• Symmetries play an important role in modern theories of gravity. The strong equivalence principle (SEP) constitutes a collection of gravitational symmetries which are all implemented by general relativity. Alternative theories, however, are generally expected to violate some aspects of SEP. We test three aspects of SEP using observed change rates in the orbital period and eccentricity of binary pulsar J1713+0747: 1. the gravitational constant's constancy as part of locational invariance of gravitation; 2. the post-Newtonian parameter $\hat{\alpha}_3$ in gravitational Lorentz invariance; 3. the universality of free fall (UFF) for strongly self-gravitating bodies. Based on the pulsar timing result of the combined dataset from the North American Nanohertz Gravitational Observatory (NANOGrav) and the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA), we find $\dot{G}/G = (-0.1 \pm 0.9) \times 10^{-12}\,{\rm yr}^{-1}$, which is weaker than Solar system limits, but applies for strongly self-gravitating objects. Furthermore, we obtain the constraints $|\Delta|< 0.002$ for the UFF test and $-3\times10^{-20} < \hat{\alpha}_3 < 4\times10^{-20}$ at 95% confidence. These are the first direct UFF and $\hat{\alpha}_3$ tests based on pulsar binaries, and they overcome various limitations of previous tests.
  • We search for an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) in the newly released $11$-year dataset from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav). While we find no significant evidence for a GWB, we place constraints on a GWB from a population of supermassive black-hole binaries, from cosmic strings, and from a primordial GWB. For the first time, we find that the GWB upper limits and detection statistics are sensitive to the Solar System ephemeris (SSE) model used, and that SSE errors can mimic a GWB signal. To mitigate this effect, we developed and implemented a novel approach that bridges systematic SSE differences, producing the first PTA constraints that are robust against SSE uncertainties. We place a $95\%$ upper limit on the GW strain amplitude of $A_\mathrm{GWB}<1.45\times 10^{-15}$ at a frequency of $f=1$ yr$^{-1}$ for a fiducial $f^{-2/3}$ power-law spectrum, and with inter-pulsar correlations modeled. This is a factor of $\sim 2$ improvement over the NANOGrav $9$-year limit, calculated using the same procedure. Previous PTA upper limits on the GWB will need revision in light of SSE systematic uncertainties. We also characterize the combined influence of the mass-density of stars in galactic cores, the eccentricity of binaries at formation, and the relation between the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the galactic bulge (the $M_\mathrm{BH}-M_\mathrm{bulge}$ relation). We constrain cosmic-string tension on the basis of recent simulations, yielding an SSE-marginalized 95\% upper limit on the cosmic string tension of $G\mu < 5.3\times 10^{-11}$---a factor of $\sim 2$ better than the NANOGrav $9$-year constraints. We then use our new Bayesian SSE model to limit the energy density of primordial GWBs, corresponding to $\Omega_\mathrm{GWB}(f)h^2<3.4 \times 10^{-10}$ for a radiation-dominated inflationary era. [ABRIDGED]
  • Gravitational wave (GW) detection with pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) requires accurate noise characterization. The noise of our Galactic-scale GW detector has been systematically evaluated by the Noise Budget and Interstellar Medium Mitigation working groups within the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration. Intrinsically, individual radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) used by NANOGrav can have some degree of achromatic red spin noise, as well as white noise due to pulse phase jitter. Along any given line-of-sight, the ionized interstellar medium contributes chromatic noise through dispersion measure (DM) variations, interstellar scintillation, and scattering. These effects contain both red and white components. In the future, with wideband receivers, the effects of frequency-dependent DM will become important. Having anticipated and measured these diverse sources of detector noise, the NANOGrav PTA remains well-poised to detect low-frequency GWs.
  • We present the results of an optical spectroscopic survey of 46 heavily obscured quasar candidates. Objects are selected using their mid-infrared (mid-IR) colours and magnitudes from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and their optical magnitudes from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Candidate Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) are selected to have mid-IR colours indicative of quasar activity and lie in a region of mid-IR colour space outside previously published X-ray based selection regions. We obtain optical spectra for our sample using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph on the Southern African Large Telescope. Thirty objects (65%) have identifiable emission lines, allowing for the determination of spectroscopic redshifts. Other than one object at $z\sim2.6$, candidates have moderate redshifts ranging from $z=0.1$ to $0.8$ with a median of 0.3. Twenty-one (70%) of our objects with identified redshift (46% of the whole sample) are identified as AGNs through common optical diagnostics. We model the spectral energy distributions of our sample and found that all require a strong AGN component, with an average intrinsic AGN fraction at 8$\,\mu$m of 0.91. Additionally, the fits require large extinction coefficients with an average $E(B-V)_\textrm{AGN} = 17.8$ (average $A(V)_\textrm{AGN} = 53.4$). By focusing on the area outside traditional mid-IR photometric cuts, we are able to capture and characterise a population of deeply buried quasars that were previously unattainable through X-ray surveys alone.
