• Minor mergers are important processes contributing significantly to how galaxies evolve across the age of the Universe. Their impact on supermassive black hole growth and star formation is profound. The detailed study of dense molecular gas in galaxies provides an important test of the validity of the relation between star formation rate and HCN luminosity on different galactic scales. We use observations of HCN, HCO+1-0 and CO3-2 to study the dense gas properties in the Medusa merger. We calculate the brightness temperature ratios and use them in conjunction with a non-LTE radiative line transfer model. The HCN and HCO+1-0, and CO3-2 emission do not occupy the same structures as the less dense gas associated with the lower-J CO emission. The only emission from dense gas is detected in a 200pc region within the "Eye of the Medusa". No HCN or HCO+ is detected for the extended starburst. The CO3-2/2-1 brightness temperature ratio inside "the Eye" is ~2.5 - the highest ratio found so far. The line ratios reveal an extreme, fragmented molecular cloud population inside "the Eye" with large temperatures (>300K) and high gas densities (>10^4 cm^-3). "The Eye" is found at an interface between a large-scale minor axis inflow and the Medusa central region. The extreme conditions inside "the Eye" may be the result of the radiative and mechanical feedback from a deeply embedded, young, massive super star cluster, formed due to the gas pile-up at the intersection. Alternatively, shocks from the inflowing gas may be strong enough to shock and fragment the gas. For both scenarios, however, it appears that the HCN and HCO+ dense gas tracers are not probing star formation, but instead a post-starburst and/or shocked ISM that is too hot and fragmented to form new stars. Thus, caution is advised in linking the detection of emission from dense gas tracers to evidence of ongoing or imminent star formation.
  • (abridged) We present the IRAM-30m observations of multiple-J CO and CI line emission in a sample of redshift ~2-4 Herschel-ATLAS SMGs. A non-negligible effect of differential lensing is found for the CO emission lines, which could have caused significant underestimations of the linewidths, hence of the dynamical masses. The CO SLEDs are found to be similar to those of the local starburst-dominated ULIRGs and of the previously studied SMGs. After correcting for lensing amplification, we derived the global properties of the bulk of molecular gas in the SMGs using non-LTE radiative transfer modelling. The gas thermal pressure is found to be correlated with star formation efficiency. Further decomposing the CO SLEDs into two excitation components, we find a low-excitation component, which is less correlated with star formation, and a high-excitation one which is tightly related to the on-going star-forming activity. Additionally, tight linear correlations between the FIR and CO line luminosities have been confirmed for the $J \ge 5$ CO lines, implying that these CO lines are good tracers of star formation. The [CI](2-1) lines follow the tight linear correlation between the luminosities of the [CI](2-1) and the CO(1-0) line found in local starbursts, indicating that CI lines could serve as good total molecular gas mass tracers for high-redshift SMGs. The total mass of the molecular gas reservoir, $(1-30) \times 10^{10} M_\odot$, suggests a typical molecular gas depletion time ~20-100 Myr and a gas to dust mass ratio ${\delta}_{\rm GDR}$~30-100. The ratio between CO line luminosity and the dust mass appears to be slowly increasing with redshift for the SMGs, which need to be further confirmed. Finally, through comparing the linewidth of CO and H2O lines, we find that they agree well in almost all our SMGs, confirming that the emitting regions are co-spatially located.
  • We study the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity on the chemistry of molecular gas in NGC1068, a nearby (D=14Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing if the abundances of key molecular species like ethynyl (C2H), a classical tracer of PDR, change in the different environments of the disk of the galaxy. We have used ALMA to map the emission of the hyperfine multiplet of C2H(N=1-0) and its underlying continuum emission in the central r~35"(2.5kpc)-region of the disk of NGC1068 with a spatial resolution 1.0"x0.7"(50-70pc). We have developed a set of time-dependent chemical models to determine the origin of the C2H gas. A sizeable fraction of the total C2H line emission is detected from the r~1.3kpc starburst (SB) ring. However, the brightest C2H emission originates from a r~200pc off-centered circumnuclear disk (CND), where evidence of a molecular outflow has been previously found in other molecular tracers imaged by ALMA. We also detect significant emission that connects the CND with the outer disk. We derived the fractional abundances of C2H (X(C2H)) assuming LTE conditions. Our estimates range from X(C2H)~a few 10^-8 in the SB ring up to X(C2H)~ a few 10^-7 in the outflow region. PDR models that incorporate gas-grain chemistry are able to account for X(C2H) in the SB ring for moderately dense (n(H2)>10^4 cm^-3) and moderately UV-irradiated gas (UV-field<10xDraine field) in a steady-state regime. However, the high fractional abundances estimated for C2H in the outflow region can only be reached at very early times (T< 10^2-10^3 yr) in models of UV/X-ray irradiated dense gas (n(H2)>10^4-10^5) cm^-3). We interpret that the transient conditions required to fit the high values of X(C2H) in the outflow are likely due to UV/X-ray irradiated non-dissociative shocks associated with the highly turbulent interface between the outflow and the molecular gas in NGC1068.
