• We study entanglement and squeezing of two uncoupled impurities immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate. We treat them as two quantum Brownian particles interacting with a bath of oscillators, corresponding to the Bogoliubov modes of the condensate. The Langevin-like quantum stochastic equations derived, exhibit memory effects. We study two scenarios: (i) In the absence of an external potential, we observe sudden death of entanglement, i.e., entanglement disappears at long enough times; (ii) In the presence of an external harmonic potential, entanglement survives even at asymptotic time limit. Our study considers experimentally tunable parameters. In our analysis, we avoid introducing artificial terms in the Hamiltonian and assuming an arbitrary spectral density.
  • Topological insulators are exotic material that possess conducting surface states protected by the topology of the system. They can be classified in terms of their properties under discrete symmetries and are characterized by topological invariants. The latter has been measured experimentally for several models in one, two and three dimensions in both condensed matter and quantum simulation platforms. The recent progress in quantum simulation opens the road to the simulation of higher dimensional Hamiltonians and in particular of the 4D quantum Hall effect. These systems are characterized by the second Chern number, a topological invariant that appears in the quantization of the transverse conductivity for the non-linear response to both external magnetic and electric fields. This quantity cannot always be computed analytically and there is therefore a need of an algorithm to compute it numerically. In this work, we propose an efficient algorithm to compute the second Chern number in 4D systems. We construct the algorithm with the help of lattice gauge theory and discuss the convergence to the continuous gauge theory. We benchmark the algorithm on several relevant models, including the 4D Dirac Hamiltonian and the 4D quantum Hall effect and verify numerically its rapid convergence.
  • We introduce a model, in which a particle performs a continuous time random walk (CTRW) coupled to an environment with Ising dynamics. The particle shows locally varying diffusivity determined by the geometrical properties of the underlying Ising environment, that is, the diffusivity depends on the size of the connected area of spins pointing in the same direction. The model shows anomalous diffusion when the Ising environment is at critical temperature. We show that any finite scale introduced by a temperature different from the critical one, or a finite size of the environment, cause subdiffusion only during a transient time. The characteristic time, at which the system returns to normal diffusion after the subdiffusive plateau depends on the limiting scale and on how close the temperature is to criticality. The system also displays apparent ergodicity breaking at intermediate time, while ergodicity breaking at longer time occurs only under the idealized infinite environment at the critical temperature.
  • We study high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in model atoms driven by plasmonic-enhanced fields. These fields result from the illumination of plasmonic nanostructures by few-cycle laser pulses. We demonstrate that the spatial inhomogeneous character of the laser electric field, in a form of Gaussian-shaped functions, leads to an unexpected relationship between the HHG cutoff and the laser wavelength. Precise description of the spatial form of the plasmonic-enhanced field allows us to predict this relationship. We combine the numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE) with the plasmonic-enhanced electric fields obtained from 3D finite element simulations. We additionally employ classical simulations to supplement the TDSE outcomes and characterize the extended HHG spectra by means of their associated electron trajectories. A proper definition of the spatially inhomogeneous laser electric field is instrumental to accurately describe the underlying physics of HHG driven by plasmonic-enhanced fields. This characterization opens new perspectives for HHG control with various experimental nano-setups
  • Understanding the robustness of topological phases of matter in the presence of strong interactions, and synthesising novel strongly-correlated topological materials, lie among the most important and difficult challenges of modern theoretical and experimental physics. In this work, we present a complete theoretical analysis of the synthetic Creutz-Hubbard ladder, which is a paradigmatic model that provides a neat playground to address these challenges. We put special attention to the competition of correlated topological phases and orbital quantum magnetism in the regime of strong interactions. These results are furthermore confirmed and extended by extensive numerical simulations. Moreover we propose how to experimentally realize this model in a synthetic ladder, made of two internal states of ultracold fermionic atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Our work paves the way towards quantum simulators of interacting topological insulators with cold atoms.