  • We analyze dispersion measure (DM) variations of 37 millisecond pulsars in the 9-year NANOGrav data release and constrain the sources of these variations. Variations are significant for nearly all pulsars, with characteristic timescales comparable to or even shorter than the average spacing between observations. Five pulsars have periodic annual variations, 14 pulsars have monotonically increasing or decreasing trends, and 13 pulsars show both effects. Several pulsars show correlations between DM excesses and lines of sight that pass close to the Sun. Mapping of the DM variations as a function of the pulsar trajectory can identify localized ISM features and, in one case, an upper limit to the size of the dispersing region of 13.2 AU. Finally, five pulsars show very nearly quadratic structure functions, which could be indicative of an underlying Kolmogorov medium. Four pulsars show roughly Kolmogorov structure functions and another four show structure functions less steep than Kolmogorov. One pulsar has too large an uncertainty to allow comparisons. We discuss explanations for apparent departures from a Kolmogorov-like spectrum, and show that the presence of other trends in the data is the most likely cause.
  • Gravitational wave astronomy using a pulsar timing array requires high-quality millisecond pulsars, correctable interstellar propagation delays, and high-precision measurements of pulse times of arrival. Here we identify noise in timing residuals that exceeds that predicted for arrival time estimation for millisecond pulsars observed by the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves. We characterize the excess noise using variance and structure function analyses. We find that 26 out of 37 pulsars show inconsistencies with a white-noise-only model based on the short timescale analysis of each pulsar and we demonstrate that the excess noise has a red power spectrum for 15 pulsars. We also decompose the excess noise into chromatic (radio-frequency-dependent) and achromatic components. Associating the achromatic red-noise component with spin noise and including additional power-spectrum-based estimates from the literature, we estimate a scaling law in terms of spin parameters (frequency and frequency derivative) and data-span length and compare it to the scaling law of Shannon \& Cordes (2010). We briefly discuss our results in terms of detection of gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies.
  • The use of pulsars as astrophysical clocks for gravitational wave experiments demands the highest possible timing precision. Pulse times of arrival (TOAs) are limited by stochastic processes that occur in the pulsar itself, along the line of sight through the interstellar medium, and in the measurement process. On timescales of seconds to hours, the TOA variance exceeds that from template-fitting errors due to additive noise. We assess contributions to the total variance from two additional effects: amplitude and phase jitter intrinsic to single pulses and changes in the interstellar impulse response from scattering. The three effects have different dependencies on time, frequency, and pulse signal-to-noise ratio. We use data on 37 pulsars from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves to assess the individual contributions to the overall intraday noise budget for each pulsar. We detect jitter in 22 pulsars and estimate the average value of RMS jitter in our pulsars to be $\sim 1\%$ of pulse phase. We examine how jitter evolves as a function of frequency and find evidence for evolution. Finally, we compare our measurements with previous noise parameter estimates and discuss methods to improve gravitational wave detection pipelines.
  • PSR J1024$-$0719 is a millisecond pulsar that was long thought to be isolated. However, puzzling results concerning its velocity, distance, and low rotational period derivative have led to reexamination of its properties. We present updated radio timing observations along with new and archival optical data that show PSR J1024$-$0719 is most likely in a long period (2$-$20 kyr) binary system with a low-mass ($\approx 0.4\,M_\odot$) low-metallicity ($Z \approx -0.9\,$ dex) main sequence star. Such a system can explain most of the anomalous properties of this pulsar. We suggest that this system formed through a dynamical exchange in a globular cluster that ejected it into a halo orbit, consistent with the low observed metallicity for the stellar companion. Further astrometric and radio timing observations such as measurement of the third period derivative could strongly constrain the range of orbital parameters.
  • An important question in extragalactic astronomy concerns the distribution of black hole accretion rates of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Based on observations at X-ray wavelengths, the observed Eddington ratio distribution appears as a power law, while optical studies have often yielded a lognormal distribution. There is increasing evidence that these observed discrepancies may be due to contamination by star formation and other selection effects. Using a sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we test if an intrinsic Eddington ratio distribution that takes the form of a Schechter function is consistent with previous work that suggests that young galaxies in optical surveys have an observed lognormal Eddington ratio distribution. We simulate the optical emission line properties of a population of galaxies and AGN using a broad instantaneous luminosity distribution described by a Schechter function near the Eddington limit. This simulated AGN population is then compared to observed galaxies via the positions on an emission line excitation diagram and Eddington ratio distributions. We present an improved method for extracting the AGN distribution using BPT diagnostics that allows us to probe over one order of magnitude lower in Eddington ratio counteracting the effects of dilution by star formation. We conclude that for optically selected AGN in young galaxies, the intrinsic Eddington ratio distribution is consistent with a possibly universal, broad power law with an exponential cutoff, as this distribution is observed in old optically selected galaxies and in X-rays.
