• We present the confirmation of a small, moderately-irradiated (F = 155 +/- 7 Fearth) Neptune with a substantial gas envelope in a P=11.8728787+/-0.0000085-day orbit about a quiet, Sun-like G0V star Kepler-1655. Based on our analysis of the Kepler light curve, we determined Kepler-1655b's radius to be 2.213+/-0.082 Rearth. We acquired 95 high-resolution spectra with TNG/HARPS-N, enabling us to characterize the host star and determine an accurate mass for Kepler-1655b of 5.0+3.1/-2.8 Mearth via Gaussian-process regression. Our mass determination excludes an Earth-like composition with 98\% confidence. Kepler-1655b falls on the upper edge of the evaporation valley, in the relatively sparsely occupied transition region between rocky and gas-rich planets. It is therefore part of a population of planets that we should actively seek to characterize further.
  • M-dwarf stars are promising targets for identifying and characterizing potentially habitable planets. K2-3 is a nearby (45 pc), early-type M dwarf hosting three small transiting planets, the outermost of which orbits close to the inner edge of the stellar (optimistic) habitable zone. The K2-3 system is well suited for follow-up characterization studies aimed at determining accurate masses and bulk densities of the three planets. Using a total of 329 radial velocity measurements collected over 2.5 years with the HARPS-N and HARPS spectrographs and a proper treatment of the stellar activity signal, we aim to improve measurements of the masses and bulk densities of the K2-3 planets. We use our results to investigate the physical structure of the planets. We analyse radial velocity time series extracted with two independent pipelines by using Gaussian process regression. We adopt a quasi-periodic kernel to model the stellar magnetic activity jointly with the planetary signals. We use Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the robustness of our mass measurements of K2-3\,c and K2-3\,d, and to explore how additional high-cadence radial velocity observations might improve them. Despite the stellar activity component being the strongest signal present in the radial velocity time series, we are able to derive masses for both planet b ($M_{\rm b}=6.6\pm1.1$ $M_{\rm \oplus}$) and planet c ($M_{\rm c}=3.1^{+1.3}_{-1.2}$ $M_{\rm \oplus}$). The Doppler signal due to K2-3\,d remains undetected, likely because of its low amplitude compared to the radial velocity signal induced by the stellar activity. The closeness of the orbital period of K2-3\,d to the stellar rotation period could also make the detection of the planetary signal complicated. [...]
  • We present a thermal emission spectrum of the bloated hot Jupiter HAT-P-32Ab from a single eclipse observation made in spatial scan mode with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The spectrum covers the wavelength regime from 1.123 to 1.644 microns which is binned into 14 eclipse depths measured to an averaged precision of 104 parts-per million. The spectrum is unaffected by a dilution from the close M-dwarf companion HAT-P-32B, which was fully resolved. We complemented our spectrum with literature results and performed a comparative forward and retrieval analysis with the 1D radiative-convective ATMO model. Assuming solar abundance of the planet atmosphere, we find that the measured spectrum can best be explained by the spectrum of a blackbody isothermal atmosphere with Tp = 1995 +/- 17K, but can equally-well be described by a spectrum with modest thermal inversion. The retrieved spectrum suggests emission from VO at the WFC3 wavelengths and no evidence of the 1.4 micron water feature. The emission models with temperature profiles decreasing with height are rejected at a high confidence. An isothermal or inverted spectrum can imply a clear atmosphere with an absorber, a dusty cloud deck or a combination of both. We find that the planet can have continuum of values for the albedo and recirculation, ranging from high albedo and poor recirculation to low albedo and efficient recirculation. Optical spectroscopy of the planet's day-side or thermal emission phase curves can potentially resolve the current albedo with recirculation degeneracy.