  • We present 1.3- and/or 3-mm continuum images and 3-mm spectral scans, obtained using NOEMA and ALMA, of 21 distant, dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). Our sample is a subset of the galaxies selected by Ivison et al. (2016) on the basis of their extremely red far-infrared (far-IR) colours and low {\it Herschel} flux densities; most are thus expected to be unlensed, extraordinarily luminous starbursts at $z \gtrsim 4$, modulo the considerable cross-section to gravitational lensing implied by their redshift. We observed 17 of these galaxies with NOEMA and four with ALMA, scanning through the 3-mm atmospheric window. We have obtained secure redshifts for seven galaxies via detection of multiple CO lines, one of them a lensed system at $z=6.027$ (two others are also found to be lensed); a single emission line was detected in another four galaxies, one of which has been shown elsewhere to lie at $z=4.002$. Where we find no spectroscopic redshifts, the galaxies are generally less luminous by 0.3-0.4 dex, which goes some way to explaining our failure to detect line emission. We show that this sample contains amongst the most luminous known star-forming galaxies. Due to their extreme star-formation activity, these galaxies will consume their molecular gas in $\lesssim 100$ Myr, despite their high molecular gas masses, and are therefore plausible progenitors of the massive, `red-and-dead' elliptical galaxies at $z \approx 3$.
  • Extragalactic observations of water emission can provide valuable insights into the excitation of the interstellar medium. In addition, extragalactic megamasers are powerful probes of kinematics close to active nuclei. Therefore, it is paramount to determine the true origin of the water emission, whether it is excited by processes close to an AGN or in star-forming regions. We use ALMA Band 5 science verification observations to analyse the emission of the 183 GHz water line in Arp 220 on sub-arcsecond scales, in conjunction with new ALMA Band 7 data at 325 GHz. Specifically, the nature of the process leading to the excitation of emission at these water lines is studied in this context. Supplementary 22 GHz VLA observations are used to better constrain the parameter space in the excitation modelling of the water lines. We detect 183 GHz H2O and 325 GHz water emission towards the two compact nuclei at the center of Arp 220, being brighter in Arp 220 West. The emission at these two frequencies is compared to previous single-dish data and does not show evidence of variability. The 183 and 325 GHz lines show similar spectra and kinematics, but the 22 GHz profile is significantly different in both nuclei due to a blend with an NH3 absorption line. Our findings suggest that the most likely scenario to cause the observed water emission in Arp 220 is a large number of independent masers originating from numerous star-forming regions.
  • (abridged) We report rest-frame submillimeter H2O emission line observations of 11 HyLIRGs/ULIRGs at z~2-4 selected among the brightest lensed galaxies discovered in the Herschel-ATLAS. Using the IRAM NOEMA, we have detected 14 new H2O emission lines. The apparent luminosities of the H2O emission lines are $\mu L_{\rm{H_2O}} \sim 6-21 \times 10^8 L_\odot$, with velocity-integrated line fluxes ranging from 4-15 Jy km s$^{-1}$. We have also observed CO emission lines using EMIR on the IRAM 30m telescope in seven sources. The velocity widths for CO and H2O lines are found to be similar. With almost comparable integrated flux densities to those of the high-J CO line, H2O is found to be among the strongest molecular emitters in high-z Hy/ULIRGs. We also confirm our previously found correlation between luminosity of H2O ($L_{\rm{H_2O}}$) and infrared ($L_{\rm{IR}}$) that $L_{\rm{H_2O}} \sim L_{\rm{IR}}^{1.1-1.2}$, with our new detections. This correlation could be explained by a dominant role of far-infrared (FIR) pumping in the H2O excitation. Modelling reveals the FIR radiation fields have warm dust temperature $T_\rm{warm}$~45-75 K, H2O column density per unit velocity interval $N_{\rm{H_2O}}/\Delta V \gtrsim 0.3 \times 10^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$ km$^{-1}$ s and 100 $\mu$m continuum opacity $\tau_{100} > 1$ (optically thick), indicating that H2O is likely to trace highly obscured warm dense gas. However, further observations of $J\geq4$ H2O lines are needed to better constrain the continuum optical depth and other physical conditions of the molecular gas and dust. We have also detected H2O+ emission in three sources. A tight correlation between $L_{\rm{H_2O}}$ and $L_{\rm{H_2O^+}}$ has been found in galaxies from low to high redshift. The velocity-integrated flux density ratio between H2O+ and H2O suggests that cosmic rays generated by strong star formation are possibly driving the H2O+ formation.