  • A possible route to extract electronic and nuclear dynamics from molecular targets with attosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution is to employ recolliding electrons as `probes'. The recollision process in molecules is, however, very challenging to treat using {\it ab initio} approaches. Even for the simplest diatomic systems, such as H$_2$, today's computational capabilities are not enough to give a complete description of the electron and nuclear dynamics initiated by a strong laser field. As a consequence, approximate qualitative descriptions are called to play an important role. In this contribution we extend the work presented in N. Su\'arez {\it et al.}, Phys.~Rev. A {\bf 95}, 033415 (2017), to three-center molecular targets. Additionally, we incorporate a more accurate description of the molecular ground state, employing information extracted from quantum chemistry software packages. This step forward allows us to include, in a detailed way, both the molecular symmetries and nodes present in the high-occupied molecular orbital. We are able to, on the one hand, keep our formulation as analytical as in the case of diatomics, and, on the other hand, to still give a complete description of the underlying physics behind the above-threshold ionization process. The application of our approach to complex multicenter - with more than 3 centers, targets appears to be straightforward.
  • Topological insulators are fascinating states of matter exhibiting protected edge states and robust quantized features in their bulk. Here, we propose and validate experimentally a method to detect topological properties in the bulk of one-dimensional chiral systems. We first introduce the mean chiral displacement, and we show that it rapidly approaches a multiple of the Zak phase in the long time limit. Then we measure the Zak phase in a photonic quantum walk, by direct observation of the mean chiral displacement in its bulk. Next, we measure the Zak phase in an alternative, inequivalent timeframe, and combine the two windings to characterize the full phase diagram of this Floquet system. Finally, we prove the robustness of the measure by introducing dynamical disorder in the system. This detection method is extremely general, as it can be applied to all one-dimensional platforms simulating static or Floquet chiral systems.
  • Spatiotemporal disorder has been recently associated to the occurrence of anomalous nonergodic diffusion of molecular components in biological systems, but the underlying microscopic mechanism is still unclear. We introduce a model in which a particle performs continuous Brownian motion with changes of diffusion coefficients induced by transient molecular interactions with diffusive binding partners. In spite of the exponential distribution of waiting times, the model shows subdiffusion and nonergodicity similar to the heavy-tailed continuous time random walk. The dependence of these properties on the density of binding partners is analyzed and discussed. Our work provide an experimentally-testable microscopic model to investigate the nature of nonergodicity in disordered media.
  • We demonstrate how quantum interference may lead to the appearance of robust edge-like states of a single ultracold atom in a two-dimensional optical ribbon. We show that these states can be engineered either within the manifold of local ground states of the sites forming the ribbon, or of states carrying one unit of angular momentum. In the former case, we show that the implementation of edge-like states can be extended to other geometries, such as tilted square lattices. In the latter case, we suggest to use the winding number associated to the angular momentum as a synthetic dimension.
  • Topological band structures can be designed by subjecting lattice systems to time-periodic modulations, as was recently demonstrated in cold atoms and photonic crystals. However, changing the topological nature of Floquet Bloch bands from trivial to non-trivial, by progressively launching the time-modulation, is necessarily accompanied with gap-closing processes: this has important consequences for the loading of particles into a target Floquet band with non-trivial topology, and hence, on the subsequent measurements. In this work, we analyse how such loading sequences can be optimized in view of probing the topology of Floquet bands through transport measurements. In particular, we demonstrate the robustness of center-of-mass responses, as compared to current responses, which present important irregularities due to an interplay between the micro-motion of the drive and inter-band interference effects. The results presented in this work illustrate how probing the center-of-mass displacement of atomic clouds offers a reliable method to detect the topology of Floquet bands, after realistic loading sequences.
  • An ambipolar $n$-$p$ double quantum dot defined by potential variation along a semiconducting carbon-nanotube is considered. We focus on the (1e,1h) charge configuration with a single excess electron in the conduction band state confined in the $n$-type dot and a single missing electron in the valence band state of the $p$-dot for which lifting of the Pauli blockade of the current was observed in the electric-dipole spin resonance [E. A. Laird et al. Nat. Nanotech. 8 , 565 (2013)]. The dynamics of the system driven by periodic electric field is studied with the Floquet theory and the time-dependent configuration interaction method with the single-electron spin-valley-orbitals determined for atomistic tight-binding Hamiltonian. We find that the transitions lifting the Pauli blockade are strongly influenced by coupling to a vacuum state with an empty $n$ dot and a fully filled $p$ dot. The coupling shifts the transition energies and strongly modifies the effective $g$ factors for axial magnetic field. The coupling is modulated by the bias between the dots but it appears effective for surprisingly large energy splitting between the (1e,1h) ground state and the vacuum (0e,0h) state. Multiphoton transitions and high harmonic generation effects are also discussed.
