• We present the detection of a blackbody component in GRB 160107A emission by using the combined spectral data of the CALET Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM) and the MAXI Gas Slit Camera (GSC). The MAXI/GSC detected the emission $\sim$45 s prior to the main burst episode observed by the CGBM. The MAXI/GSC and the CGBM spectrum of this prior emission period is well fit by a blackbody with the temperature of $1.0^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$ keV plus a power-law with the photon index of $-1.6 \pm 0.3$. We discuss the radius to the photospheric emission and the main burst emission based on the observational properties. We stress the importance of the coordinated observations via various instruments collecting the high quality data over a broad energy coverage in order to understand the GRB prompt emission mechanism.
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of the low-mass X-ray binary Sco X-1 using Kepler K2 optical data and Fermi GBM and MAXI X-ray data. We recover a clear sinusoidal orbital modulation from the Kepler data. Optical fluxes are distributed bimodally around the mean orbital light curve, with both high and low states showing the same modulation. The high state is broadly consistent with the flaring branch of the Z diagram and the low state with the normal branch. We see both rapid optical flares and slower dips in the high state, and slow brightenings in the low state. High state flares exhibit a narrow range of amplitudes with a striking cut-off at a maximum amplitude. Optical fluxes correlate with X-ray fluxes in the high state, but in the low state they are anti-correlated. These patterns can be seen clearly in both flux-flux diagrams and cross-correlation functions and are consistent between MAXI and GBM. The high state correlation arises promptly with at most a few minutes lag. We attribute this to thermal reprocessing of X-ray flares. The low state anti-correlation is broader, consistent with optical lags of between zero and 3 ~min, and strongest with respect to high energy X-rays. We suggest that the decreases in optical flux in the low state may reflect decreasing efficiency of disc irradiation, caused by changes in the illumination geometry. These changes could reflect the vertical extent or covering factor of obscuration or the optical depth of scattering material.
  • The Earth Occultation Technique (EOT) has been applied to Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to perform all-sky monitoring for a predetermined catalog of hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray sources. In order to search for sources not in the catalog, thus completing the catalog and reducing a source of systematic error in EOT, an imaging method has been developed -- Imaging with a Differential filter using the Earth Occultation Method (IDEOM). IDEOM is a tomographic imaging method that takes advantage of the orbital precession of the Fermi satellite. Using IDEOM, all-sky reconstructions have been generated for ~sim 4 years of GBM data in the 12-50 keV, 50-100 keV and 100-300 keV energy bands in search of sources otherwise unmodeled by the GBM occultation analysis. IDEOM analysis resulted in the detection of 57 sources in the 12-50 keV energy band, 23 sources in the 50-100 keV energy band, and 7 sources in the 100-300 keV energy band. Seventeen sources were not present in the original GBM-EOT catalog and have now been added. We also present the first joined averaged spectra for four persistent sources detected by GBM using EOT and by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi: NGC 1275, 3C 273, Cen A, and the Crab.
  • We present recent contemporaneous X-ray and optical observations of the Be/X-ray binary system A\,0535+26 with the \textit{Fermi}/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and several ground-based observatories. These new observations are put into the context of the rich historical data (since $\sim$1978) and discussed in terms of the neutron star Be-disk interaction. The Be circumstellar disk was exceptionally large just before the 2009 December giant outburst, which may explain the origin of the unusual recent X-ray activity of this source. We found a peculiar evolution of the pulse profile during this giant outburst, with the two main components evolving in opposite ways with energy. A hard 30-70 mHz X-ray QPO was detected with GBM during this 2009 December giant outburst. It becomes stronger with increasing energy and disappears at energies below 25\,keV. In the long-term a strong optical/X-ray correlation was found for this system, however in the medium-term the H$_\alpha$ EW and the V-band brightness showed an anti-correlation after $\sim$2002 Agust. Each giant X-ray outburst occurred during a decline phase of the optical brightness, while the H$_\alpha$ showed a strong emission. In late 2010 and before the 2011 February outburst, rapid V/R variations are observed in the strength of the two peaks of the H$_\alpha$ line. These had a period of $\sim$\,25 days and we suggest the presence of a global one-armed oscillation to explain this scenario. A general pattern might be inferred, where the disk becomes weaker and shows V/R variability beginning $\sim$\,6 months following a giant outburst.