  • The observational mass-radius relation of main sequence stars with masses between ~0.3 and 1.0 Msun reveals deviations between the stellar radii predicted by models and the observed radii of stars in detached binaries. We generate an accurate physical model of the low-mass eclipsing binary T-Cyg1-12664 in the Kepler mission field to measure the physical parameters of its components and to compare them with the prediction of theoretical stellar evolution models. We analyze the Kepler mission light curve of T-Cyg1-12664 to accurately measure the times and phases of the primary and secondary eclipse. In addition, we measure the rotational period of the primary component by analyzing the out-of-eclipse oscillations that are due to spots. We accurately constrain the effective temperature of the system using ground-based absolute photometry in B, V, Rc, and Ic. We also obtain and analyze V, Rc, Ic differential light curves to measure the eccentricity and the orbital inclination of the system, and a precise Teff ratio. From the joint analysis of new radial velocities and those in the literature we measure the individual masses of the stars. Finally, we use the PHOEBE code to generate a physical model of the system. T-Cyg1-12664 is a low eccentricity system, located d=360+/-22 pc away from us, with an orbital period of P=4.1287955(4) days, and an orbital inclination i=86.969+/-0.056 degrees. It is composed of two very different stars with an active G6 primary with Teff1=5560+/-160 K, M1=0.680+/-0.045 Msun, R1=0.799+/-0.017 Rsun, and a M3V secondary star with Teff2=3460+/-210 K, M2=0.376+/-0.017 Msun, and R2=0.3475+/-0.0081 Rsun. The primary star is an oversized and spotted active star, hotter than the stars in its mass range. The secondary is a cool star near the mass boundary for fully convective stars (M~0.35 Msun), whose parameters appear to be in agreement with low-mass stellar model.
  • We present results from the first observations of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Panchromatic Comparative Exoplanet Treasury (PanCET) program for WASP-101b, a highly inflated hot Jupiter and one of the community targets proposed for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Early Release Science (ERS) program. From a single HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observation, we find that the near-infrared transmission spectrum of WASP-101b contains no significant H$_2$O absorption features and we rule out a clear atmosphere at 13{\sigma}. Therefore, WASP-101b is not an optimum target for a JWST ERS program aimed at observing strong molecular transmission features. We compare WASP-101b to the well studied and nearly identical hot Jupiter WASP-31b. These twin planets show similar temperature-pressure profiles and atmospheric features in the near-infrared. We suggest exoplanets in the same parameter space as WASP-101b and WASP-31b will also exhibit cloudy transmission spectral features. For future HST exoplanet studies, our analysis also suggests that a lower count limit needs to be exceeded per pixel on the detector in order to avoid unwanted instrumental systematics.
  • During primary transits, the spectral signatures of an exoplanet atmosphere can be measured using transmission spectroscopy. The goal of this work is to accurately measure the atomspheric sodium absorption light curve in HD189733b, correcting for the effects of stellar differential limb-darkening, stellar activity and a "bump" caused by the changing radial velocity of the exoplanet. In fact, due to the high cadence and quality of our data, it is the first time that the last feature can be detected even by visual inspection. We use 244 high-resolution optical spectra taken by the UVES instrument mounted at the VLT. Our observations cover a full transit of HD 189733b, with a cadence of 45 seconds. To probe the transmission spectrum of sodium we produce excess light- curves integrating the stellar flux in passbands of 1 \AA, 1.5 \AA, and 3 \AA inside the core of each sodium D-line. We model the effects of external sources on the excess light-curves, which correspond to an observed stellar flare beginning close to mid-transit time and the wavelength dependent limb-darkening effects. In addition, by characterizing the effect of the changing radial velocity and Doppler shifts of the planetary sodium lines inside the stellar sodium lines, we estimate the depth and width of the exoplanetary sodium feature. We estimate the shape of the planetary sodium line by a Gaussian profile, with an equivalent width of 0.0023 \pm 0.0010 \AA, thereby confirming the presence of sodium in the atmosphere of HD189733b with excess absorption levels of 0.72 \pm 0.25%, 0.34 \pm 0.11%, and 0.20 \pm 0.06% for the integration bands of 1 \AA, 1.5 \AA, and 3 \AA, respectively. From these, we produce a first order estimate of the number density of sodium in the exoplanet atmosphere.
