• Recently many investigations have considered Majorana dark matter co-annihilating with bound states formed by a strongly interacting scalar field. However only the gluon radiation contribution to bound state formation and dissociation, which at high temperatures is subleading to soft 2->2 scatterings, has been included. Making use of a non-relativistic effective theory framework and solving a plasma-modified Schrodinger equation, we address the effect of soft 2->2 scatterings as well as the thermal dissociation of bound states. We argue that the mass splitting between the Majorana and scalar field has in general both a lower and an upper bound, and that the dark matter mass scale can be pushed at least up to 5...6 TeV.
  • Studies of non-equilibrium dynamics of cosmological phase transitions may involve a scalar field interacting weakly with the energy-momentum tensor of a thermal plasma. At late times, when the scalar field is approaching equilibrium, it experiences both damping and thermal fluctuations. We show that thermal fluctuations induce a shear viscosity and a gravitational wave production rate, and propose that including this tunable contribution may help in calibrating the measurement of the gravitational wave production rate in hydrodynamic simulations. Furthermore it may enrich their physical scope, permitting in particular for a study of the instability of growing bubbles.
  • We analyze 3-loop contributions to the gauge coupling felt by ultrasoft ("magnetostatic") modes in hot Yang-Mills theory. So-called soft/hard terms, originating from dimension-six operators within the soft effective theory, are shown to cancel 1097/1098 of the IR divergence found in a recent determination of the hard 3-loop contribution to the soft gauge coupling. The remaining 1/1098 originates from ultrasoft/hard contributions, induced by dimension-six operators in the ultrasoft effective theory. Soft 3-loop contributions are likewise computed, and are found to be IR divergent, rendering the ultrasoft gauge coupling non-perturbative at relative order O(alphas^{3/2}). We elaborate on the implications of these findings for effective theory studies of physical observables in thermal QCD.
  • The scenario of baryogenesis through GeV-scale sterile neutrino oscillations is governed by non-linear differential equations for the time evolution of a sterile neutrino density matrix and Standard Model lepton and baryon asymmetries. By employing up-to-date rate coefficients and a non-perturbatively estimated Chern-Simons diffusion rate, we present a numerical solution of this system, incorporating the full momentum and helicity dependences of the density matrix. The density matrix deviates significantly from kinetic equilibrium, with the IR modes equilibrating much faster than the UV modes. For equivalent input parameters, our final results differ moderately (~50%) from recent benchmarks in the literature. The possibility of producing an observable baryon asymmetry is nevertheless confirmed. We illustrate the dependence of the baryon asymmetry on the sterile neutrino mass splitting and on the CP-violating phase measurable in active neutrino oscillation experiments.
  • The pseudoscalar correlator is an ideal lattice probe for thermal modifications to quarkonium spectra, given that it is not compromised by a contribution from a large transport peak. We construct a perturbative spectral function incorporating resummed thermal effects around the threshold and vacuum asymptotics above the threshold, and compare the corresponding imaginary-time correlators with continuum-extrapolated lattice data for quenched SU(3) at several temperatures. Modest differences are observed, which may originate from non-perturbative mass shifts or renormalization factors, however no resonance peaks are needed for describing the quenched lattice data for charmonium at and above T ~ 1.1Tc ~ 350 MeV. For comparison, in the bottomonium case a good description of the lattice data is obtained with a spectral function containing a single thermally broadened resonance peak.
  • We apply a formalism accounting for thermal effects (such as modified Sommerfeld effect; Salpeter correction; decohering scatterings; dissociation of bound states), to one of the simplest WIMP-like dark matter models, associated with an "inert" Higgs doublet. A broad temperature range T ~ M/20...M/10^4 is considered, stressing the importance and less-understood nature of late annihilation stages. Even though only weak interactions play a role, we find that resummed real and virtual corrections increase the tree-level overclosure bound by 1...18%, depending on quartic couplings and mass splittings.