  • SiO(3-2) and HNCO(6-5) emission has been imaged in NGC 1068 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). We perform an LTE and RADEX analysis to determine the column densities and physical characteristics of the gas emitting these two lines. We then use a chemical model to determine the origin of the emission. There is a strong SiO peak to the East of the AGN, with weak detections to the West. This distribution contrasts that of HNCO, which is detected more strongly to the West. The SiO emission peak in the East is similar to the peak of the molecular gas mass traced by CO. HNCO emission is offset from this peak by as much as 80 pc ( 1"). We compare velocity integrated line ratios in the East and West. We confirm that SiO emission strongly dominates in the East, while the reverse is true in the West. We use RADEX to analyse the possible gas conditions that could produce such emission. We find that, in both East and West, we cannot constrain a single temperature for the gas. We run a grid of chemical models of potential shock processes in the CND and find that SiO is significantly enhanced during a fast (60 km/s) shock but not during a slow (20 km/s) shock, nor in a gas not subjected to shocks at all. We find the inverse for HNCO, whose abundance increases during slow shocks and in warm non-shocked gas. High SiO and low HNCO indicated a fast shock, while high HNCO and low SiO indicates either a slow shock or warm, dense, non-shocked gas. The East Knot is therefore likely to contain gas that is heavily shocked. From chemical modelling, gas in the West Knot may be non-shocked, or maybe undergoing a much milder shock event. When taking into account RADEX results, the milder shock event is the more likely of the two scenarios.
  • We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to map the emission of the CO(6-5) molecular line and the 432 {\mu}m continuum emission from the 300 pc-sized circumnuclear disk (CND) of the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with a spatial resolution of ~4 pc. These observations spatially resolve the CND and, for the first time, image the dust emission, the molecular gas distribution, and the kinematics from a 7-10 pc-diameter disk that represents the submillimeter counterpart of the putative torus of NGC 1068. We fitted the nuclear spectral energy distribution of the torus using ALMA and near and mid-infrared (NIR/MIR) data with CLUMPY models. The mass and radius of the best-fit solution for the torus are both consistent with the values derived from the ALMA data alone: Mgas_torus=(1+-0.3)x10^5 Msun and Rtorus=3.5+-0.5 pc. The dynamics of the molecular gas in the torus show non-circular motions and enhanced turbulence superposed on the rotating pattern of the disk. The kinematic major axis of the CO torus is tilted relative to its morphological major axis. By contrast with the nearly edge-on orientation of the H2O megamaser disk, we have found evidence suggesting that the molecular torus is less inclined (i=34deg-66deg) at larger radii. The lopsided morphology and complex kinematics of the torus could be the signature of the Papaloizou-Pringle instability, long predicted to likely drive the dynamical evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGN) tori.
  • We report the detection of CO(1-0) emission from NGC 1277, a lenticular galaxy in the Perseus Cluster. NGC 1277 has previously been proposed to host an overmassive black hole (BH) compared to the galaxy bulge luminosity (mass), based on stellar-kinematic measurements. The CO(1-0) emission, observed with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) using both, a more compact (2.9-arcsec resolution) and a more extended (1-arcsec resolution) configuration, is likely to originate from the dust lane encompassing the galaxy nucleus at a distance of 0.9 arcsec (~320 pc). The double-horned CO(1-0) profile found at 2.9-arcsec resolution traces $1.5\times 10^8\ M_\odot$ of molecular gas, likely orbiting in the dust lane at $\sim 550\ \mathrm{km\ s^{-1}}$, which suggests a total enclosed mass of $\sim 2\times 10^{10}\ M_\odot$. At 1-arcsec resolution, the CO(1-0) emission appears spatially resolved along the dust lane in east-west direction, though at a low signal-to-noise ratio. In agreement with the previous stellar-kinematic measurements, the CO(1-0) kinematics is found to be consistent with an $\sim 1.7\times 10^{10}\ M_\odot$ BH for a stellar mass-to-light ratio of $M/L_V=6.3$, while a less massive BH of $\sim 5\times 10^{9}\ M_\odot$ is possible when assuming a larger $M/L_V=10$. While the molecular gas reservoir may be associated with a low level of star formation activity, the extended 2.6-mm continuum emission is likely to originate from a weak AGN, possibly characterized by an inverted radio-to-millimetre spectral energy distribution. Literature radio and X-ray data indicate that the BH in NGC 1277 is also overmassive with respect to the Fundamental Plane of BH activity.