  • We report the discovery of eight new giant planets, and updated orbits for four known planets, orbiting dwarf and subgiant stars using the CORALIE, HARPS, and MIKE instruments as part of the Calan-Hertfordshire Extrasolar Planet Search. The planets have masses in the range 1.1-5.4MJs, orbital periods from 40-2900 days, and eccentricities from 0.0-0.6. They include a double-planet system orbiting the most massive star in our sample (HD147873), two eccentric giant planets (HD128356b and HD154672b), and a rare 14 Herculis analogue (HD224538b). We highlight some population correlations from the sample of radial velocity detected planets orbiting nearby stars, including the mass function exponential distribution, confirmation of the growing body of evidence that low-mass planets tend to be found orbiting more metal-poor stars than giant planets, and a possible period-metallicity correlation for planets with masses >0.1MJ, based on a metallicity difference of 0.16 dex between the population of planets with orbital periods less than 100 days and those with orbital periods greater than 100 days.
  • In the context of the TraMoS project we present nine new transit observations of the exoplanet OGLE-TR-113b observed with the Gemini South, Magellan Baade, Danish-1.54m and SOAR telescopes. We perform a homogeneous analysis of these new transits together with ten literature transits to probe into the potential detection of an orbital decay for this planet reported by \citet{adams2010}. Our new observations extend the transit monitoring baseline for this system by 6 years, to a total of more than 13 years. With our timing analysis we obtained a $\dot{P}=-1.0 \pm 6.0$ ms~yr$^{-1}$, which rejects previous hints of a larger orbital decay for OGLE-TR-113b. With our updated value of $\dot{P}$ we can discard tidal quality factors of $Q_{\star} < 10^{5}$ for its host star. Additionally, we calculate a 1$\sigma$ dispersion of the Transit Timing Variations (TTVs) of 42 seconds over the 13 years baseline, which discards additional planets in the system more massive than $0.5-3.0~M_{\oplus}$ in 1:2, 5:3, 2:1 and 3:1 Mean Motion Resonances with OGLE-TR-113b. Finally, with the joint analysis of the 19 light curves we update transit parameters, such as the relative semi-major axis $a / R_s = 6.44^{+0.04}_{-0.05}$, the planet-to-star radius ratio $R_p / R_s =0.14436^{+0.00096}_{-0.00088}$, and constrains its orbital inclination to $i =89.27^{+0.51}_{-0.68}$~degrees.
  • We present here the detection of a system of four low-mass planets around the bright (V=5.5) and close-by (6.5 pc) star HD219134. This is the first result of the Rocky Planet Search program with HARPS-N on the TNG in La Palma. The inner planet orbits the star in 3.0937 +/-0.0004 days, on a quasi-circular orbit with a semi-major axis of 0.0382 +/- 0.0003 AU. Spitzer observations allowed us to detect the transit of the planet in front of the star making HD219134b the nearest known transiting planet to date. From the amplitude of the radial-velocity variation (2.33 +/- 0.24 m/s) and observed depth of the transit (359 +/- 38 ppm), the planet mass and radius are estimated to be 4.46 +/- 0.47 M_{\oplus} and 1.606 +/- 0.086 R_{\oplus} leading to a mean density of 5.89 +/- 1.17 g/cc, suggesting a rocky composition. One additional planet with minimum mass of 2.67 +/- 0.59 M_{\oplus} moves on a close-in, quasi-circular orbit with a period of 6.765 +/- 0.005 days. The third planet in the system has a period of 46.78 +/- 0.16 days and a minimum mass of 8.7 +/- 1.1 M{\oplus}, at 0.234 +/- 0.002 AU from the star. Its eccentricity is 0.32 +/- 0.14. The period of this planet is close to the rotational period of the star estimated from variations of activity indicators (42.3 +/- 0.1 days). The planetary origin of the signal is, however, the preferred solution as no indication of variation at the corresponding frequency is observed for activity-sensitive parameters. Finally, a fourth additional longer-period planet of mass of 62 +/- 6 M_{\oplus} orbits the star in 1190 days, on an eccentric orbit (e=0.27 +/- 0.11) at a distance of 2.14 +/- 0.27 AU.
