• Cygnus X-3 is a unique microquasar in the Galaxy hosting a Wolf-Rayet companion orbiting a compact object that most likely is a low-mass black hole. The unique source properties are likely due to the interaction of the compact object with the heavy stellar wind of the companion. In this paper, we concentrate on a very specific period of time prior to the massive outbursts observed from the source. During this period, Cygnus X-3 is in a so-called hypersoft state, where the radio and hard X-ray fluxes are found to be at their lowest values (or non-detected), the soft X-ray flux is at its highest values, and sporadic gamma-ray emission is observed. We will utilize multiwavelength observations in order to study the nature of the hypersoft state. We observed Cygnus X-3 during the hypersoft state with Swift and NuSTAR in the X-rays and SMA, AMI-LA, and RATAN-600 in the radio. We also considered X-ray monitoring data from MAXI and $\gamma$-ray monitoring data from AGILE and Fermi. We found that the spectra and timing properties of the multiwavelength observations can be explained by a scenario where the jet production is turned off or highly diminished in the hypersoft state and the missing jet pressure allows the wind to refill the region close to the black hole. The results provide proof of actual jet quenching in soft states of X-ray binaries.
  • We report results from TeV gamma-ray observations of the microquasar Cygnus X-3. The observations were made with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) over a time period from 2007 June 11 to 2011 November 28. VERITAS is most sensitive to gamma rays at energies between 85 GeV to 30 TeV. The effective exposure time amounts to a total of about 44 hours, with the observations covering six distinct radio/X-ray states of the object. No significant TeV gamma-ray emission was detected in any of the states, nor with all observations combined. The lack of a positive signal, especially in the states where GeV gamma rays were detected, places constraints on TeV gamma-ray production in Cygnus X-3. We discuss the implications of the results.
  • We have performed a principal component analysis on the X-ray spectra of the microquasar Cygnus X-3 from RXTE, INTEGRAL and Swift during a major flare ejection event in 2006 May-July. The analysis showed that there are two main variability components in play, i.e. two principal components explained almost all the variability in the X-ray lightcurves. According to the spectral shape of these components and spectral fits to the original data, the most probable emission components corresponding to the principal components are inverse-Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung. We find that these components form a double-peaked profile when phase-folded with the peaks occurring in opposite phases. This could be due to an asymmetrical wind around the companion star with which the compact object is interacting.
  • We analyse in detail the X-ray data of the microquasar Cygnus X-3 obtained during major radio flaring episodes in 2006 with multiple observatories. The analysis consists of two parts: probing the fast (~ 1 minute) X-ray spectral evolution with Principal Component Analysis followed by subsequent spectral fits to the time-averaged spectra (~ 3 ks). Based on the analysis we find that the overall X-ray variability during major flaring episodes can be attributed to two principal components whose evolution based on spectral fits is best reproduced by a hybrid Comptonization component and a bremsstrahlung or saturated thermal Comptonization component. The variability of the thermal component is found to be linked to the change in the X-ray/radio spectral state. In addition, we find that the seed photons for the Comptonization originate in two seed photon populations that include the additional thermal emission and emission from the accretion disc. The Comptonization of the photons from the thermal component dominates, at least during the major radio flare episode in question, and the Comptonization of disc photons is intermittent and can be attributed to the phase interval 0.2-0.4. The most likely location for Comptonization is in the shocks in the jet.
  • We have re-analyzed archival RXTE data of the X-ray binary Cygnus X-3 with a view to investigate the timing properties of the source. As compared to previous studies, we use an extensive sample of observations that include all the radio/X-ray spectral states that have been categorized in the source recently. In this study we identify two additional instances of Quasi-Periodic Oscillations that have centroid frequencies in the mHz regime. These events are all associated to a certain extent with major radio flaring, that in turn is associated with relativistic jet ejection events. We review briefly scenarios whereby the Quasi-Periodic Oscillations may arise.
