• Red supergiants have been confirmed as the progenitor stars of the majority of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. However, while such stars are observed with masses >25M$_\odot$, detections of >18M$_\odot$ progenitors remain elusive. Red supergiants are also expected to form at all metallicities, but discoveries of explosions from low-metallicity progenitors are scarce. Here, we report observations of the type II supernova, SN 2015bs, for which we infer a progenitor metallicity of $\leq$0.1Z$_\odot$ from comparison to photospheric-phase spectral models, and a Zero Age Main-Sequence mass of 17-25M$_\odot$ through comparison to nebular-phase spectral models. SN 2015bs displays a normal 'plateau' light-curve morphology, and typical spectral properties, implying a red supergiant progenitor. This is the first example of such a high mass progenitor for a 'normal' type II supernova, suggesting a link between high mass red supergiant explosions and low-metallicity progenitors.
  • As the closest Type Ia supernova in decades, SN 2014J provides a unique opportunity for detailed investigation into observational signatures of the progenitor system and explosion mechanism in addition to burning product distribution. We present a late-time near-infrared spectral series from Gemini-N at $307-466$ days after the explosion. Following the $H$-band evolution probes the distribution of radioactive iron group elements, the extent of mixing, and presence of magnetic fields in the expanding ejecta. Comparing the isolated $1.6440$ $\mu$m [Fe II] emission line with synthetic models shows consistency with a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf of $\rho_c=0.7\times10^9$ g cm${}^{-3}$ undergoing a delayed detonation. The ratio of the flux in the neighboring $1.54$ $\mu$m emission feature to the flux in the $1.6440$ $\mu$m feature shows evidence of some limited mixing of stable and radioactive iron group elements in the central regions. Additionally, the evolution of the $1.6440$ $\mu$m line shows an intriguing asymmetry. When measuring line-width of this feature, the data show an increase in line width not seen in the evolution of the synthetic spectra, corresponding to $\approx1{,}000$ km s${}^{-1}$, which could be caused by a localized transition to detonation producing asymmetric ionization in the ejecta. Using the difference in width between the different epochs, an asymmetric component in the central regions, corresponding to approximately the inner $2\times10^{-4}$ of white dwarf mass suggests an off-center ignition of the initial explosion and hence of the kinematic center from the chemical center. Several additional models investigated, including a He detonation and a merger, have difficulty reproducing the features seen these spectra.
  • We present nebular-phase spectra of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2016brx, a member of the 1991bg-like subclass that lies at the faint end of the SN Ia luminosity function. Nebular spectra are available for only three other 1991bg-like SNe, and their Co line centers are all within <~ 500 km/s of each other. In contrast, the nebular Co line center of SN 2016brx is blue-shifted by >1500 km/s compared to them and by ~1200 km/s compared to the rest frame. This is a significant shift relative to the narrow nebular line velocity dispersion of <~ 2000 km/s of these SNe. The large range of nebular line shifts implies that the Ni56 in the ejecta of SN 1991bg-like events is off-center by ~1000 km/s rather than universally centrally confined as previously suggested. With the addition of SN 2016brx, the Co nebular line shapes of 1991bg-like objects appear to connect with the brighter SNe Ia that show double-peak profiles, hinting at a continuous distribution of line profiles among SNe Ia. One class of models to produce both off-center and bi-modal Ni56 distributions is collisions of white dwarfs with unequal and equal masses.