  • We explore the potential of imaging vibrationally excited molecular emission at high angular resolution to better understand the morphology and physical structure of the dense gas in Arp~220 and to gain insight into the nature of the nuclear powering sources. Vibrationally excited emission of HCN is detected in both nuclei with a very high ratio relative to the total $L_{FIR}$, higher than in any other observed galaxy and well above what is observed in Galactic hot cores. HCN $v_2=1f$ is observed to be marginally resolved in $\sim60\times50$~pc regions inside the dusty $\sim100$~pc sized nuclear cores. Its emission is centered on our derived individual nuclear velocities based on HCO$^+$ emission ($V_{WN}=5342\pm4$ and $V_{EN}=5454\pm8$~\kms, for the western and eastern nucleus, respectively). With virial masses within $r\sim25-30$~pc based on the HCN~$v_2=1f$ line widths, we estimate gas surface densities (gas fraction $f_g=0.1$) of $3\pm0.3\times10^4~M_\odot~\rm pc^{-2}$ (WN) and $1.1\pm0.1\times10^4~M_\odot~\rm pc^{-2}$ (EN). The $4-3/3-2$ flux density ratio could be consistent with optically thick emission, which would further constrain the size of the emitting region to $>15$~pc (EN) and $>22$~pc (WN). The absorption systems that may hide up to $70\%$ of the HCN and HCO$^+$ emission are found at velocities of $-50$~\kms~(EN) and $6$, $-140$, and $-575$~\kms (WN) relative to velocities of the nuclei. Blueshifted absorptions are the evidence of outflowing motions from both nuclei. The bright vibrational emission implies the existence of a hot dust region radiatively pumping these transitions. We find evidence of a strong temperature gradient that would be responsible for both the HCN $v_2$ pumping and the absorbed profiles from the vibrational ground state as a result of both continuum and self-absorption by cooler foreground gas.
  • We present an analysis of 11 bright far-IR/submm sources discovered through a combination of the Planck survey and follow-up Herschel-SPIRE imaging. Each source has a redshift z=2.2-3.6 obtained through a blind redshift search with EMIR at the IRAM 30-m telescope. Interferometry obtained at IRAM and the SMA, and optical/near-infrared imaging obtained at the CFHT and the VLT reveal morphologies consistent with strongly gravitationally lensed sources. Additional photometry was obtained with JCMT/SCUBA-2 and IRAM/GISMO at 850 um and 2 mm, respectively. All objects are bright, isolated point sources in the 18 arcsec beam of SPIRE at 250 um, with spectral energy distributions peaking either near the 350 um or the 500 um bands of SPIRE, and with apparent far-infrared luminosities of up to 3x10^14 L_sun. Their morphologies and sizes, CO line widths and luminosities, dust temperatures, and far-infrared luminosities provide additional empirical evidence that these are strongly gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies. We discuss their dust masses and temperatures, and use additional WISE 22-um photometry and template fitting to rule out a significant contribution of AGN heating to the total infrared luminosity. Six sources are detected in FIRST at 1.4 GHz. Four have flux densities brighter than expected from the local far-infrared-radio correlation, but in the range previously found for high-z submm galaxies, one has a deficit of FIR emission, and 6 are consistent with the local correlation. The global dust-to-gas ratios and star-formation efficiencies of our sources are predominantly in the range expected from massive, metal-rich, intense, high-redshift starbursts. An extensive multi-wavelength follow-up programme is being carried out to further characterize these sources and the intense star-formation within them.
  • We present interferometric observations of the CN 1-0 (113.491 GHz), N2H+ 1-0 (93.173 GHz), H(41)a (92.034 GHz), CH3CN (91.987 GHz), CS 3-2 (146.969 GHz), c-C3H2 3-2 (145.089 GHz), H2CO 2-1 (145.603 GHz) and HC3N 16-15 (145.601 GHz) lines towards M82, carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). PDR chemical modelling is used to interpret these observations. Our results show that the abundances of N2H+, CS and H13 CO+ remain quite constant across the galaxy confirming that these species are excellent tracers of the dense molecular gas. On the contrary, the abundance of CN increases by a factor of 3 in the inner x2 bar orbits. The [CN]/[N2 H+ ] ratio is well correlated with the H(41)a emission at all spatial scales down to 100 pc. Chemical modelling shows that the variations in the [CN]/[N2H+] ratio can be explained as the consequence of differences in the local intestellar UV field and in the average cloud sizes within the nucleus of the galaxy. Our high-spatial resolution imaging of the starburst galaxy M 82 shows that the star formation activity has a strong impact on the chemistry of the molecular gas. In particular, the entire nucleus behaves as a giant photon-dominated region (PDR) whose chemistry is determined by the local UV flux. The detection of N2H+ shows the existence of a population of clouds with Av >20 mag all across the galaxy plane. These clouds constitute the molecular gas reservoir for the formation of new stars and, although distributed all along the nucleus, the highest concentration occurs in the outer x1 bar orbits (R = 280 pc).