  • We present the detection of potassium in the atmosphere of HAT-P-1b using optical transit narrowband photometry. The results are obtained using the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) together with the OSIRIS instrument in tunable filter imaging mode. We observed four transits, two at continuum wavelengths outside the potassium feature, at 6792 {\AA} and 8844 {\AA}, and two probing the potassium feature in the line wing at 7582.0 {\AA} and the line core at 7664.9 {\AA} using a 12 {\AA} filter width (R~650). The planet-to-star radius ratios in the continuum are found to be $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1176 $\pm$ 0.0013 at 6792 {\AA} and $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1168 $\pm$ 0.0022 at 8844 {\AA}, significantly lower than the two observations in the potassium line: $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1248 $\pm$ 0.0014 in the line wing at 7582.0 {\AA} and $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1268 $\pm$ 0.0012 in the line core at 7664.9 {\AA}. With a weighted mean of the observations outside the potassium feature $R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.1174 $\pm$ 0.0010, the potassium is detected as an increase in the radius ratio of {\Delta}$R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.0073 $\pm$ 0.0017 at 7582.0 {\AA} and {\Delta}$R_{\rm{pl}}/R_{\star}$ = 0.0094 $\pm$ 0.0016 at 7664.9 {\AA} (a significance of 4.3 and 6.1 $\sigma$ respectively). We hypothesise that the strong detection of potassium is caused by a large scale height, which can be explained by a high-temperature at the base of the upper atmosphere. A lower mean molecular mass caused by the dissociation of molecular hydrogen into atomic hydrogen by the EUV flux from the host star may also partly explain the amplitude of our detection.
  • [Abridged] We have only been able to comprehensively characterize the atmospheres of a handful of transiting planets, because most orbit faint stars. TESS will discover transiting planets orbiting the brightest stars, enabling, in principle, an atmospheric survey of 10^2 to 10^3 bright hot Jupiters and warm sub-Neptunes. Uniform observations of such a statistically significant sample would provide leverage to understand---and learn from---the diversity of short-period planets. We argue that the best way to maximize the scientific returns of TESS is with a follow-up space mission consisting of a ~1 m telescope with an optical--NIR spectrograph: it could measure molecular absorption for non-terrestrial planets, as well as eclipses and phase variations for the hottest jovians. Such a mission could observe up to 10^3 transits per year, thus enabling it to survey a large fraction of the bright (J<11) TESS planets. JWST could be used to perform detailed atmospheric characterization of the most interesting transiting targets (transit, eclipse, and---when possible---phase-resolved spectroscopy). TESS is also expected to discover a few temperate terrestrial planets transiting nearby M-Dwarfs. Characterizing these worlds will be time-intensive: JWST will need months to provide tantalizing constraints on the presence of an atmosphere, planetary rotational state, clouds, and greenhouse gases. Future flagship missions should be designed to provide better constraints on the habitability of M-Dwarf temperate terrestrial planets.
  • We report the first ground-based detections of the shallow transit of the super-Earth exoplanet 55 Cnc e using a 2-meter-class telescope. Using differential spectrophotometry, we observed one transit in 2013 and another in 2014, with average spectral resolutions of ~700 and ~250, spanning the Johnson BVR photometric bands. We find a white-light planet-to-star radius ratio of 0.0190 -0.0027+0.0023 from the 2013 observations and 0.0200 -0.0018+0.0017 from the 2014 observations. The two datasets combined results in a radius ratio of 0.0198 -0.0014+0.0013. These values are all in agreement with previous space-based results. Scintillation noise in the data prevents us from placing strong constraints on the presence of an extended hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Nevertheless, our detections of 55 Cnc e in transit demonstrate that moderate-size telescopes on the ground will be capable of routine follow-up observations of super-Earth candidates discovered by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) around bright stars. We expect it will be also possible to place constraints on the atmospheric characteristics of those planets by devising observational strategies to minimize scintillation noise.