  • We present detailed ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared light curves of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2012fr, which exploded in the Fornax cluster member NGC 1365. These precise high-cadence light curves provide a dense coverage of the flux evolution from $-$12 to $+$140 days with respect to the epoch of $B$-band maximum (\tmax). Supplementary imaging at the earliest epochs reveals an initial slow, nearly linear rise in luminosity with a duration of $\sim$2.5 days, followed by a faster rising phase that is well reproduced by an explosion model with a moderate amount of $^{56}$Ni mixing in the ejecta. From an analysis of the light curves, we conclude: $(i)$ explosion occurred $< 22$ hours before the first detection of the supernova, $(ii)$ the rise time to peak bolometric ($\lambda > 1800 $\AA) luminosity was $16.5 \pm 0.6$ days, $(iii)$ the supernova suffered little or no host-galaxy dust reddening, $(iv)$ the peak luminosity in both the optical and near-infrared was consistent with the bright end of normal Type Ia diversity, and $(v)$ $0.60 \pm 0.15 M_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni was synthesized in the explosion. Despite its normal luminosity, SN 2012fr displayed unusually prevalent high-velocity \ion{Ca}{2} and \ion{Si}{2} absorption features, and a nearly constant photospheric velocity of the \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 line at $\sim$12,000 \kms\ beginning $\sim$5 days before \tmax. Other peculiarities in the early phase photometry and the spectral evolution are highlighted. SN 2012fr also adds to a growing number of Type Ia supernovae hosted by galaxies with direct Cepheid distance measurements.
  • Radiative transfer models of two transitional type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) have been produced using the abundance stratification technique. These two objects --designated SN 2007on and SN 2011iv-- both exploded in the same galaxy, NGC 1404, which allows for a direct comparison. SN 2007on synthesised 0.25 $M_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni and was less luminous than SN 2011iv, which produced 0.31 $M_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni. SN 2007on had a lower central density ($\rho_{c}$) and higher explosion energy ($E_{\rm kin}$ $\sim 1.3\pm$0.3$\times10^{51}$erg) than SN 2011iv, and it produced less nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) elements (0.06 $M_{\odot}$). Whereas, SN 2011iv had a larger $\rho_{c}$, which increased the electron capture rate in the lowest velocity regions, and produced 0.35 $M_{\odot}$ of stable NSE elements. SN 2011iv had an explosion energy of $E_{\rm kin}$ $\sim 0.9 \pm$0.2$\times10^{51}$erg. Both objects had an ejecta mass consistent with the Chandrasekhar mass (Ch-mass), and their observational properties are well described by predictions from delayed-detonation explosion models. Within this framework, comparison to the sub-luminous SN 1986G indicates SN 2011iv and SN 1986G have different transition densities ($\rho_{tr}$) but similar $\rho_{c}$. Whereas, SN 1986G and SN 2007on had a similar $\rho_{tr}$ but different $\rho_{c}$. Finally, we examine the colour-stretch parameter $s_{BV}$ vs. $L_{max}$ relation and determine that the bulk of SNe Ia (including the sub-luminous ones) are consistent with Ch-mass delayed-detonation explosions, where the main parameter driving the diversity is $\rho_{tr}$. We also find $\rho_{c}$ to be driving the second order scatter observed at the faint end of the luminosity-width relationship.
  • The nebular-epoch spectrum of the rapidly declining, "transitional" type Ia supernova (SN) 2007on showed double emission peaks, which have been interpreted as indicating that the SN was the result of the direct collision of two white dwarfs. The spectrum can be reproduced using two distinct emission components, one red-shifted and one blue shifted. These components are similar in mass but have slightly different degrees of ionization. They recede from one another at a line-of-sight speed larger than the sum of the combined expansion velocities of their emitting cores, thereby acting as two independent nebulae. While this configuration appears to be consistent with the scenario of two white dwarfs colliding, it may also indicate an off-centre delayed detonation explosion of a near Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf. In either case, broad emission line widths and a rapidly evolving light curve can be expected for the bolometric luminosity of the SN. This is the case for both SNe 2007on and 2011iv, also a transitional SN Ia which exploded in the same elliptical galaxy, NGC 1404. Although SN 2011iv does not show double-peaked emission line profiles, the width of its emission lines is such that a two-component model yields somewhat better results than a single-component model. Most of the mass ejected is in one component, however, which suggests that SN 2011iv was the result of the off-centre ignition of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf.