  • Cygnus X-3 is one of the brightest X-ray and radio sources in the Galaxy, and is well known for its erratic behaviour in X-rays as well as in the radio, occasionally producing major radio flares associated with relativistic ejections. However, even after many years of observations in various wavelength bands Cyg X-3 still eludes clear physical understanding. Studying different emission bands simultaneously in microquasars has proved to be a fruitful approach towards understanding these systems, especially by shedding light on the accretion disc/jet connection. We continue this legacy by constructing a hardness-intensity diagram (HID) from archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data and linking simultaneous radio observations to it. We find that surprisingly Cyg X-3 sketches a similar shape in the HID to that seen in other transient black hole X-ray binaries during outburst but with distinct differences. Together with the results of this analysis and previous studies of Cyg X-3 we conclude that the X-ray states can be assigned to six distinct states. This categorization relies heavily on the simultaneous radio observations and we identify one new X-ray state, the hypersoft state, similar to the ultrasoft state, which is associated to the quenched radio state during which there is no or very faint radio emission. Recent observations of GeV flux observed from Cyg X-3 (Tavani et al. 2009; Fermi LAT Collaboration et al. 2009) during a soft X-ray and/or radio quenched state at the onset of a major radio flare hint that a very energetic process is at work during this time, which is also when the hypersoft X-ray state is observed. In addition, Cyg X-3 shows flaring with a wide range of hardness.
  • Cygnus X-3 is a unique microquasar. Its X-ray emission shows a very strong 4.8-hour orbital modulation. But its mass-donating companion is a Wolf-Rayet star. Also unlike most other X-ray binaries Cygnus X-3 is relatively bright in the radio virtually all of the time (the exceptions being the quenched states). Cygnus X-3 also undergoes giant radio outbursts (up to 20 Jy). In this presentation we discuss and review the flaring behavior of Cygnus X-3 and its various radio/X-ray states. We present a revised set of radio/X-ray states based on Cygnus X-3's hardness-intensity diagram (HID). We also examine the connection of a certain type of activity to the reported AGILE/Fermi gamma-ray detections of Cygnus X-3.
  • We revisit the discovery outburst of the X-ray transient XTE J1550-564 during which relativistic jets were observed in 1998 September, and review the radio images obtained with the Australian Long Baseline Array, and lightcurves obtained with the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Based on HI spectra, we constrain the source distance to between 3.3 and 4.9 kpc. The radio images, taken some two days apart, show the evolution of an ejection event. The apparent separation velocity of the two outermost ejecta is at least 1.3c and may be as large as 1.9c; when relativistic effects are taken into account, the inferred true velocity is >0.8c. The flux densities appear to peak simultaneously during the outburst, with a rather flat (although still optically thin) spectral index of -0.2.
  • We present a detailed classification of the X-ray states of Cyg X-3 based on the spectral shape and a new classification of the radio states based on the long-term correlated behaviour of the radio and soft X-ray light curves. We find a sequence of correlations, starting with a positive correlation between the radio and soft X-ray fluxes in the hard spectral state, changing to a negative one at the transition to soft spectral states. The temporal evolution can be in either direction on that sequence, unless the source goes into a very weak radio state, from which it can return only following a major radio flare. The flare decline is via relatively bright radio states, which results in a hysteresis loop on the flux-flux diagram. We also study the hard X-ray light curve, and find its overall anticorrelation with the soft X-rays. During major radio flares, the radio flux responds exponentially to the level of a hard X-ray high-energy tail. We also specify the detailed correspondence between the radio states and the X-ray spectral states. We compare our results to those of black-hole and neutron-star binaries. Except for the effect of strong absorption and the energy of the high-energy break in the hard state, the X-ray spectral states of Cyg X-3 closely correspond to the canonical X-ray states of black-hole binaries. Also, the radio/X-ray correlation closely corresponds to that found in black-hole binaries, but it significantly differs from that in neutron-star binaries. Overall, our results strongly support the presence of a black hole in Cyg X-3.