  • We report on the characterization of the Kepler-101 planetary system, thanks to a combined DE-MCMC analysis of Kepler data and forty radial velocities obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph. This system was previously validated by Rowe et al. (2014) and is composed of a hot super-Neptune, Kepler-101b, and an Earth-sized planet, Kepler-101c. These two planets orbit the slightly evolved and metal-rich G-type star in 3.49 and 6.03 days, respectively. With mass $M_{\rm p}=51.1_{-4.7}^{+5.1}~M_{\oplus}$, radius $R_{\rm p}=5.77_{-0.79}^{+0.85}~R_{\oplus}$, and density $\rho_{\rm p}=1.45_{-0.48}^{+0.83} \rm g\;cm^{-3}$, Kepler-101b is the first fully-characterized super-Neptune, and its density suggests that heavy elements make up a significant fraction of its interior; more than $60\%$ of its total mass. Kepler-101c has a radius of $1.25_{-0.17}^{+0.19}~R_{\oplus}$, which implies the absence of any H/He envelope, but its mass could not be determined due to the relative faintness of the parent star for highly precise radial-velocity measurements ($K_{\rm p}=13.8$) and the limited number of radial velocities. The $1~\sigma$ upper limit, $M_{\rm p} < 3.8~M_{\oplus}$, excludes a pure iron composition with a $68.3\%$ probability. The architecture of the Kepler-101 planetary system - containing a close-in giant planet and an outer Earth-sized planet with a period ratio slightly larger than the 3:2 resonance - is certainly of interest for planet formation and evolution scenarios. This system does not follow the trend, seen by Ciardi et al. (2013), that in the majority of Kepler systems of planet pairs with at least one Neptune-size or larger planet, the larger planet has the longer period.
  • In this paper, we derive the fundamental properties of 1SWASPJ011351.29+314909.7 (J0113+31), a metal-poor (-0.40 +/- 0.04 dex), eclipsing binary in an eccentric orbit (~0.3) with an orbital period of ~14.277 d. Eclipsing M dwarfs orbiting solar-type stars (EBLMs), like J0113+31, have been identified from WASP light curves and follow-up spectroscopy in the course of the transiting planet search. We present the first binary of the EBLM sample to be fully analysed, and thus, define here the methodology. The primary component with a mass of 0.945 +/- 0.045 Msun has a large radius (1.378 +/- 0.058 Rsun) indicating that the system is quite old, ~9.5 Gyr. The M-dwarf secondary mass of 0.186 +/- 0.010 Msun and radius of 0.209 +/- 0.011 Rsun are fully consistent with stellar evolutionary models. However, from the near-infrared secondary eclipse light curve, the M dwarf is found to have an effective temperature of 3922 +/- 42 K, which is ~600 K hotter than predicted by theoretical models. We discuss different scenarios to explain this temperature discrepancy. The case of J0113+31 for which we can measure mass, radius, temperature and metallicity, highlights the importance of deriving mass, radius and temperature as a function of metallicity for M dwarfs to better understand the lowest mass stars. The EBLM Project will define the relationship between mass, radius, temperature and metallicity for M dwarfs providing important empirical constraints at the bottom of the main sequence.
  • We present narrow-band photometric measurements of the exoplanet GJ 1214b using the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) and the OSIRIS instrument. Using tuneable filters we observed a total of five transits, three of which were observed at two wavelengths nearly simultaneously, producing a total of eight individual light curves, six of these probed the possible existence of a methane absorption feature in the 8770 - 8850 {\AA} region at high resolution. We detect no increase in the planet-to-star radius ratio across the methane feature with a change in radius ratio of $\Delta$R = -0.0007 $\pm$ 0.0017 corresponding to a scale height (H) change of -0.5 $\pm$ 1.2 H across the methane feature, assuming a hydrogen dominated atmosphere. We find a variety of water and cloudy atmospheric models fit the data well, but find that cloud-free models provide poor fits. These observations support a flat transmission spectrum resulting from the presence of a high-altitude haze or a water-rich atmosphere, in agreement with previous studies. In this study the observations are predominantly limited by the photometric quality and the limited number of data points (resulting from a long observing cadence), which make the determination of the systematic noise challenging. With tuneable filters capable of high resolution measurements (R ~ 600 - 750) of narrow absorption features, the interpretation of our results are also limited by the absence of high resolution methane models below 1 $\mu$m.