  • Electron-electron correlation effects play an instrumental role in our understanding of sequential (SDI) and non-sequential double ionization (NSDI) mechanisms. Here, we present a theoretical study of NSDI driven by plasmonic-enhanced spatial inhomogeneous fields. By numerically solving the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation for a linear reduced model of He and a double-electron time-evolution probability analysis, we provide evidence for the enhancement effects in NSDI showing that the double ionization yield at lower laser peak intensities is increased due to the inhomogeneity of the laser field. Furthermore, our quantum mechanical model, as well as classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, show that inhomogeneous fields are a useful tool for splitting the binary and recoil processes in the rescattering scenario.
  • Studies of strong field ionization have historically relied on the strong field approximation, which neglects all spatial dependence in the forces experienced by the electron after ionization. More recently, the small spatial inhomogeneity introduced by the long-range Coulomb potential has been linked to a number of important features in the photoelectron spectrum, such as Coulomb asymmetry, Coulomb focusing, and the low energy structure (LES). Here, we demonstrate by combined quantum and classical simulations that a small time-varying spatial dependence in the laser electric field creates a prominent higher energy peak at energies above the "classical cut-off" for direct electrons. This higher energy structure (HES) originates from direct electrons ionized near the peak of a single half-cycle of the laser pulse. The HES is separated from all other ionization events (providing sub-cycle resolution) and is highly sensitive to the carrier envelope phase (CEP). The large accumulation of electrons with tuneable energy suggests a promising method for creating a localized source of electron pulses of attosecond duration using tabletop laser technology.
  • Strong field photoemission and electron recollision provide a viable route to extract electronic and nuclear dynamics from molecular targets with attosecond temporal resolution. However, since an {\em ab-initio} treatment of even the simplest diatomic systems is beyond today's capabilities approximate qualitative descriptions are warranted. In this paper, we develop such a theoretical approach to model the photoelectrons resulting from intense laser-molecule interaction. We present a general theory for symmetric diatomic molecules in the single active electron approximation that, amongst other capabilities, allows adjusting both the internuclear separation and molecular potential in a direct and simple way. More importantly we derive an analytic approximate solution of the time dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE), based on a generalized strong field approximation (SFA) version. Using that approach we obtain expressions for electrons emitted transition amplitudes from two different molecular centres, and accelerated then in the strong laser field. One innovative aspect of our theory is the fact that the dipole matrix elements are free from non-physical gauge and coordinate system dependent terms -- this is achieved by adapting the coordinate system, in which SFA is performed, to the centre from which the corresponding part of the time dependent wave function originates. Our analytic results agree very well with the numerical solution of the full three-dimensional TDSE for the H$_2^+$ molecule. Moreover, the theoretical model was applied to describe laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) measurements of O$_2^+$ molecules, obtained at ICFO, and reproduces the main features of the experiment very well. Our approach can be extended in a natural way to more complex molecules and multi-electron systems.
  • Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this article we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as ATI and HHG. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nano physics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the induced fields and the unique electron dynamics initiated by them with high temporal and spatial resolution.
  • Understanding the resource consumption in distributed scenarios is one of the main goals of quantum information theory. A prominent example for such a scenario is the task of quantum state merging where two parties aim to merge their parts of a tripartite quantum state. In standard quantum state merging, entanglement is considered as an expensive resource, while local quantum operations can be performed at no additional cost. However, recent developments show that some local operations could be more expensive than others: it is reasonable to distinguish between local incoherent operations and local operations which can create coherence. This idea leads us to the task of incoherent quantum state merging, where one of the parties has free access to local incoherent operations only. In this case the resources of the process are quantified by pairs of entanglement and coherence. Here, we develop tools for studying this process, and apply them to several relevant scenarios. While quantum state merging can lead to a gain of entanglement, our results imply that no merging procedure can gain entanglement and coherence at the same time. We also provide a general lower bound on the entanglement-coherence sum, and show that the bound is tight for all pure states. Our results also lead to an incoherent version of Schumacher compression: in this case the compression rate is equal to the von Neumann entropy of the diagonal elements of the corresponding quantum state.