  • We present a study of observed Type II supernova (SN~II) colours using optical/near-infrared photometric data from the \textit{Carnegie Supernovae Project-I}. We analyse four colours ($B-V$, $u-g$, $g-r$, and $g-Y$) and find that SN~II colour curves can be described by two linear regimes during the photospheric phase. The first ($s_{\rm 1,colour}$) is steeper and has a median duration of $\sim 40$ days. The second, shallower slope ($s_{\rm 2,colour}$) lasts until the end of the "plateau" ($\sim 80$ days). The two slopes correlate in the sense that steeper initial colour curves also imply steeper colour curves at later phases. As suggested by recent studies, SNe~II form a continuous population of objects from the colour point of view as well. We investigate correlations between the observed colours and a range of photometric and spectroscopic parameters including the absolute magnitude, the $V$-band light-curve slopes, and metal-line strengths. We find that less luminous SNe~II appear redder, a trend that we argue is not driven by uncorrected host-galaxy reddening. While there is significant dispersion, we find evidence that redder SNe~II (mainly at early epochs) display stronger metal-line equivalent widths. Host-galaxy reddening does not appear to be a dominant parameter, neither driving observed trends nor dominating the dispersion in observed colours. Intrinsic SN~II colours are most probably dominated by photospheric temperature differences, with progenitor metallicity possibly playing a minor role. Such temperature differences could be related to differences in progenitor radius, together with the presence or absence of circumstellar material close to the progenitor stars.
  • We present our analysis of the Type II supernova DLT16am (SN~2016ija). The object was discovered during the ongoing $\rm{D}<40\,\rm{Mpc}$ (DLT40) one day cadence supernova search at $r\sim20.1\,\rm{mag}$ in the `edge-on' nearby ($D=20.0\pm1.9\,\rm{Mpc}$) galaxy NGC~1532. The subsequent prompt and high-cadenced spectroscopic and photometric follow-up revealed a highly extincted transient, with $E(B-V)=1.95\pm0.15\,\rm{mag}$, consistent with a standard extinction law with $R_V=3.1$ and a bright ($M_V=-18.49\pm0.65\,\rm{mag}$) absolute peak-magnitude. The comparison of the photometric features with those of large samples of Type II supernovae reveals a fast rise for the derived luminosity and a relatively short plateau phase, with a slope of $S_{50V}=0.84\pm0.04\,\rm{mag}/50\,\rm{d}$ consistent with the photometric properties typical of those of fast declining Type II supernovae. Despite the large uncertainties on the distance and the extinction in the direction of DLT16am, the measured photospheric expansion velocity and the derived absolute $V$-band magnitude at $\sim50\,\rm{d}$ after the explosion match the existing luminosity-velocity relation for Type II supernovae.
  • We present final natural system optical (ugriBV) and near-infrared (YJH) photometry of 134 supernovae (SNe) with probable white dwarf progenitors that were observed in 2004-2009 as part of the first stage of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I). The sample consists of 123 Type Ia SNe, 5 Type Iax SNe, 2 super-Chandrasekhar SN candidates, 2 Type Ia SNe interacting with circumstellar matter, and 2 SN 2006bt-like events. The redshifts of the objects range from z = 0.0037 to 0.0835; the median redshift is 0.0241. For 120 (90%) of these SNe, near-infrared photometry was obtained. Average optical extinction coefficients and color terms are derived and demonstrated to be stable during the five CSP-I observing campaigns. Measurements of the CSP-I near-infrared bandpasses are also described, and near-infrared color terms are estimated through synthetic photometry of stellar atmosphere models. Optical and near-infrared magnitudes of local sequences of tertiary standard stars for each supernova are given, and a new calibration of Y-band magnitudes of the Persson et al. (1998) standards in the CSP-I natural system is presented.