  • We report twelve new transit observations of the exoplanet WASP-4b from the Transit Monitoring in the South Project (TraMoS) project. These transits are combined with all previously published transit data for this planet to provide an improved radius measurement of Rp = 1.395 +- 0.022 Rjup and improved transit ephemerides. In a new homogeneous analysis in search for Transit Timing Variations (TTVs) we find no evidence of those with RMS amplitudes larger than 20 seconds over a 4-year time span. This lack of TTVs rules out the presence of additional planets in the system with masses larger than about 2.5 M_earth, 2.0 M_earth, and 1.0 M_earth around the 1:2, 5:3 and 2:1 orbital resonances. Our search for the variation of other parameters, such as orbital inclination and transit depth also yields negative results over the total time span of the transit observations. Finally we perform a simple study of stellar spots configurations of the system and conclude that the star rotational period is about 34 days.
  • We present two transits of the hot-Jupiter exoplanet XO-2b using the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The time series observations were performed using long-slit spectroscopy of XO-2 and a nearby reference star with the OSIRIS instrument, enabling differential specrophotometric transit lightcurves capable of measuring the exoplanet's transmission spectrum. Two optical low-resolution grisms were used to cover the optical wavelength range from 3800 to 9300{\AA}. We find that sub-mmag level slit losses between the target and reference star prevent full optical transmission spectra from being constructed, limiting our analysis to differential absorption depths over ~1000{\AA} regions. Wider long slits or multi-object grism spectroscopy with wide masks will likely prove effective in minimising the observed slit-loss trends. During both transits, we detect significant absorption in the planetary atmosphere of XO-2b using a 50{\AA} bandpass centred on the Na I doublet, with absorption depths of Delta(R_pl/R_star)^2=0.049+/-0.017 % using the R500R grism and 0.047+/-0.011 % using the R500B grism (combined 5.2-sigma significance from both transits). The sodium feature is unresolved in our low-resolution spectra, with detailed modelling also likely ruling out significant line-wing absorption over an ~800{\AA} region surrounding the doublet. Combined with narrowband photometric measurements, XO-2b is the first hot Jupiter with evidence for both sodium and potassium present in the planet's atmosphere.
  • Single metal polluted white dwarfs with no dusty disks are believed to be actively accreting metals from a circumstellar disk of gas caused by the destruction of asteroids perturbed by planetary systems. We report, for the first time, the detection of circumstellar Ca~II gas in absorption around the DAZ WD~1124-293, which lacks an infrared excess. We constrain the gas to $>$7 $R_{\rm WD}$ and $<$32000~AU, and estimate it to be at $\sim$54~R$_{\rm WD}$, well within WD~1124-293's tidal disruption radius. This detection is based on several epochs of spectroscopy around the Ca~II H and K lines ($\lambda$=3968\AA, 3933\AA) with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan/Clay Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We confirm the circumstellar nature of the gas by observing nearby sightlines and finding no evidence for gas from the local interstellar medium. Through archival data we have measured the equivalent width of the two photospheric Ca lines over a period of 11 years. We see $<$ 5-7\% epoch-to-epoch variation in equivalent widths over this time period, and no evidence for long term trends. The presence of a circumstellar gas implies a near edge-on inclination to the system, thus we place limits to short period transiting planetary companions with R $>$ R$_{\rm \oplus}$ using the WASP survey. The presence of gas in orbit around WD~1124-293 implies that most DAZs could harbor planetary systems. Since 25-30\% of white dwarfs show metal line absorption, the dynamical process for perturbing small bodies must be robust.