  • Starting from operator equations of motion and making arguments based on a separation of time scales, a set of equations is derived which govern the non-equilibrium time evolution of a GeV-scale sterile neutrino density matrix and active lepton number densities at temperatures T > 130 GeV. The density matrix possesses generation and helicity indices; we demonstrate how helicity permits for a classification of various sources for leptogenesis. The coefficients parametrizing the equations are determined to leading order in Standard Model couplings, accounting for the LPM resummation of 1+n <-> 2+n scatterings and for all 2 <-> 2 scatterings. The regime in which sphaleron processes gradually decouple so that baryon plus lepton number becomes a separate non-equilibrium variable is also considered.
  • Theories with extended Higgs sectors constructed in view of cosmological ramifications (gravitational wave signal, baryogenesis, dark matter) are often faced with conflicting requirements for their couplings; in particular those influencing the strength of a phase transition may be large. Large couplings compromise perturbative studies, as well as the high-temperature expansion that is invoked in dimensionally reduced lattice investigations. With the example of the inert doublet extension of the Standard Model (IDM), we show how a resummed 2-loop effective potential can be computed without a high-T expansion, and use the result to scrutinize its accuracy. With the exception of Tc, which is sensitive to contributions from heavy modes, the high-T expansion is found to perform well. 2-loop corrections weaken the transition in IDM, but they are moderate, whereby a strong transition remains an option.
  • Open and hidden heavy-flavor physics in high-energy nuclear collisions are entering a new and exciting stage towards reaching a clearer understanding of the new experimental results with the possibility to link them directly to the advancement in lattice Quantum Chromo-dynamics (QCD). Recent results from experiments and theoretical developments regarding open and hidden heavy-flavor dynamics have been debated at the Lorentz Workshop "Tomography of the quark-gluon plasma with heavy quarks}, which was held in October 2016 in Leiden, the Netherlands. In this contribution, we summarize identified common understandings and developed strategies for the upcoming five years, which aim at achieving a profound knowledge of the dynamical properties of the quark-gluon plasma.
  • R. Adhikari, M. Agostini, N. Anh Ky, T. Araki, M. Archidiacono, M. Bahr, J. Baur, J. Behrens, F. Bezrukov, P.S. Bhupal Dev, D. Borah, A. Boyarsky, A. de Gouvea, C.A. de S. Pires, H.J. de Vega, A.G. Dias, P. Di Bari, Z. Djurcic, K. Dolde, H. Dorrer, M. Durero, O. Dragoun, M. Drewes, G. Drexlin, Ch.E. Düllmann, K. Eberhardt, S. Eliseev, C. Enss, N.W. Evans, A. Faessler, P. Filianin, V. Fischer, A. Fleischmann, J.A. Formaggio, J. Franse, F.M. Fraenkle, C.S. Frenk, G. Fuller, L. Gastaldo, A. Garzilli, C. Giunti, F. Glück, M.C. Goodman, M.C. Gonzalez-Garcia, D. Gorbunov, J. Hamann, V. Hannen, S. Hannestad, S.H. Hansen, C. Hassel, J. Heeck, F. Hofmann, T. Houdy, A. Huber, D. Iakubovskyi, A. Ianni, A. Ibarra, R. Jacobsson, T. Jeltema, J. Jochum, S. Kempf, T. Kieck, M. Korzeczek, V. Kornoukhov, T. Lachenmaier, M. Laine, P. Langacker, T. Lasserre, J. Lesgourgues, D. Lhuillier, Y. F. Li, W. Liao, A.W. Long, M. Maltoni, G. Mangano, N.E. Mavromatos, N. Menci, A. Merle, S. Mertens, A. Mirizzi, B. Monreal, A. Nozik, A. Neronov, V. Niro, Y. Novikov, L. Oberauer, E. Otten, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, M. Pallavicini, V.S. Pantuev, E. Papastergis, S. Parke, S. Pascoli, S. Pastor, A. Patwardhan, A. Pilaftsis, D.C. Radford, P. C.-O. Ranitzsch, O. Rest, D.J. Robinson, P.S. Rodrigues da Silva, O. Ruchayskiy, N.G. Sanchez, M. Sasaki, N. Saviano, A. Schneider, F. Schneider, T. Schwetz, S. Schönert, S. Scholl, F. Shankar, R. Shrock, N. Steinbrink, L. Strigari, F. Suekane, B. Suerfu, R. Takahashi, N. Thi Hong Van, I. Tkachev, M. Totzauer, Y. Tsai, C.G. Tully, K. Valerius, J.W.F. Valle, D. Venos, M. Viel, M. Vivier, M.Y. Wang, C. Weinheimer, K. Wendt, L. Winslow, J. Wolf, M. Wurm, Z. Xing, S. Zhou, K. Zuber