  • We present an analysis of ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared observations of the fast-declining Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) 2007on and 2011iv, hosted by the Fornax cluster member NGC 1404. The B-band light curves of SN 2007on and SN 2011iv are characterised by dm_15(B) decline-rate values of 1.96 mag and 1.77 mag, respectively. Although they have similar decline rates, their peak B- and H-band magnitudes differ by ~0.60 mag and ~0.35 mag, respectively. After correcting for the luminosity vs. decline rate and the luminosity vs. colour relations, the peak B-band and H-band light curves provide distances that differ by ~14% and ~9%, respectively. These findings serve as a cautionary tale for the use of transitional SNe Ia located in early-type hosts in the quest to measure cosmological parameters. Interestingly, even though SN 2011iv is brighter and bluer at early times, by three weeks past maximum and extending over several months, its B-V colour is 0.12 mag redder than that of SN 2007on. To reconcile this unusual behaviour, we turn to guidance from a suite of spherical one-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation explosion models. In this context, 56Ni production depends on both the so-called transition density and the central density of the progenitor white dwarf. To first order, the transition density drives the luminosity-width relation, while the central density is an important second-order parameter. Within this context, the differences in the B-V color evolution along the Lira regime suggests the progenitor of SN~2011iv had a higher central density than SN~2007on.
  • We study optical light curve(LC) relations of type Ia supernovae(SNe~Ia) for their use in cosmology using high-quality photometry published by the Carnegie-Supernovae-Project (CSP-I). We revisit the classical luminosity-decline-rate ($\Delta m_{15}$) relation and the Lira-relation, as well as investigate the time evolution of the ($B-V$) color and $B(B-V)$, which serves as the basis of the color-stretch relation and Color-MAGnitude-Intercept-Calibrations(CMAGIC). Our analysis is based on explosion and radiation transport simulations for spherically-symmetric delayed-detonation models(DDT) producing normal-bright and subluminous SNe~Ia. Empirical LC-relations can be understood as having the same physical underpinnings: i.e. the opacities, ionization balances in the photosphere, and radioactive energy deposition changing with time from below to above the photosphere. Some 3-4 weeks past maximum, the photosphere recedes to ${}^{56}$Ni-rich layers of similar density structure, leading to a similar color evolution. An important secondary parameter is the central density $\rho_c$ of the WD because at higher densities more electron capture elements are produced at the expense of ${}^{56}$Ni production. This results in a $\Delta m_{15}$ spread of 0.1 mag for normal-bright and 0.7 mag in sub-luminous SNe~Ia and $\approx0.2$ mag in the Lira-relation. We show why color-magnitude diagrams emphasize the transition between physical regimes, and allow to construct templates depend mostly on $\Delta m_{15}$ with little dispersion in both the CSP-I sample and our DDT-models. This allows to separate intrinsic SN~Ia variations from the interstellar reddening characterized by $E(B-V)$ and $R_{B}$. Mixing of different explosion scenarios causes a wide spread in empirical relations which may suggest one dominant scenario.
  • The first phase of the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) was a dedicated supernova follow-up program based at the Las Campanas Observatory that collected science data of young, low-redshift supernovae between 2004 and 2009. Presented in this paper is the CSP-I photometric data release of low-redshift stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae. The data consist of optical (uBgVri) photometry of 34 objects, with a subset of 26 having near-infrared (YJH) photometry. Twenty objects have optical pre-maximum coverage with a subset of 12 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of B-band maximum brightness. In the near-infrared, 17 objects have pre-maximum observations with a subset of 14 beginning at least five days prior to the epoch of J-band maximum brightness. Analysis of this photometric data release is presented in companion papers focusing on techniques to estimate host-galaxy extinction (Stritzinger et al., submitted) and the light-curve and progenitor star properties of the sample (Taddia et al., submitted). The analysis of an accompanying visual-wavelength spectroscopy sample of ~150 spectra will be the subject of a future paper.
  • Stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe) include H-poor (Type IIb), H-free (Type Ib) and He-free (Type Ic) events thought to be associated with the deaths of massive stars. The exact nature of their progenitors is a matter of debate. Here we present the analysis of the light curves of 34 SE SNe published by the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I), which are unparalleled in terms of photometric accuracy and wavelength range. Light-curve parameters are estimated through the fits of an analytical function and trends are searched for among the resulting fit parameters. We found a tentative correlation between the peak absolute $B$-band magnitude and $\Delta m_{15}(B)$, as well as a correlation between the late-time linear slope and $\Delta m_{15}$. Making use of the full set of optical and near-IR photometry, combined with robust host-galaxy extinction corrections, bolometric light curves are constructed and compared to both analytic and hydrodynamical models. From the hydrodynamical models we obtained ejecta masses of $1.1-6.2$ $M_{\odot}$, $^{56}$Ni masses of $0.03-0.35$ $M_{\odot}$, and explosion energies (excluding two SNe Ic-BL) of $0.25-3.0\times10^{51}$ erg. Our analysis indicates that adopting $\kappa = 0.07$ cm$^{2}$ g$^{-1}$ as the mean opacity serves to be a suitable assumption when comparing Arnett-model results to those obtained from hydrodynamical calculations. We also find that adopting He I and O I line velocities to infer the expansion velocity in He-rich and He-poor SNe, respectively, provides ejecta masses relatively similar to those obtained by using the Fe II line velocities. The inferred ejecta masses are compatible with intermediate mass ($M_{ZAMS} \leq 20$ $M_{\odot}$) progenitor stars in binary systems for the majority of SE SNe. Furthermore, the majority of our SNe is affected by significant mixing of $^{56}$Ni, particularly in the case of SNe Ic.
  • We aim to improve upon contemporary methods to estimate host-galaxy reddening of stripped-envelope (SE) supernovae (SNe). To this end the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP-I) SE SNe photometry data release, consisting of nearly three dozen objects, is used to identify a minimally reddened sub-sample for each traditionally defined spectroscopic sub-types (i.e, SNe~IIb, SNe~Ib, SNe~Ic). Inspection of the optical and near-infrared (NIR) colors and color evolution of the minimally reddened sub-samples reveals a high degree of homogeneity, particularly between 0d to +20d relative to B-band maximum. This motivated the construction of intrinsic color-curve templates, which when compared to the colors of reddened SE SNe, yields an entire suite of optical and NIR color excess measurements. Comparison of optical/optical vs. optical/NIR color excess measurements indicates the majority of the CSP-I SE SNe suffer relatively low amounts of reddening and we find evidence for different R_(V)^(host) values among different SE SN. Fitting the color excess measurements of the seven most reddened objects with the Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model provides robust estimates of the host visual-extinction A_(V)^(host) and R_(V)^(host). In the case of the SE SNe with relatively low amounts of reddening, a preferred value of R_(V)^(host) is adopted for each sub-type, resulting in estimates of A_(V)^(host) through Fitzpatrick (1999) reddening law model fits to the observed color excess measurements. Our analysis suggests SE SNe reside in galaxies characterized by a range of dust properties. We also find evidence SNe Ic are more likely to occur in regions characterized by larger R_(V)^(host) values compared to SNe IIb/Ib and they also tend to suffer more extinction. These findings are consistent with work in the literature suggesting SNe Ic tend to occur in regions of on-going star formation.
  • The coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will restrict spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence new methods based solely on photometric data must be developed. Here, we construct a complete Hubble diagram of Type II supernovae combining data from three different samples: the Carnegie Supernova Project-I, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II SN, and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Applying the Photometric Colour Method (PCM) to 73 Type II supernovae (SNe~II) with a redshift range of 0.01--0.5 and with no spectral information, we derive an intrinsic dispersion of 0.35 mag. A comparison with the Standard Candle Method (SCM) using 61 SNe~II is also performed and an intrinsic dispersion in the Hubble diagram of 0.27 mag is derived, i.e., 13\% in distance uncertainties. Due to the lack of good statistics at higher redshifts for both methods, only weak constraints on the cosmological parameters are obtained. However, assuming a flat Universe and using the PCM, we derive a Universe's matter density: $\Omega_{m}$=0.32$^{+0.30}_{-0.21}$ providing a new independent evidence for dark energy at the level of two sigma.