  • We investigate the CO excitation of normal star forming disk galaxies at z=1.5 using IRAM PdBI observations of the CO[2-1], CO[3-2] and CO[5-4] transitions for 4 galaxies, including VLA observations of CO[1-0] for 3 of them, with the aim of constraining the average state of H2 gas. Exploiting prior knowledge of the velocity range, spatial extent and size of the CO emission we measure reliable line fluxes with S/N>4-7 for individual transitions. While the average CO Spectral Line Energy Distribution (SLED) has a sub-thermal excitation similar to the Milky Way (MW) up to CO[3-2], we show that the average CO[5-4] emission is four times stronger than assuming MW excitation. This demonstrates the presence of an additional component of more excited, denser and possibly warmer molecular gas. The ratio of CO[5-4] to lower-J CO emission is lower than in local (U)LIRGs and high-redshift SMGs, correlating closely with the average intensity of the radiation field <U> and with the star formation surface density, but not with the SF efficiency (SFE). The CO[5-4] luminosity correlates linearly with LIR over 4 orders of magnitudes, with z=1.5 BzK galaxies following the same trend as local spirals and (U)LIRGs and high redshift star bursting SMGs. The CO[5-4] luminosity is thus empirically related to the dense gas, and might be a more convenient way to probe it than standard high--density tracers that are much fainter than CO. We see excitation variations among our sample galaxies, that can be linked to their evolutionary state and clumpiness in optical rest frame images. In one galaxy we see spatially resolved excitation variations, where the more highly excited part of the galaxy corresponds to the location of massive SF clumps. This supports to models that suggest that giant clumps are the main source of the high excitation CO emission in high redshift disk-like galaxies.
  • The nearby Sy 1 galaxy NGC 1097 represents an ideal laboratory to explore the molecular chemistry in the presence and surroundings of an active galactic nucleus. Exploring the distribution of different molecular species allows us to understand the physical processes affecting the ISM both in the AGN vicinity as well as in the outer star forming molecular ring. We carried out 3 mm ALMA observations of HCN, HCO+, CCH, CS, HNCO, SiO, HC3N, and SO as well as the 13C isotopologues. All species were imaged over the central 2 kpc (~30") of the galaxy at a resolution of ~2.2"x1.5 (150 pc x 100 pc). HCO+ and CS appear to be slightly enhanced in the star forming ring. CCH, showing the largest variations across NGC 1097, is suggested to be a good tracer of both obscured and early stage star formation. HNCO, SiO and HC3N are significantly enhanced in the inner circumnuclear disk surrounding the AGN. Differences in the molecular abundances are observed between the star forming ring and the inner circumnuclear disk. We conclude that the HCN/HCO+ and HCN/CS differences observed between AGN dominated and starburst galaxies are not due to a HCN enhancement due to X-rays, but rather this enhancement is produced by shocked material at distances of 200 pc from the AGN. Additionally we claim the lower HCN/CS to be a combination of a small under-abundance of CS in AGNs together with excitation effects, where a high dense gas component (~10^6 cm^-3) may be more prominent in SB galaxies. However the most promising are the differences found among the dense gas tracers which, at our modest spatial resolution, seem to outline the physical structure of the molecular disk around the AGN. In this picture, HNCO probes the well shielded gas in the disk, surrounding the dense material moderately exposed to X-ray radiation traced by HC3N. Finally SiO might be the innermost molecule in the disk structure.
  • We present a detailed analysis of ALMA Bands 7 and 9 data of CO, HCO+, HCN and CS, augmented with Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) data of the ~ 200 pc circumnuclear disk (CND) and the ~ 1.3 kpc starburst ring (SB ring) of NGC~1068, a nearby (D = 14 Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy. We aim at determining the physical characteristics of the dense gas present in the CND and whether the different line intensity ratios we find within the CND as well as between the CND and the SB ring are due to excitation effects (gas density and temperature differences) or to a different chemistry. We estimate the column densities of each species in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). We then compute large one-dimensional non-LTE radiative transfer grids (using RADEX) by using first only the CO transitions, and then all the available molecules in order to constrain the densities, temperatures and column densities within the CND. We finally present a preliminary set of chemical models to determine the origin of the gas. We find that in general the gas in the CND is very dense (> 10^5 cm^-3) and hot (T> 150K), with differences especially in the temperature across the CND. The AGN position has the lowest CO/HCO+, CO/HCN and CO/CS column density ratios. RADEX analyses seem to indicate that there is chemical differentiation across the CND. We also find differences between the chemistry of the SB ring and some regions of the CND; the SB ring is also much colder and less dense than the CND. Chemical modelling does not succeed in reproducing all the molecular ratios with one model per region, suggesting the presence of multi-gas phase components. The LTE, RADEX and chemical analyses all indicate that more than one gas-phase component is necessary to uniquely fit all the available molecular ratios within the CND.
