To explore these phenomena we introduce the tool of fluctuational quantum electrodynamics (QED) originally introduced by Rytov in the 1950s. Combined with a scattering formalism, this enables studies of heat radiation and transfer, equilibrium and non-equilibrium forces for objects of different material properties, shapes, separations and arrangements.
  • We present theoretical predictions of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) resulting from the interaction of short femtosecond laser pulses with metal nanotips. It has been demonstrated that high energy electrons can be generated using nanotips as sources; furthermore the recollision mechanism has been proven to be the physical mechanism behind this photoemission. If recollision exists, it should be possible to convert the laser-gained energy by the electron in the continuum in a high energy photon. Consequently the emission of harmonic radiation appears to be viable, although it has not been experimentally demonstrated hitherto. We employ a quantum mechanical time dependent approach to model the electron dipole moment including both the laser experimental conditions and the bulk matter properties. The use of metal tips shall pave a new way of generating coherent XUV light with a femtosecond laser field.
  • The history dependence of the glasses formed from flow-melted steady states by a sudden cessation of the shear rate $\dot\gamma$ is studied in colloidal suspensions, by molecular dynamics simulations, and mode-coupling theory. In an ideal glass, stresses relax only partially, leaving behind a finite persistent residual stress. For intermediate times, relaxation curves scale as a function of $\dot\gamma t$, even though no flow is present. The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this history dependence of glasses sharing the same thermodynamic state variables, but differing static properties.
  • Using a dynamical density functional theory we analyze the density profile of a colloidal liquid near a wall under shear flow. Due to the symmetries of the system considered, the naive application of dynamical density functional theory does not lead to a shear induced modification of the equilibrium density profile, which would be expected on physical grounds. By introducing a physically motivated dynamic mean field correction we incorporate the missing shear induced interparticle forces into the theory. We find that the shear flow tends to enhance the oscillations in the density profile of hard-spheres at a hard-wall and, at sufficiently high shear rates, induces a nonequilibrium transition to a steady state characterized by planes of particles parallel to the wall. Under gravity, we find that the center-of-mass of the density distribution increases with shear rate, i.e., shear increases the potential energy of the particles.
  • We present the first detector capable of recording high-bandwidth real time atom number density measurements of a Bose Einstein condensate. Based on a two-color Mach-Zehnder interferometer, our detector has a response time that is six orders of magnitude faster than current detectors based on CCD cameras while still operating at the shot-noise limit. With this minimally destructive system it may be possible to implement feedback to stabilize a Bose-Einstein condensate or an atom laser.
  • The two--dimensional topological BF model is quantized in the axial gauge. We show that this theory is trivially ultraviolet finite and that the usual infrared problem of the propagator of the scalar field in two dimensions is replaced by an easily solvable long distances problem inherent to the axial gauge. It will also be shown that contrarily to the 3--dimensional case, the action principle cannot be completely replaced by the various Ward identities expressing the symmetries of the model; some of the equation of motion are needed.