  • On 2014 Dec. 9.61, the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") discovered ASASSN-14lp just $\sim2$ days after first light using a global array of 14-cm diameter telescopes. ASASSN-14lp went on to become a bright supernova ($V = 11.94$ mag), second only to SN 2014J for the year. We present prediscovery photometry (with a detection less than a day after first light) and ultraviolet through near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic data covering the rise and fall of ASASSN-14lp for more than 100 days. We find that ASASSN-14lp had a broad light curve ($\Delta m_{15}(B) = 0.80 \pm 0.05$), a $B$-band maximum at $2457015.82 \pm 0.03$, a rise time of $16.94^{+ 0.11 }_{- 0.10 }$ days, and moderate host--galaxy extinction ($E(B-V)_{\textrm{host}} = 0.33 \pm 0.06$). Using ASASSN-14lp we derive a distance modulus for NGC 4666 of $\mu = 30.8 \pm 0.2$ corresponding to a distance of $14.7 \pm 1.5$ Mpc. However, adding ASASSN-14lp to the calibrating sample of Type Ia supernovae still requires an independent distance to the host galaxy. Finally, using our early-time photometric and spectroscopic observations, we rule out red giant secondaries and, assuming a favorable viewing angle and explosion time, any non-degenerate companion larger than $0.34 R_{\textrm{sun}}$.
  • We present near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic and photometric observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J. The seventeen NIR spectra span epochs from +15.3 to +92.5 days after $B$-band maximum light, while the $JHK_s$ photometry include epochs from $-$10 to +71 days. This data is used to constrain the progenitor system of SN 2014J utilizing the Pa$\beta$ line, following recent suggestions that this phase period and the NIR in particular are excellent for constraining the amount of swept up hydrogen-rich material associated with a non-degenerate companion star. We find no evidence for Pa$\beta$ emission lines in our post-maximum spectra, with a rough hydrogen mass limit of $\lesssim$0.1 $M_{\odot}$, which is consistent with previous limits in SN 2014J from late-time optical spectra of the H$\alpha$ line. Nonetheless, the growing dataset of high-quality NIR spectra holds the promise of very useful hydrogen constraints.
  • Spectral modelling of SNII atmospheres indicates a clear dependence of metal line strengths on progenitor metallicity. This motivates further work to evaluate the accuracy with which these SNe can be used as metallicity indicators. To assess this accuracy we present a sample of SNII HII-region spectroscopy, from which environment abundances are derived. These environment abundances are compared to the observed strength of metal lines in SN spectra. Combining our sample with measurements from the literature, we present oxygen abundances of 119 host HII regions, by extracting emission line fluxes and using abundance diagnostics. Then, following Dessart et al., these abundances are compared to equivalent widths of Fe 5018 A at various time and colour epochs. Our distribution of inferred SNII host HII-region abundances has a range of ~0.6 dex. We confirm the dearth of SNeII exploding at metallicities lower than those found (on average) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The equivalent width of Fe 5018 A at 50 days post explosion shows a statistically significant correlation with host HII-region oxygen abundance. The strength of this correlation increases if one excludes abundance measurements derived far from SN explosion sites. The correlation significance also increases if we only analyse a 'gold' IIP sample, and if a colour epoch is used in place of time. In addition, no evidence is found of correlation between progenitor metallicity and SN light-curve or spectral properties - except for that stated above with respect to Fe 5018 A equivalent width - suggesting progenitor metallicity is not a driving factor in producing the diversity observed in our sample. This study provides observational evidence of the usefulness of SNII as metallicity indicators. We finish with a discussion of the methodology needed to use SN spectra as independent metallicity diagnostics throughout the Universe.