    We present a comprehensive review of keV-scale sterile neutrino Dark Matter, collecting views and insights from all disciplines involved - cosmology, astrophysics, nuclear, and particle physics - in each case viewed from both theoretical and experimental/observational perspectives. After reviewing the role of active neutrinos in particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, we focus on sterile neutrinos in the context of the Dark Matter puzzle. Here, we first review the physics motivation for sterile neutrino Dark Matter, based on challenges and tensions in purely cold Dark Matter scenarios. We then round out the discussion by critically summarizing all known constraints on sterile neutrino Dark Matter arising from astrophysical observations, laboratory experiments, and theoretical considerations. In this context, we provide a balanced discourse on the possibly positive signal from X-ray observations. Another focus of the paper concerns the construction of particle physics models, aiming to explain how sterile neutrinos of keV-scale masses could arise in concrete settings beyond the Standard Model of elementary particle physics. The paper ends with an extensive review of current and future astrophysical and laboratory searches, highlighting new ideas and their experimental challenges, as well as future perspectives for the discovery of sterile neutrinos.
  • We consider non-relativistic "dark" particles interacting through gauge boson exchange. At finite temperature, gauge exchange is modified in many ways: virtual corrections lead to Debye screening; real corrections amount to frequent scatterings of the heavy particles on light plasma constituents; mixing angles change. In a certain temperature and energy range, these effects are of order unity. Taking them into account in a resummed form, we estimate the near-threshold spectrum of kinetically equilibrated annihilating TeV scale particles. Weakly bound states are shown to "melt" below freeze-out, whereas with attractive strong interactions, relevant e.g. for gluinos, bound states boost the annihilation rate by a factor 4...80 with respect to the Sommerfeld estimate, thereby perhaps helping to avoid overclosure of the universe. Modestly non-degenerate dark sector masses and a way to combine the contributions of channels with different gauge and spin structures are also discussed.
  • The Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study is aimed at assessing the physics potential and the technical feasibility of a new collider with centre-of-mass energies, in the hadron-hadron collision mode, seven times larger than the nominal LHC energies. Operating such machine with heavy ions is an option that is being considered in the accelerator design studies. It would provide, for example, Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 39 and 63 TeV, respectively, per nucleon-nucleon collision, with integrated luminosities above 30 nb^-1 per month for Pb-Pb. This is a report by the working group on heavy-ion physics of the FCC Study. First ideas on the physics opportunities with heavy ions at the FCC are presented, covering the physics of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, of gluon saturation, of photon-induced collisions, as well as connections with other fields of high-energy physics.
  • The co-annihilation rate of heavy particles close to thermal equilibrium, which plays a role in many classic dark matter scenarios, can be "simulated" in QCD by considering the pair annihilation rate of a heavy quark and antiquark at a temperature of a few hundred MeV. We show that the so-called Sommerfeld factors, parameterizing the rate, can be defined and measured non-perturbatively within the NRQCD framework. Lattice measurements indicate a modest suppression in the octet channel, in reasonable agreement with perturbation theory, and a large enhancement in the singlet channel, much above the perturbative prediction. The additional enhancement is suggested to originate from bound state formation and subsequent decay. Making use of a Green's function based method to incorporate thermal corrections in perturbative co-annihilation rate computations, we show that qualitative agreement with lattice data can be found once thermally broadened bound states are accounted for. We suggest that our formalism may also be applicable to specific dark matter models which have complicated bound state structures.