  • We investigate the fueling and the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity in NGC1068, a nearby (D=14Mpc) Seyfert 2 barred galaxy, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas in the disk. We have used ALMA to map the emission of a set of dense molecular gas tracers (CO(3-2), CO(6-5), HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3) and CS(7-6)) and their underlying continuum emission in the central r ~ 2kpc of NGC1068 with spatial resolutions ~ 0.3"-0.5" (~ 20-35pc). Molecular line and dust continuum emissions are detected from a r ~ 200pc off-centered circumnuclear disk (CND), from the 2.6kpc-diameter bar region, and from the r ~ 1.3kpc starburst (SB) ring. Most of the emission in HCO+, HCN and CS stems from the CND. Molecular line ratios show dramatic order-of-magnitude changes inside the CND that are correlated with the UV/X-ray illumination by the AGN, betraying ongoing feedback. The gas kinematics from r ~ 50pc out to r ~ 400pc reveal a massive (M_mol ~ 2.7 (+0.9, -1.2) x 10^7 Msun) outflow in all molecular tracers. The tight correlation between the ionized gas outflow, the radio jet and the occurrence of outward motions in the disk suggests that the outflow is AGN-driven. The outflow rate estimated in the CND, dM/dt ~ 63 (+21, -37) Msun yr^-1, is an order of magnitude higher than the star formation rate at these radii, confirming that the outflow is AGN-driven. The power of the AGN is able to account for the estimated momentum and kinetic luminosity of the outflow. The CND mass load rate of the CND outflow implies a very short gas depletion time scale of <=1 Myr.
  • We report ALMA observations of CO(3-2) emission in the Seyfert 2 double-barred galaxy NGC1433, at the unprecedented spatial resolution of 0.5"=24 pc. Our aim is to probe AGN feeding and feedback phenomena through the morphology and dynamics of the gas inside the central kpc. The CO map, which covers the whole nuclear region (nuclear bar and ring), reveals a nuclear gaseous spiral structure, inside the nuclear ring encircling the nuclear stellar bar. This gaseous spiral is well correlated with the dusty spiral seen in Hubble Space Telescope images. The nuclear spiral winds up in a pseudo-ring at 200 pc radius, which might correspond to the inner ILR. Continuum emission is detected at 0.87 mm only at the very centre, and its origin is more likely thermal dust emission than non-thermal emission from the AGN. It might correspond to the molecular torus expected to exist in this Seyfert 2 galaxy. The HCN(4-3) and HCO+(4-3) lines were observed simultaneously, but only upper limits are derived, with a ratio to the CO(3-2) line lower than 1/60 at 3sigma, indicating a relatively low abundance of very dense gas. The kinematics of the gas over the nuclear disk reveal rather regular rotation only slightly perturbed by streaming motions due to the spiral; the primary and secondary bars are too closely aligned with the galaxy major or minor axis to leave a signature in the projected velocities. Near the nucleus, there is an intense high-velocity CO emission feature redshifted to 200 km/s (if located in the plane), with a blue-shifted counterpart, at 2" (100 pc) from the centre. While the CO spectra are quite narrow in the centre, this wide component is interpreted as an outflow involving a molecular mass of 3.6 10^6 Mo and a flow rate 7 Mo/yr. The flow could be in part driven by the central star formation, but is mainly boosted by the AGN through its wind or radio jets.
  • We report ALMA observations of CO(3-2) emission in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 1566, at a spatial resolution of 25 pc. Our aim is to investigate the morphology and dynamics of the gas inside the central kpc, and to probe nuclear fueling and feedback phenomena. NGC 1566 has a nuclear bar of 1.7 kpc radius and a conspicuous grand design spiral starting from this radius. The ALMA field of view, of diameter 0.9 kpc, lies well inside the nuclear bar and reveals a molecular trailing spiral structure from 50 to 300~pc in size, which is contributing to fuel the nucleus, according to its negative gravity torques. The spiral starts with a large pitch angle from the center and then winds up in a pseudo-ring at the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) of the nuclear bar. This is the first time that a trailing spiral structure is clearly seen driving the gas inwards inside the ILR ring of the nuclear bar. This phenomenon shows that the massive central black hole has a significant dynamical influence on the gas, triggering its fueling. The gaseous spiral is well correlated with the dusty spiral seen through extinction in HST images, and also with a spiral feature emitting 0.87mm continuum. This continuum emission must come essentially from cold dust heated by the interstellar radiation field. The HCN(4-3) and HCO+(4-3) lines were simultaneously mapped and detected in the nuclear spiral. The HCO+(4-3) line is 3 times stronger than the HCN(4-3), as expected when star formation excitation dominates over active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. The CO(3-2)/HCO+(4-3) integrated intensity ratio is \sim 100. The molecular gas is in remarkably regular rotation, with only slight non-circular motions at the periphery of the nuclear spiral arms. These perturbations are quite small, and no outflow nor AGN feedback is detected.
