• We present the results of 45 transit observations obtained for the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-32b. The transits have been observed using several telescopes mainly throughout the YETI network. In 25 cases, complete transit light curves with a timing precision better than $1.4\:$min have been obtained. These light curves have been used to refine the system properties, namely inclination $i$, planet-to-star radius ratio $R_\textrm{p}/R_\textrm{s}$, and the ratio between the semimajor axis and the stellar radius $a/R_\textrm{s}$. First analyses by Hartman et al. (2011) suggest the existence of a second planet in the system, thus we tried to find an additional body using the transit timing variation (TTV) technique. Taking also literature data points into account, we can explain all mid-transit times by refining the linear ephemeris by 21ms. Thus we can exclude TTV amplitudes of more than $\sim1.5$min.
  • The transiting planet WASP-12 b was identified as a potential target for transit timing studies because a departure from a linear ephemeris was reported in the literature. Such deviations could be caused by an additional planet in the system. We attempt to confirm the existence of claimed variations in transit timing and interpret its origin. We organised a multi-site campaign to observe transits by WASP-12 b in three observing seasons, using 0.5-2.6-metre telescopes. We obtained 61 transit light curves, many of them with sub-millimagnitude precision. The simultaneous analysis of the best-quality datasets allowed us to obtain refined system parameters, which agree with values reported in previous studies. The residuals versus a linear ephemeris reveal a possible periodic signal that may be approximated by a sinusoid with an amplitude of 0.00068+/-0.00013 d and period of 500+/-20 orbital periods of WASP-12 b. The joint analysis of timing data and published radial velocity measurements results in a two-planet model which better explains observations than single-planet scenarios. We hypothesize that WASP-12 b might be not the only planet in the system and there might be the additional 0.1 M_Jup body on a 3.6-d eccentric orbit. A dynamical analysis indicates that the proposed two-planet system is stable over long timescales.
  • We present a multi-wavelength (X-ray, $\gamma$-ray, optical and radio) study of HD 194816, a late O-type X-ray detected spectroscopic binary. X-ray spectra are analyzed and the X-ray photon arrival times are checked for pulsation. In addition, newly obtained optical spectroscopic monitoring data on HD 164816 are presented. They are complemented by available radio data from several large scale surveys as well as the \emph{FERMI} $\gamma$-ray data from its \emph{Large Area Telescope}. We report the detection of a low energy excess in the X-ray spectrum that can be described by a simple absorbed blackbody model with a temperature of $\sim$ 50 eV as well as a 9.78 s pulsation of the X-ray source. The soft X-ray excess, the X-ray pulsation, and the kinematical age would all be consistent with a compact object like a neutron star as companion to HD 164816. The size of the soft X-ray excess emitting area is consistent with a circular region with a radius of about 7 km, typical for neutron stars, while the emission measure of the remaining harder emission is typical for late O-type single or binary stars. If HD 164816 includes a neutron star born in a supernova, this supernova should have been very recent and should have given the system a kick, which is consistent with the observation that the star HD 164816 has a significantly different radial velocity than the cluster mean. In addition we confirm the binarity of HD 164816 itself by obtaining an orbital period of 3.82 d, projected masses $m_1 {\rm sin}^{3} i$ = 2.355(69) M$_\odot$, $m_2 {\rm sin}^{3} i$ = 2.103(62) M$_\odot$ apparently seen at low inclination angle, determined from high-resolution optical spectra.
  • GM Cep in the young (~4 Myr) open cluster Trumpler 37 has been known to be an abrupt variable and to have a circumstellar disk with very active accretion. Our monitoring observations in 2009-2011 revealed the star to show sporadic flare events, each with brightening of < 0.5 mag lasting for days. These brightening events, associated with a color change toward the blue, should originate from an increased accretion activity. Moreover, the star also underwent a brightness drop of ~1 mag lasting for about a month, during which the star became bluer when fainter. Such brightness drops seem to have a recurrence time scale of a year, as evidenced in our data and the photometric behavior of GM Cep over a century. Between consecutive drops, the star brightened gradually by about 1 mag and became blue at peak luminosity. We propose that the drop is caused by obscuration of the central star by an orbiting dust concentration. The UX Orionis type of activity in GM Cep therefore exemplifies the disk inhomogeneity process in transition between grain coagulation and planetesimal formation in a young circumstellar disk.