  • Cygnus X-1 is a high-mass x-ray binary with a black hole compact object. It is normally extremely bright in hard x-rays and low energy gamma rays and resides in the canonical hard spectral state. Recently, however, Cyg X-1 made a transition to the canonical soft state, with a rise in the soft x-ray flux and a decrease in the flux in the hard x-ray and low energy gamma-ray energy bands. We have been using the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor on Fermi to monitor the fluxes of a number of sources in the 8--1000 keV energy range, including Cyg X-1. We present light curves of Cyg X-1 showing the flux decrease in hard x-ray and low energy gamma-ray energy bands during the state transition as well as the several long flares observed in these higher energies during the soft state. We also present preliminary spectra from GBM for the pre-transition state, showing the spectral evolution to the soft state, and the post-transition state.
  • A Rotating Modulator (RM) is one of a class of techniques for indirect imaging of an object scene by modulation and detection of incident photons. Comparison of the RM to more common imaging techniques, the Rotating Modulation Collimator and the coded aperture, reveals trade-offs in instrument weight and complexity, sensitivity, angular resolution, and image fidelity. In the case of a high-energy (hundreds of keV to MeV), wide field-of-view, satellite or balloon-borne astrophysical survey mission, the RM is shown to be an attractive option when coupled with a reconstruction algorithm that can simultaneously achieve super-resolution and suppress fluctuations arising from statistical noise. We describe the Noise-Compensating Algebraic Reconstruction (NCAR) algorithm, which is shown to perform better than traditional deconvolution techniques for most object scene distributions. Results from Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that NCAR achieves super-resolution, can resolve multiple point sources and complex distributions, and manifests noise as fuzzy sidelobes about the true source location, rather than spurious peaks elsewhere in the image as seen with other techniques.
  • We describe an improved method of mapping the gamma-ray sky by applying the Linear Radon Transform to data from BATSE on NASA's CGRO. Based on a method similar to that used in medical imaging, we use the relatively sharp (~0.25 deg) limb of the Earth to collimate BATSE's eight Large Area Detectors (LADs). Coupling this to the ~51-day precession cycle of the CGRO orbit, we can complete a full survey of the sky, localizing point sources to < 1 deg accuracy. This technique also uses a physical model for removing many sources of gamma-ray background, which allows us to image strong gamma-ray sources such as the Crab up to ~2 MeV with only a single precession cycle. We present the concept of the Radon Transform technique as applied to the BATSE data for imaging the gamma-ray sky and show sample images in three broad energy bands (23-98 keV, 98-230 keV, and 230-595 keV) centered on the positions of selected sources from the catalog of 130 known sources used in our Enhanced BATSE Occultation Package (EBOP) analysis system. Any new sources discovered during the sky survey will be added to the input catalog for EBOP allowing daily light curves and spectra to be generated. We also discuss the adaptation of tomographic imaging to the Fermi GBM occultation project.
  • The BATSE earth-occultation database provides nine years of coverage for 75 $\gamma$-ray sources in the energy range 35-1700 keV. For transient sources, this long time-base dataset makes it possible to study the repeated outbursts from individual objects. We have used the JPL data analysis package EBOP (Enhanced BATSE Occultation Package) to derive the light curves and the time evolution of the spectra for the black hole candidate and microquasar sources GRO J1655-40 and GRS 1915+105. We find that GRO J1655-40, during high-intensity flaring periods, is characterized by a single power-law spectrum up to 500 keV with a spectral index consistent with that observed by OSSE. During one flare observed contemporaneously with OSSE and HEXTE, the GRO J1655-40 spectrum was observed to steepen as the $\gamma$-ray intensity increased. For GRS 1915+105, the spectrum during high intensity flaring periods can be characterized by a broken power law with a time-varying high-energy component. The spectra of these microquasars differ from the black hole candidates Cygnus X-1, GRO J0422+32, and GRO J1719-24, which have thermal contributions to their spectra when in high $\gamma$-ray states. This suggests that there may be two different classes of Galactic black hole candidates.
  • The observation of a small change in spectral slope, or 'knee' in the fluxes of cosmic rays near energies 10^15 eV has caused much speculation since its discovery over 40 years ago. The origin of this feature remains unknown. A small workshop to review some modern experimental measurements of this region was held at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, USA in June 2000. This paper summarizes the results presented at this workshop and the discussion of their interpretation in the context of hadronic models of atmospheric airshowers.