  • We estimate the photon production rate from an SU(3) plasma at temperatures of about 1.1Tc and 1.3Tc. Lattice results for the vector current correlator at spatial momenta k ~ (2-6)T are extrapolated to the continuum limit and analyzed with the help of a polynomial interpolation for the corresponding spectral function, which vanishes at zero frequency and matches to high-precision perturbative results at large invariant masses. For small invariant masses the interpolation is compared with the NLO weak-coupling result, hydrodynamics, and a holographic model. At vanishing invariant mass we extract the photon rate which for k \gsim 3T is found to be close to the NLO weak-coupling prediction. For k \lsim 2T uncertainties remain large but the photon rate is likely to fall below the NLO prediction, in accordance with the onset of a strongly interacting behaviour characteristic of the hydrodynamic regime.
  • We estimate the thermal masses and damping rates of active (m < eV) and sterile (M ~ GeV) neutrinos with thermal momenta k ~ 3T at temperatures below the electroweak crossover (5 GeV < T < 160 GeV). These quantities fix the equilibration or "washout" rates of Standard Model lepton number densities. Sterile neutrinos interact via direct scatterings mediated by Yukawa couplings, and via their overlap with active neutrinos. Including all leading-order reactions we find that the washout rate generally exceeds the Hubble rate for 5 GeV < T < 30 GeV. Therefore it is challenging to generate a large lepton asymmetry facilitating dark matter computations operating at T < 5 GeV, whereas the generation of a baryon asymmetry at T > 130 GeV remains an option. Our differential rates are tabulated in a form suitable for studies of specific scenarios with given neutrino Yukawa matrices.
  • The momentum diffusion coefficient of a heavy quark in a hot QCD plasma can be extracted as a transport coefficient related to the correlator of two colour-electric fields dressing a Polyakov loop. We determine the perturbative renormalization factor for a particular lattice discretization of this correlator within Wilson's SU(3) gauge theory, finding a ~12% NLO correction for values of the bare coupling used in the current generation of simulations. The impact of this result on existing lattice determinations is commented upon, and a possibility for non-perturbative renormalization through the gradient flow is pointed out.
  • We estimate the momentum diffusion coefficient of a heavy quark within a pure SU(3) plasma at a temperature of about 1.5Tc. Large-scale Monte Carlo simulations on a series of lattices extending up to 192^3*48 permit us to carry out a continuum extrapolation of the so-called colour-electric imaginary-time correlator. The extrapolated correlator is analyzed with the help of theoretically motivated models for the corresponding spectral function. Evidence for a non-zero transport coefficient is found and, incorporating systematic uncertainties reflecting model assumptions, we obtain kappa = (1.8 - 3.4)T^3. This implies that the "drag coefficient", characterizing the time scale at which heavy quarks adjust to hydrodynamic flow, is (1.8 - 3.4) (Tc/T)^2 (M/1.5GeV) fm/c, where M is the heavy quark kinetic mass. The results apply to bottom and, with somewhat larger systematic uncertainties, to charm quarks.
  • The putative recent indication of an unidentified 3.55 keV X-ray line in certain astrophysical sources is taken as a motivation for an improved theoretical computation of the cosmological abundance of 7.1 keV sterile neutrinos. If the line is interpreted as resulting from the decay of Warm Dark Matter, the mass and mixing angle of the sterile neutrino are known. Our computation then permits for a determination of the lepton asymmetry that is needed for producing the correct abundance via the Shi-Fuller mechanism, as well as for an estimate of the non-equilibrium spectrum of the sterile neutrinos. The latter plays a role in structure formation simulations. Results are presented for different flavour structures of the neutrino Yukawa couplings and for different types of pre-existing lepton asymmetries, accounting properly for the charge neutrality of the plasma and incorporating approximately hadronic contributions.
  • Even though the Standard Model with a Higgs mass mH = 125 GeV possesses no bulk phase transition, its thermodynamics still experiences a "soft point" at temperatures around T = 160 GeV, with a deviation from ideal gas thermodynamics. Such a deviation may have an effect on precision computations of weakly interacting dark matter relic abundances if their mass is in the few TeV range, or on leptogenesis scenarios operating in this temperature range. By making use of results from lattice simulations based on a dimensionally reduced effective field theory, we estimate the relevant thermodynamic functions across the crossover. The results are tabulated in a numerical form permitting for their insertion as a background equation of state into cosmological particle production/decoupling codes. We find that Higgs dynamics induces a non-trivial "structure" visible e.g. in the heat capacity, but that in general the largest radiative corrections originate from QCD effects, reducing the energy density by a couple of percent from the free value even at T > 160 GeV.