  • The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the low-energy gamma-ray sky (20-1000 keV) between 1991 April and 2000 May (9.1y). Using the Earth Occultation Technique to extract flux information, a catalog of sources using data from the BATSE large area detectors has been prepared. The first part of the catalog consists of results from the monitoring of 58 sources, mostly Galactic. For these sources, we have included tables of flux and spectral data, and outburst times for transients. Light curves (or flux histories) have been placed on the world wide web. We then performed a deep-sampling of 179 objects (including the aforementioned 58 objects) combining data from the entire 9.1y BATSE dataset. Source types considered were primarily accreting binaries, but a small number of representative active galaxies, X-ray-emitting stars, and supernova remnants were also included. The deep sample results include definite detections of 83 objects and possible detections of 36 additional objects. The definite detections spanned three classes of sources: accreting black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies and supernova remnants. Flux data for the deep sample are presented in four energy bands: 20-40, 40-70, 70-160, and 160-430 keV. The limiting average flux level (9.1 y) for the sample varies from 3.5 to 20 mCrab (5 sigma) between 20 and 430 keV, depending on systematic error, which in turn is primarily dependent on the sky location. To strengthen the credibility of detection of weaker sources (5-25 mCrab), we generated Earth occultation images, searched for periodic behavior using FFT and epoch folding methods, and critically evaluated the energy-dependent emission in the four flux bands.
  • We report on the discovery of a 590 days long term periodicity in the hard X-ray component of the microquasar \grs found from a comprehensive study of more than four years of {\it RXTE} observations. The periodicity is also observed in the hard X-ray flux observed by BATSE, and in the radio flux as seen with the {\it Green Bank Interferometer} and the {\it Ryle Telescope}. We discuss various possible explanations, including the precession of a radiation induced warped accretion disk.
  • The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has triggered on 1637 cosmic gamma-ray bursts between 1991 April 19 and 1996 August 29. These events constitute the Fourth BATSE burst catalog. The current version (4Br) has been revised from the version first circulated on CD-ROM in September 1997 (4B) to include improved locations for a subset of bursts that have been reprocssed using additional data. A significant difference from previous BATSE catalogs is the inclusion of bursts from periods when the trigger energy range differed from the nominal 50-300 keV. We present tables of the burst occurrence times, locations, peak fluxes, fluences, and durations. In general, results from previous BATSE catalogs are confirmed here with greater statistical significance.
  • Cyg X-3 is an unusual X-ray binary which shows remarkable correlative behavior between the hard X-ray, soft X-ray, and the radio. We present an analysis of these long term light curves in the context of spectral changes of the system. This analysis will also incorporate a set of pointed RXTE observations made during a period when Cyg X-3 made a transition from a quiescent radio state to a flaring state (including a major flare) and then returned to a quiescent radio state.
  • Using CGRO/BATSE hard X-ray (HXR) data and GHz radio monitoring data from the Green Bank Interferometer (GBI), we have performed a long term study ($\sim$ 1800 days) of the unusual X-ray binary Cyg X-3 resulting in the discovery of a remarkable relationship between these two wavelength bands. We find that, during quiescent radio states, the radio flux is strongly anticorrelated with the intensity of the HXR emission. The relationship switches to a correlation with the onset of major radio flaring activity. During major radio flaring activity the HXR drops to a very low intensity during quenching in the radio and recovers during the radio flare. Injection of plasma into the radio jets of Cyg X-3 occurs during changes in the HXR emission and suggests that disk-related and jet-related components are responsible for the high energy emission.
  • The operation of CGRO/BATSE continues to produce, after more than 5 years, a valuable database for the study of long-term variability in bright hard X-ray sources. The all-sky capability of BATSE provides, using the Earth occultation technique, up to approximately 30 flux measurements per day for each source. The long BATSE baseline and the numerous rising and setting occultation flux measurements allow searches for periodic and quasi-periodic signals from hours to hundreds of days. We present initial results from our study of the hard X-ray variability in 24 of the brightest BATSE sources. Power density spectra are computed for each source. In addition, we present profiles of the hard X-ray orbital modulations in 8 X-ray binaries (Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, Cyg X-3, GX 301-2, Her X-1, OAO1657-415, Vela X-1 and 4U1700-37), several-hundred-day modulations in the amplitude and width of the main high state in the 35-day cycle in Her X-1, and variations in outburst durations and intensities in the recurrent X-ray transients.