  • We introduce and study the task of assisted coherence distillation. This task arises naturally in bipartite systems where both parties work together to generate the maximal possible coherence on one of the subsystems. Only incoherent operations are allowed on the target system while general local quantum operations are permitted on the other, an operational paradigm that we call local quantum-incoherent operations and classical communication (LQICC). We show that the asymptotic rate of assisted coherence distillation for pure states is equal to the coherence of assistance, an analog of the entanglement of assistance, whose properties we characterize. Our findings imply a novel interpretation of the von Neumann entropy: it quantifies the maximum amount of extra quantum coherence a system can gain when receiving assistance from a collaborative party. Our results are generalized to coherence localization in a multipartite setting and possible applications are discussed.
  • We investigate magnetic properties of strongly interacting four component spin-3/2 ultracold fermionic atoms in the Mott insulator limit with one particle per site in an optical lattice with honeycomb symmetry. In this limit, atomic tunneling is virtual, and only the atomic spins can exchange. We find a competition between symmetry breaking and liquid like disordered phases. Particularly interesting are valence bond states with bond centered magnetizations, situated between the ferromagnetic and conventional valence bond phases. In the framework of a mean-field theory, we calculate the phase diagram and identify an experimentally relevant parameter region where a homogeneous SU(4) symmetric Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki-like valence bond state is present.
  • We theoretically investigate high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in Rydberg atoms driven by spatially inhomogeneous laser fields, induced, for instance, by plasmonic enhancement. It is well known that the laser intensity should to exceed certain threshold in order to generate HHG, when noble gas atoms in their ground state are used as an active medium. One way to enhance the coherent light coming from a conventional laser oscillator is to take advantage of the amplification obtained by the so-called surface plasmon polaritons, created when a low intensity laser field is focused onto a metallic nanostructure. The main limitation of this scheme is the low damage threshold of the materials employed in the nanostructures engineering. In this work we propose to use Rydberg atoms, driven by spatially inhomogeneous, plasmonic-enhanced laser fields, for HHG. We exhaustively discuss the behaviour and efficiency of these systems in the generation of coherent harmonic emission. To this aim we numerically solve the time-dependent Schr\"{o}dinger equation for an atom with an electron initially in a highly excited $n$-th Rydberg state, located in the vicinity of a metallic nanostructure, where the electric field changes spatially on the scales relevant for the dynamics of the laser-ionized electron. We first use a one-dimensional model to investigate the phenomena systematically. We then employ a more realistic situation, when the interaction of a plasmonic-enhanced laser field with a three-dimensional Hydrogen atom is modelled. We discuss the scaling of the relevant input parameters with the principal quantum number $n$ of the Rydberg state in question, and demonstrate that harmonic emission could be achieved from Rydberg atoms well below the damage threshold, thus without deteriorating the geometry and properties of the metallic nanostructure.
  • We present a theoretical study of the wave packet dynamics of the H$_2^+$ molecular ion in plasmon-enhanced laser fields. Such fields may be produced, for instance, when metallic nano-structures are illuminated by a laser pulse of moderated intensity. Their main property is that they vary in space on nanometer scales. We demonstrate that the spatial inhomogeneous character of these plasmonic fields leads to an enhancement of electron localization, an instrumental phenomenon that controls molecular fragmentation. We suggest that the charge-imbalance induced by the surface-plasmon resonance near the metallic nano-structures is the origin of the increase in the electron localization.
  • We present theoretical studies of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) driven by plasmonic fields in two-electron atomic systems. Comparing the two-active electron and single-active electron approximation models of the negative hydrogen ion atom, we provide strong evidence that a double non-sequential two-electron recombination appears to be the main responsible for the HHG cutoff extension. Our analysis is carried out by means of a reduced one-dimensional numerical integration of the two-electron time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE), and on investigations of the classical electron trajectories resulting from the Newton's equation of motion. Additional comparisons between the negative hydrogen ion and the helium atom suggest that the double recombination process depends distinctly on the atomic target. Our research paves the way to the understanding of strong field processes in multi-electronic systems driven by spatially inhomogeneous fields.