  • Recently, 60Fe was found in the Earth crust formed in a nearby recent supernova (SN). If the distance to the SN and mass of the progenitor of that SN was known, then one could constrain SN models. Knowing the positions, proper motions, and distances of dozens of young nearby neutron stars, we can determine their past flight paths and possible kinematic origin. Once the birth place of a neutron star in a SN is found, we would have determined the distance of the SN and the mass of the SN progenitor star.
  • We try to constrain the Equation-of-State (EoS) of supra-nuclear-density matter in neutron stars (NSs) by observations of nearby NSs. There are seven thermally emitting NSs known from X-ray and optical observations, the so-called Magnificent Seven (M7), which are young (up to few Myrs), nearby (within a few hundred pc), and radio-quiet with blackbody-like X-ray spectra, so that we can observe their surfaces. As bright X-ray sources, we can determine their rotational (pulse) period and their period derivative from X-ray timing. From XMM and/or Chandra X-ray spectra, we can determine their temperature. With precise astrometric observations using the Hubble Space Telescope, we can determine their parallax (i.e. distance) and optical flux. From flux, distance, and temperature, one can derive the emitting area - with assumptions about the atmosphere and/or temperature distribution on the surface. This was recently done by us for the two brightest M7 NSs RXJ1856 and RXJ0720. Then, from identifying absorption lines in X-ray spectra, one can also try to determine gravitational redshift. Also, from rotational phase-resolved spectroscopy, we have for the first time determined the compactness (mass/radius) of the M7 NS RBS1223. If also applied to RXJ1856, radius (from luminosity and temperature) and compactness (from X-ray data) will yield the mass and radius - for the first time for an isolated single neutron star. We will present our observations and recent results.
  • We present a new flare star, which was discovered during our survey on a selected field at the edge of the Pleiades cluster. The field was observed in the period 2007 - 2010 with three different CCD-cameras at the University Observatory Jena with telescopes from 25 to 90 cm. The flare duration is almost one hour with an amplitude in the R-band of about 1.08 mag. The location of the flare star in a color-magnitude diagram is consistent with age and distance of the Pleiades. In the optical PSF of the flare star there are two 2MASS objects (unresolved in most images in the optical Jena PSF), so it is not yet known which one of them is responsible for this flare. The BVRIJHK colors yield spectral types of M1 and M2 with extinction being A_V=0.231+/-0.024 mag and A_V=0.266+/-0.020 for those two stars, consistent with the Pleiades cluster.
  • We have performed deep, wide-field imaging on a ~0.4 deg^2 field in the Pleiades (Melotte 22). The selected field was not yet target of a deep search for low mass stars and brown dwarfs. Our limiting magnitudes are R ~ 22mag and I ~ 20mag, sufficient to detect brown dwarf candidates down to 40MJ. We found 197 objects, whose location in the (I, R - I) color magnitude diagram is consistent with the age and the distance of the Pleiades. Using CTK R and I as well as JHK photometry from our data and the 2MASS survey we were able to identify 7 new brown dwarf candidates. We present our data reduction technique, which enables us to resample, calibrate, and co-add many images by just two steps. We estimate the interstellar extinction and the spectral type from our optical and the NIR data using a two-dimensional chi^22 fitting.
  • We present follow-up observations of comet 17/P Holmes after its extreme outburst in brightness, which occurred end of October 2007. We obtained 58 V-band images of the comet between October 2007 and February 2008, using the Cassegrain-Teleskop-Kamera (CTK) at the University Observatory Jena. We present precise astrometry of the comet, which yields its most recent Keplerian orbital elements. Furthermore, we show that the comet's coma expands quite linearly with a velocity of about 1650km/s between October and December 2007. The photometric monitoring of comet 17/P Holmes shows that its photometric activity level decreased by about 5.9mag within 105 days after its outburst.