  • We have analyzed Kepler light curves for 849 stars with T_eff < 5200 K from our Cycle 1 Guest Observer program. We identify six new eclipsing binaries, one of which has an orbital period of 29.91 d, and two of which are probably W UMa variables. In addition, we identify a candidate "warm Jupiter" exoplanet. We further examine a subset of 670 sources for variability. Of these objects, 265 stars clearly show periodic variability that we assign to rotation of the low-mass star. At the photometric precision level provided by Kepler, 251 of our objects showed no evidence for variability. We were unable to determine periods for 154 variable objects. We find that 79% of stars with T_eff < 5200 K are variable. The rotation periods we derive for the periodic variables span the range 0.31 < P_rot < 126.5 d. A considerable number of stars with rotation periods similar to the solar value show activity levels that are 100 times higher than the Sun. This is consistent with results for solar-like field stars. As has been found in previous studies, stars with shorter rotation periods generally exhibit larger modulations. This trend flattens beyond P_rot = 25 d, demonstrating that even long period binaries may still have components with high levels of activity and investigating whether the masses and radii of the stellar components in these systems are consistent with stellar models could remain problematic. Surprisingly, our modeling of the light curves suggests that the active regions on these cool stars are either preferentially located near the rotational poles, or that there are two spot groups located at lower latitudes, but in opposing hemispheres.
  • Although OGLE-TR-56b was the second transiting exoplanet discovered, only one light curve, observed in 2006, has been published besides the discovery data. We present twenty-one light curves of nineteen different transits observed between July 2003 and July 2009 with the Magellan Telescopes and Gemini South. The combined analysis of the new light curves confirms a slightly inflated planetary radius relative to model predictions, with R_p = 1.378 +/- 0.090 R_J. However, the values found for the transit duration, semimajor axis, and inclination values differ significantly from the previous result, likely due to systematic errors. The new semimajor axis and inclination, a = 0.01942 +/- 0.00015 AU and i = 73.72 +/- 0.18 degrees, are smaller than previously reported, while the total duration, T_14 = 7931 +/- 38 s, is 18 minutes longer. The transit midtimes have errors from 23 s to several minutes, and no evidence is seen for transit midtime or duration variations. Similarly, no change is seen in the orbital period, implying a nominal stellar tidal decay factor of Q_* = 10^7, with a three-sigma lower limit of 10^5.7.
  • We present Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) optical transit narrow-band photometry of the hot-Jupiter exoplanet XO-2b using the OSIRIS instrument. This unique instrument has the capabilities to deliver high cadence narrow-band photometric lightcurves, allowing us to probe the atmospheric composition of hot Jupiters from the ground. The observations were taken during three transit events which cover four wavelengths at spectral resolutions near 500, necessary for observing atmospheric features, and have near-photon limited sub-mmag precisions. Precision narrow-band photometry on a large aperture telescope allows for atmospheric transmission spectral features to be observed for exoplanets around much fainter stars than those of the well studied targets HD209458b and HD189733b, providing access to the majority of known transiting planets. For XO-2b, we measure planet-to-star radius contrasts of R_pl/R_star=0.10508+/-0.00052 at 6792 Ang, 0.10640+/-0.00058 at 7582 Ang, and 0.10686+/-0.00060 at 7664.9 Ang, and 0.10362+/-0.00051 at 8839 Ang. These measurements reveal significant spectral features at two wavelengths, with an absorption level of 0.067+/-0.016% at 7664.9 Ang due to atmospheric potassium in the line core (a 4.1-sigma significance level), and an absorption level of 0.058+/-0.016% at 7582 Ang, (a 3.6-sigma significance level). When comparing our measurements to hot-Jupiter atmospheric models, we find good agreement with models which are dominated in the optical by alkali metals. This is the first evidence for potassium in an extrasolar planet, an element that has long been theorized along with sodium to be a dominant source of opacity at optical wavelengths for hot Jupiters.