  • Theoretical approaches to strong field phenomena driven by plasmonic fields are based on the length gauge formulation of the laser-matter coupling. From the theoretical viewpoint it is known there exists no preferable gauge and consequently the predictions and outcomes should be independent of this choice. The use of the length gauge is mainly due to the fact that the quantity obtained from finite elements simulations of plasmonic fields is the plasmonic enhanced laser electric field rather than the laser vector potential. In this paper we develop, from first principles, the velocity gauge formulation of the problem and we apply it to the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in atoms. A comparison to the results obtained with the length gauge is made. It is analytically and numerically demonstrated that both gauges give equivalent descriptions of the emitted HHG spectra resulting from the interaction of a spatially inhomogeneous field and the single active electron (SAE) model of the helium atom. We discuss, however, advantages and disadvantages of using different gauges in terms of numerical efficiency.
  • Contemporary understanding of correlations in quantum many-body systems and in quantum phase transitions is based to a large extent on the recent intensive studies of entanglement in many-body systems. In contrast, much less is known about the role of quantum nonlocality in these systems, mostly because the available multipartite Bell inequalities involve high-order correlations among many particles, which are hard to access theoretically, and even harder experimentally. Standard, "theorist- and experimentalist-friendly" many-body observables involve correlations among only few (one, two, rarely three...) particles. Typically, there is no multipartite Bell inequality for this scenario based on such low-order correlations. Recently, however, we have succeeded in constructing multipartite Bell inequalities that involve two- and one-body correlations only, and showed how they revealed the nonlocality in many-body systems relevant for nuclear and atomic physics [Science 344, 1256 (2014)]. With the present contribution we continue our work on this problem. On the one hand, we present a detailed derivation of the above Bell inequalities, pertaining to permutation symmetry among the involved parties. On the other hand, we present a couple of new results concerning such Bell inequalities. First, we characterize their tightness. We then discuss maximal quantum violations of these inequalities in the general case, and their scaling with the number of parties. Moreover, we provide new classes of two-body Bell inequalities which reveal nonlocality of the Dicke states---ground states of physically relevant and experimentally realizable Hamiltonians. Finally, we shortly discuss various scenarios for nonlocality detection in mesoscopic systems of trapped ions or atoms, and by atoms trapped in the vicinity of designed nanostructures.
  • We present the first theoretical investigation of carrier-wave Rabi flopping in real atoms by employing numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in alkali species. Given the short HHG cutoff, related to the low saturation intensity, we concentrate on the features of the third harmonic of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) atoms. For pulse areas of 2$\pi$ and Na atoms, a characteristic unique peak appears, which, after analyzing the ground state population, we correlate with the conventional Rabi flopping. On the other hand, for larger pulse areas, carrier-wave Rabi flopping occurs, and is associated with a more complex structure in the third harmonic. These new characteristics observed in K atoms indicate the breakdown of the area theorem, as was already demonstrated under similar circumstances in narrow band gap semiconductors.
  • Current understanding of correlations and quantum phase transitions in many-body systems has significantly improved thanks to the recent intensive studies of their entanglement properties. In contrast, much less is known about the role of quantum non-locality in these systems. On the one hand, standard, "theorist- and experimentalist-friendly" many-body observables involve correlations among only few (one, two, rarely three...) particles. On the other hand, most of the available multipartite Bell inequalities involve correlations among many particles. Such correlations are notoriously hard to access theoretically, and even harder experimentally. Typically, there is no Bell inequality for many-body systems built only from low-order correlation functions. Recently, however, it has been shown in [J. Tura et al., Science 344, 1256 (2014)] that multipartite Bell inequalities constructed only from two-body correlation functions are strong enough to reveal non-locality in some many-body states, in particular those relevant for nuclear and atomic physics. The purpose of this lecture is to provide an overview of the problem of quantum correlations in many-body systems - from entanglement to nonlocality - and the methods for their characterization.