  • We present extensive observations of the Type Ib/c SN2013ge from -13 to +457 days, including spectra and Swift UV-optical photometry beginning 2-4 days post-explosion. This data set makes SN2013ge one of the best observed normal Type Ib/c SN at early times---when the light curve is particularly sensitive to the progenitor configuration and mixing of radioactive elements---and reveals two distinct light curve components in the UV bands. The first component rises over 4-5 days and is visible for the first week post-explosion. Spectra of the first component have blue continua and show a plethora of high velocity (~15,000 km/s) but narrow (~3500 km/s) features, indicating that the line-forming region is restricted. The explosion parameters estimated for the bulk explosion are standard for Type Ib/c SN, and there is evidence for weak He features at early times. In addition, SN2013ge exploded in a low metallicity environment and we have obtained some of the deepest radio and X-ray limits for a Type Ib/c SN to date, which constrain the progenitor mass-loss rate. We are left with two distinct progenitor scenarios for SN2013ge, depending on our interpretation of the early emission. If the first component is cooling envelope emission, then the progenitor of SN2013ge either possessed a low-mass extended envelope or ejected a portion of its envelope in the final <1 year before core-collapse. Alternatively, if the first component is due to outwardly mixed Ni-56, then our observations are consistent with the asymmetric ejection of a distinct clump of nickel-rich material at high velocities. Current models for the collision of a SN shock with a binary companion cannot reproduce both the timescale and luminosity of the early emission in SN2013ge. Finally, the spectra of the first component of SN2013ge are similar to those of the rapidly-declining SN2002bj.
  • We use observed UV through near IR spectra to examine whether SN 2011fe can be understood in the framework of Branch-normal SNe Ia and to examine its individual peculiarities. As a benchmark, we use a delayed-detonation model with a progenitor metallicity of Z_solar/20. We study the sensitivity of features to variations in progenitor metallicity, the outer density profile, and the distribution of radioactive nickel. The effect of metallicity variations in the progenitor have a relatively small effect on the synthetic spectra. We also find that the abundance stratification of SN 2011fe resembles closely that of a delayed detonation model with a transition density that has been fit to other Branch-normal Type Ia supernovae. At early times, the model photosphere is formed in material with velocities that are too high, indicating that the photosphere recedes too slowly or that SN 2011fe has a lower specific energy in the outer ~0.1 M_sun than does the model. We discuss several explanations for the discrepancies. Finally, we examine variations in both the spectral energy distribution and in the colors due to variations in the progenitor metallicity, which suggests that colors are only weak indicators for the progenitor metallicity, in the particular explosion model that we have studied. We do find that the flux in the U band is significantly higher at maximum light in the solar metallicity model than in the lower metallicity model and the lower metallicity model much better matches the observed spectrum.
  • SN 2013dy is a Type Ia supernova for which we have compiled an extraordinary dataset spanning from 0.1 to ~ 500 days after explosion. We present 10 epochs of ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared (NIR) spectra with HST/STIS, 47 epochs of optical spectra (15 of them having high resolution), and more than 500 photometric observations in the BVrRiIZYJH bands. SN 2013dy has a broad and slowly declining light curve (delta m(B) = 0.92 mag), shallow Si II 6355 absorption, and a low velocity gradient. We detect strong C II in our earliest spectra, probing unburned progenitor material in the outermost layers of the SN ejecta, but this feature fades within a few days. The UV continuum of SN 2013dy, which is strongly affected by the metal abundance of the progenitor star, suggests that SN 2013dy had a relatively high-metallicity progenitor. Examining one of the largest single set of high-resolution spectra for a SN Ia, we find no evidence of variable absorption from circumstellar material. Combining our UV spectra, NIR photometry, and high-cadence optical photometry, we construct a bolometric light curve, showing that SN 2013dy had a maximum luminosity of 10.0^{+4.8}_{-3.8} * 10^{42} erg/s. We compare the synthetic light curves and spectra of several models to SN 2013dy, finding that SN 2013dy is in good agreement with a solar-metallicity W7 model.