  • We identify 231 objects in the newly released Cycle 0 dataset from the Kepler Mission as double-eclipse, detached eclipsing binary systems with Teff < 5500 K and orbital periods shorter than ~32 days. We model each light curve using the JKTEBOP code with a genetic algorithm to obtain precise values for each system. We identify 95 new systems with both components below 1.0 M_sun and eclipses of at least 0.1 magnitudes, suitable for ground-based follow-up. Of these, 14 have periods less than 1.0 day, 52 have periods between 1.0 and 10.0 days, and 29 have periods greater than 10.0 days. This new sample of main-sequence, low-mass, double-eclipse, detached eclipsing binary candidates more than doubles the number of previously known systems, and extends the sample into the completely heretofore unexplored P > 10.0 day period regime. We find preliminary evidence from these systems that the radii of low-mass stars in binary systems decrease with period. This supports the theory that binary spin-up is the primary cause of inflated radii in low-mass binary systems, although a full analysis of each system with radial-velocity and multi-color light curves is needed to fully explore this hypothesis. As well, we present 7 new transiting planet candidates that do not appear among the recently released list of 706 candidates by the Kepler team, nor in the Kepler False Positive Catalog, along with several other new and interesting systems. We also present novel techniques for the identification, period analysis, and modeling of eclipsing binaries.
  • We present measurements of fundamental astrophysical properties of nearby, low-mass, K- and M-dwarfs from our DISCOS survey (DIameterS of COol Stars). The principal goal of our study is the determination of linear radii and effective temperatures for these stars. We calculate their radii from angular diameter measurements using the CHARA Array and Hipparcos distances. Combined with bolometric flux measurements based on literature photometry, we use our angular diameter results to calculate their effective surface temperatures. We present preliminary results established on an assortment of empirical relations to the stellar effective temperature and radius that are based upon these measurements. We elaborate on the discrepancy seen between theoretical and observed stellar radii, previously claimed to be related to stellar activity and/or metallicity. Our preliminary conclusion, however, is that convection plays a larger role in the determination of radii of these late-type stars. Understanding the source of the radius disagreement is likely to impact other areas of study for low-mass stars, such as the detection and characterization of extrasolar planets in the habitable zones.
  • We present six new transits of the hot Jupiter OGLE-TR-113b observed with MagIC on the Magellan Telescopes between January 2007 and May 2009. We update the system parameters and revise the planetary radius to R_p=1.084 pm 0.029 R_J, where the error is dominated by stellar radius uncertainties. The new transit midtimes reveal no transit timing variations from a constant ephemeris of greater than 13 pm 28 seconds over two years, placing an upper limit of 1-2 M_Earth on the mass of any perturber in a 1:2 or 2:1 mean-motion resonance with OGLE-TR-113b. Combining the new transit epochs with five epochs published between 2002 and 2006, we find hints that the orbital period of the planet may not be constant, with the best fit indicating a decrease of dP/dt=-60 pm 15 milliseconds per year. If real, this change in period could result from either a long-period (more than 8 years) timing variation due to a massive external perturber, or more intriguingly from the orbital decay of the planet. The detection of a changing period is still tentative and requires additional observations, but if confirmed it would enable direct tests of tidal stability and dynamical models of close-in planets.
  • We present six new transits of the exoplanet OGLE-TR-111b observed with the Magellan Telescopes in Chile between April 2008 and March 2009. We combine these new transits with five previously published transit epochs for this planet between 2005 and 2006 to extend the analysis of transit timing variations reported for this system. We derive a new planetary radius value of 1.019 +/- 0.026 R_J, which is intermediate to the previously reported radii of 1.067 +/- 0.054 R_J (Winn et al. 2007) and 0.922 +/- 0.057 R_J (Diaz et al. 2008). We also examine the transit timing variation and duration change claims of Diaz et al. (2008). Our analysis of all eleven transit epochs does not reveal any points with deviations larger than 2 sigma, and most points are well within 1 sigma. Although the transit duration nominally decreases over the four year span of the data, systematic errors in the photometry can account for this result. Therefore, there is no compelling evidence for either a timing or a duration variation in this system. Numerical integrations place an upper limit of about 1 M_E on the mass of a potential second planet in a 2:1 mean-motion resonance with OGLE-TR-111b.