  • Understanding the relationship between the formation and evolution of galaxies and their central super massive black holes (SMBH) is one of the main topics in extragalactic astrophysics. Links and feedback may reciprocally affect both black hole and galaxy growth. Observations of the CO line at redshifts of 2-4 are crucial to investigate the gas mass, star formation activity and accretion onto SMBHs, as well as the effect of AGN feedback. Potential correlations between AGN and host galaxy properties can be highlighted by observing extreme objects. Despite their luminosity, hyper-luminous QSOs at z=2-4 are still little studied at mm wavelengths. We targeted CO(3-2) in ULAS J1539+0557, an hyper-luminos QSO (Lbol> 10^48 erg/s) at z=2.658, selected through its unusual red colors in the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (ULAS). We find a molecular gas mass of 4.1+-0.8 10^10 Msun, and a gas fraction of 0.4-0.1, depending mostly on the assumed source inclination. We also find a robust lower limit to the star-formation rate (SFR=250-1600 Msun/yr) and star-formation efficiency (SFE=25-350 Lsun/(K km s-1 pc2) by comparing the observed optical-near-infrared spectral energy distribution with AGN and galaxy templates. The black hole gas consumption timescale, M(H_2)/dM(accretion)/dt, is ~160 Myr, similar or higher than the gas consumption timescale. The gas content and the star formation efficiency are similar to those of other high-luminosity, highly obscured QSOs, and at the lower end of the star-formation efficiency of unobscured QSOs, in line with predictions from AGN-galaxy co-evolutionary scenarios. Further measurements of the (sub)-mm continuum in this and similar sources are mandatory to obtain a robust observational picture of the AGN evolutionary sequence.
  • Strong gravitational lenses are now being routinely discovered in wide-field surveys at (sub)millimeter wavelengths. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) high-spatial resolution imaging and Gemini-South and Multiple Mirror Telescope optical spectroscopy of strong lens candidates discovered in the two widest extragalactic surveys conducted by the Herschel Space Observatory: the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). From a sample of 30 Herschel sources with S_500>100 mJy, 21 are strongly lensed (multiply imaged), 4 are moderately lensed (singly imaged), and the remainder require additional data to determine their lensing status. We apply a visibility-plane lens modeling technique to the SMA data to recover information about the masses of the lenses as well as the intrinsic (i.e., unlensed) sizes (r_half) and far-infrared luminosities (L_FIR) of the lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). The sample of lenses comprises primarily isolated massive galaxies, but includes some groups and clusters as well. Several of the lenses are located at z_lens>0.7, a redshift regime that is inaccessible to lens searches based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy. The lensed SMGs are amplified by factors that are significantly below statistical model predictions given the 500um flux densities of our sample. We speculate that this may reflect a deficiency in our understanding of the intrinsic sizes and luminosities of the brightest SMGs. The lensed SMGs span nearly one decade in L_FIR (median L_FIR=7.9x10^12 L_sun) and two decades in FIR luminosity surface density (median Sigma_FIR=6.0x10^11 L_sun kpc^-2). The strong lenses in this sample and others identified via (sub-)mm surveys will provide a wealth of information regarding the astrophysics of galaxy formation and evolution over a wide range in redshift.
  • Upon its completion the Herschel ATLAS (H-ATLAS) will be the largest submillimetre survey to date, detecting close to half-a-million sources. It will only be possible to measure spectroscopic redshifts for a small fraction of these sources. However, if the rest-frame spectral energy distribution (SED) of a typical H-ATLAS source is known, this SED and the observed Herschel fluxes can be used to estimate the redshifts of the H-ATLAS sources without spectroscopic redshifts. In this paper, we use a subset of 40 H-ATLAS sources with previously measured redshifts in the range 0.5<z<4.2 to derive a suitable average template for high redshift H-ATLAS sources. We find that a template with two dust components T_c = 23.9 K, T_h = 46.9 K and ratio of mass of cold dust to mass of warm dust of 30.1) provides a good fit to the rest-frame fluxes of the sources in our calibration sample. We use a jackknife technique to estimate the accuracy of the redshifts estimated with this template, finding a root mean square of Delta z/(1+z) = 0.26. For sources for which there is prior information that they lie at z > 1 we estimate that the rms of Delta z/(1+z) = 0.12. We have used this template to estimate the redshift distribution for the sources detected in the H-ATLAS equatorial fields, finding a bimodal distribution with a mean redshift of 1.2, 1.9 and 2.5 for 250, 350 and 500 um selected sources respectively. \end{abstract}
  • We report the redshift of HATLAS J132427.0+284452 (hereafter HATLAS J132427), a gravitationally lensed starburst galaxy, the first determined 'blind' by the Herschel Space Observatory. This is achieved via the detection of [C II] consistent with z = 1.68 in a far-infrared spectrum taken with the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer. We demonstrate that the [C II] redshift is secure via detections of CO J = 2 - 1 and 3 - 2 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy and the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique's Plateau de Bure Interferometer. The intrinsic properties appear typical of high-redshift starbursts despite the high lensing-amplified fluxes, proving the ability of the FTS to probe this population with the aid of lensing. The blind detection of [C II] demonstrates the potential of the SAFARI imaging spectrometer, proposed for the much more sensitive SPICA mission, to determine redshifts of multiple dusty galaxies simultaneously without the benefit of lensing.