  • Because of physical processes ranging from microscopic particle collisions to macroscopic hydrodynamic fluctuations, any plasma in thermal equilibrium emits gravitational waves. For the largest wavelengths the emission rate is proportional to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In the Standard Model at T > 160 GeV, the shear viscosity is dominated by the most weakly interacting particles, right-handed leptons, and is relatively large. We estimate the order of magnitude of the corresponding spectrum of gravitational waves. Even though at small frequencies (corresponding to the sub-Hz range relevant for planned observatories such as eLISA) this background is tiny compared with that from non-equilibrium sources, the total energy carried by the high-frequency part of the spectrum is non-negligible if the production continues for a long time. We suggest that this may constrain (weakly) the highest temperature of the radiation epoch. Observing the high-frequency part directly sets a very ambitious goal for future generations of GHz-range detectors.
  • We explore a method developed in statistical physics which has been argued to have exponentially small finite-volume effects, in order to determine the critical temperature Tc of pure SU(3) gauge theory close to the continuum limit. The method allows us to estimate the critical coupling betac of the Wilson action for temporal extents up to Nt ~ 20 with < 0.1% uncertainties. Making use of the scale setting parameters r0 and sqrt{t0} in the same range of beta-values, these results lead to the independent continuum extrapolations Tc r0 = 0.7457(45) and Tc sqrt{t0} = 0.2489(14), with the latter originating from a more convincing fit. Inserting a conversion of r0 from literature (unfortunately with much larger errors) yields Tc / LambdaMSbar = 1.24(10).
  • In the range of temperatures reached in future heavy ion collision experiments, hadronic pair annihilations and creations of charm quarks may take place within the lifetime of the plasma. As a result, charm quarks may increase the bulk viscosity affecting the early stages of hydrodynamic expansion. Assuming thermalization, we estimate the charm contribution to bulk viscosity within the same effective kinetic theory framework in which the light parton contribution has been computed previously. The time scale at which this physics becomes relevant is related to the width of the transport peak associated with the trace anomaly correlator, and is found to be < 20 fm/c for T > 600 MeV.
  • NLO and LPM-resummed computations of thermal dilepton production from a hot QCD plasma are reviewed. An interpolation applicable for all positive photon invariant masses is presented, and possibilities for comparisons with lattice and experimental data are pointed out.
  • The production rate of right-handed neutrinos from a Standard Model plasma at a temperature above a hundred GeV has previously been evaluated up to NLO in Standard Model couplings (g ~ 2/3) in relativistic (M ~ pi T) and non-relativistic regimes (M >> pi T), and up to LO in an ultrarelativistic regime (M < gT). The last result necessitates an all-orders resummation of the loop expansion, accounting for multiple soft scatterings of the nearly light-like particles participating in 1 <-> 2 reactions. In this paper we suggest how the regimes can be interpolated into a result applicable for any right-handed neutrino mass and at all temperatures above 160 GeV. The results can also be used for determining the lepton number washout rate in models containing right-handed neutrinos. Numerical results are given in a tabulated form permitting for their incorporation into leptogenesis codes. We note that due to effects from soft Higgs bosons there is a narrow intermediate regime around M ~ g^{1/2} T in which our interpolation is phenomenological and a more precise study would be welcome.
  • Strict next-to-leading order (NLO) results for the dilepton production rate from a QCD plasma at temperatures above a few hundred MeV suffer from a breakdown of the loop expansion in the regime of soft invariant masses M^2 << (pi T)^2. In this regime an LPM resummation is needed for obtaining the correct leading-order result. We show how to construct an interpolation between the hard NLO and the leading-order LPM expression. The final numerical results are presented in a tabulated form, suitable for insertion into hydrodynamical codes.