  • We report 21-yr timing of one of the most precise pulsars: PSR J1713+0747. Its pulse times of arrival are well modeled by a comprehensive pulsar binary model including its three-dimensional orbit and a noise model that incorporates correlated noise such as jitter and red noise. Its timing residuals have weighted root mean square $\sim 92$ ns. The new dataset allows us to update and improve previous measurements of the system properties, including the masses of the neutron star ($1.31\pm0.11$ $M_{\odot}$) and the companion white dwarf ($0.286\pm0.012$ $M_{\odot}$) and the parallax distance $1.15\pm0.03$ kpc. We measured the intrinsic change in orbital period, $\dot{P}^{\rm Int}_{\rm b}$, is $-0.20\pm0.17$ ps s$^{-1}$, which is not distinguishable from zero. This result, combined with the measured $\dot{P}^{\rm Int}_{\rm b}$ of other pulsars, can place a generic limit on potential changes in the gravitational constant $G$. We found that $\dot{G}/G$ is consistent with zero [$(-0.6\pm1.1)\times10^{-12}$ yr$^{-1}$, 95\% confidence] and changes at least a factor of $31$ (99.7\% confidence) more slowly than the average expansion rate of the Universe. This is the best $\dot{G}/G$ limit from pulsar binary systems. The $\dot{P}^{\rm Int}_{\rm b}$ of pulsar binaries can also place limits on the putative coupling constant for dipole gravitational radiation $\kappa_D=(-0.9\pm3.3)\times10^{-4}$ (95\% confidence). Finally, the nearly circular orbit of this pulsar binary allows us to constrain statistically the strong-field post-Newtonian parameters $\Delta$, which describes the violation of strong equivalence principle, and $\hat{\alpha}_3$, which describes a breaking of both Lorentz invariance in gravitation and conservation of momentum. We found, at 95\% confidence, $\Delta<0.01$ and $\hat{\alpha}_3<2\times10^{-20}$ based on PSR J1713+0747.
  • State selective field ionization detection techniques in physics require a specific progression through a complicated atomic state space to optimize state selectivity and overall efficiency. For large principle quantum number n, the theoretical models become computationally intractable and any results are often rendered irrelevant by small deviations from ideal experimental conditions, for example external electromagnetic fields. Several different proposals for quantum information processing rely heavily upon the quality of these detectors. In this paper, we show a proof of principle that it is possible to optimize experimental field profiles in situ by running a genetic algorithm to control aspects of the experiment itself. A simple experiment produced novel results that are consistent with analyses of existing results.
  • Rydberg States are used in our One Atom Maser experiment because they offer a large dipole moment and couple strongly to low numbers of microwave photons in a high Q cavity. Here we report the absolute frequencies of the P$_{3/2}$ states for principal quantum numbers $n=36$ to $n=63$. These measurements were made with a three step laser excitation scheme. A wavemeter was calibrated against a frequency comb to provide accurate absolute frequency measurements over the entire range, reducing the measurement uncertainty to 1MHz. We compare the spectroscopic results with known frequency measurements as a test of measurement accuracy.
  • High efficiency single photon detection is an interesting problem for many areas of physics, including low temperature measurement, quantum information science and particle physics. For optical photons, there are many examples of devices capable of detecting single photons with high efficiency. However reliable single photon detection of microwaves is very difficult, principally due to their low energy. In this paper we present the theory of a cascade amplifier operating in the microwave regime that has an optimal quantum efficiency of 93%. The device uses a microwave photon to trigger the stimulated emission of a sequence of atoms where the energy transition is readily detectable. A detailed description of the detector's operation and some discussion of the potential limitations of the detector are presented.
  • We report on a scheme for highly efficient detection of single microwave photons, with application to detecting certain exotic particles such as the axion. This scheme utilises an experiment known as the micromaser and the phenomenon of trapping states to amplify the signal and produce a cascade of detector counts in a field ionization detector. The cascade provides a time-resolved signal marking the presence of a single photon. For experimentally achievable parameters, the detection efficiency exceeds 90 percent.