  • Panchromatic observations of the best candidate HyLIRG from the widest Herschel extragalactic imaging survey have led to the discovery of at least four intrinsically luminous z=2.41 galaxies across a ~100-kpc region - a cluster of starbursting proto-ellipticals. Via sub-arcsecond interferometric imaging we have measured accurate gas and star-formation surface densities. The two brightest galaxies span ~3 kpc FWHM in submm/radio continuum and CO J=4-3, and double that in CO J=1-0. The broad CO line is due partly to the multitude of constituent galaxies and partly to large rotational velocities in two counter-rotating gas disks -- a scenario predicted to lead to the most intense starbursts, which will therefore come in pairs. The disks have M(dyn) of several x 10^11 Msun, and gas fractions of ~40%. Velocity dispersions are modest so the disks are unstable, potentially on scales commensurate with their radii: these galaxies are undergoing extreme bursts of star formation, not confined to their nuclei, at close to the Eddington limit. Their specific star-formation rates place them ~>5x above the main sequence, which supposedly comprises large gas disks like these. Their high star-formation efficiencies are difficult to reconcile with a simple volumetric star-formation law. N-body and dark matter simulations suggest this system is the progenitor of a B(inary)-type ~10^14.6-Msun cluster.
  • Massive present-day early-type (elliptical and lenticular) galaxies probably gained the bulk of their stellar mass and heavy elements through intense, dust-enshrouded starbursts - that is, increased rates of star formation - in the most massive dark matter halos at early epochs. However, it remains unknown how soon after the Big Bang such massive starburst progenitors exist. The measured redshift distribution of dusty, massive starbursts has long been suspected to be biased low in redshift owing to selection effects, as confirmed by recent findings of systems out to redshift z~5. Here we report the identification of a massive starburst galaxy at redshift 6.34 through a submillimeter color-selection technique. We unambiguously determined the redshift from a suite of molecular and atomic fine structure cooling lines. These measurements reveal a hundred billion solar masses of highly excited, chemically evolved interstellar medium in this galaxy, which constitutes at least 40% of the baryonic mass. A "maximum starburst" converts the gas into stars at a rate more than 2,000 times that of the Milky Way, a rate among the highest observed at any epoch. Despite the overall downturn of cosmic star formation towards the highest redshifts, it seems that environments mature enough to form the most massive, intense starbursts existed at least as early as 880 million years after the Big Bang.
  • We present the results of a series of radio, optical, X-ray and gamma-ray observations of the BL Lac object S50716+714 carried out between April 2007 and January 2011. The multi-frequency observations were obtained using several ground and space based facilities. The intense optical monitoring of the source reveals faster repetitive variations superimposed on a long-term variability trend at a time scale of ~350 days. Episodes of fast variability recur on time scales of ~ 60-70 days. The intense and simultaneous activity at optical and gamma-ray frequencies favors the SSC mechanism for the production of the high-energy emission. Two major low-peaking radio flares were observed during this high optical/gamma-ray activity period. The radio flares are characterized by a rising and a decaying stage and are in agreement with the formation of a shock and its evolution. We found that the evolution of the radio flares requires a geometrical variation in addition to intrinsic variations of the source. Different estimates yield a robust and self-consistent lower limits of \delta > 20 and equipartition magnetic field B_eq > 0.36 G. Causality arguments constrain the size of emission region \theta < 0.004 mas. We found a significant correlation between flux variations at radio frequencies with those at optical and gamma-rays. The optical/GeV flux variations lead the radio variability by ~65 days. The longer time delays between low-peaking radio outbursts and optical flares imply that optical flares are the precursors of radio ones. An orphan X-ray flare challenges the simple, one-zone emission models, rendering them too simple. Here we also describe the spectral energy distribution modeling of the source from simultaneous data taken through different activity periods.