  • We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of six nearby Type~Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, three of which were also observed in the near-IR (NIR) with Wide-Field Camera~3. UV observations with the Swift satellite, as well as ground-based optical and near-infrared data provide complementary information. The combined data-set covers the wavelength range $0.2$--$2~\mu$m. By also including archival data of SN 2014J, we analyse a sample spanning observed colour excesses up to $E(B-V)=1.4~$mag. We study the wavelength dependent extinction of each individual SN and find a diversity of reddening laws when characterised by the total-to-selective extinction $R_V$. In particular, we note that for the two SNe with $E(B-V)\gtrsim1~$mag, for which the colour excess is dominated by dust extinction, we find $R_V=1.4\pm0.1$ and $R_V=2.8\pm0.1$. Adding UV photometry reduces the uncertainty of fitted $R_V$ by $\sim50\,$% allowing us to also measure $R_V$ of individual low-extinction objects which point to a similar diversity, currently not accounted for in the analyses when SNe~Ia are used for studying the expansion history of the universe.
  • May 10, 2015 astro-ph.SR, astro-ph.IM
    The Public European Southern Observatory Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects (PESSTO) began as a public spectroscopic survey in April 2012. We describe the data reduction strategy and data products which are publicly available through the ESO archive as the Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 1 (SSDR1). PESSTO uses the New Technology Telescope with EFOSC2 and SOFI to provide optical and NIR spectroscopy and imaging. We target supernovae and optical transients brighter than 20.5mag for classification. Science targets are then selected for follow-up based on the PESSTO science goal of extending knowledge of the extremes of the supernova population. The EFOSC2 spectra cover 3345-9995A (at resolutions of 13-18 Angs) and SOFI spectra cover 0.935-2.53 micron (resolutions 23-33 Angs) along with JHK imaging. This data release contains spectra from the first year (April 2012 - 2013), consisting of all 814 EFOSC2 spectra and 95 SOFI spectra (covering 298 distinct objects), in standard ESO Phase 3 format. We estimate the accuracy of the absolute flux calibrations for EFOSC2 to be typically 15%, and the relative flux calibration accuracy to be about 5%. The PESSTO standard NIR reduction process does not yet produce high accuracy absolute spectrophotometry but the SOFI JHK imaging will improve this. Future data releases will focus on improving the automated flux calibration of the data products.
  • We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I {\lambda}1.0693 {\mu}m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely-cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with {\Delta}m15(B) = 1.79 $\pm$ 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categorized as a "transitional" event, on the fast-declining end of normal SNe Ia as opposed to subluminous/91bg-like objects. iPTF13ebh shows NIR spectroscopic properties that are distinct from both the normal and subluminous/91bg-like classes, bridging the observed characteristics of the two classes. These NIR observations suggest composition and density of the inner core similar to that of 91bg-like events, and a deep reaching carbon burning layer not observed in slower declining SNe Ia. There is also a substantial difference between the explosion times inferred from the early-time light curve and the velocity evolution of the Si II {\lambda}0.6355 {\mu}m line, implying a long dark phase of ~ 4 days.
  • We present multi-band ultraviolet and optical light curves, as well as visual-wavelength and near-infrared spectroscopy of the Type II linear (IIL) supernova (SN) 2013by. We show that SN 2013by and other SNe IIL in the literature, after their linear decline phase that start after maximum, have a sharp light curve decline similar to that seen in Type II plateau (IIP) supernovae. This light curve feature has rarely been observed in other SNe IIL due to their relative rarity and the intrinsic faintness of this particular phase of the light curve. We suggest that the presence of this drop could be used as a physical parameter to distinguish between subclasses of SNe II, rather than their light curve decline rate shortly after peak. Close inspection of the spectra of SN 2013by indicate asymmetric line profiles and signatures of high-velocity hydrogen. Late (less than 90 days after explosion) near-infrared spectra of SN 2013by exhibit oxygen lines, indicating significant mixing within the ejecta. From the late-time light curve, we estimate that 0.029 solar mass of 56Ni was synthesized during the explosion. It is also shown that the V -band light curve slope is responsible for part of the scatter in the luminosity (V magnitude 50 days after explosion) vs. 56Ni relation. Our observations of SN 2013by and other SNe IIL through the onset of the nebular phase indicate that their progenitors are similar to those of SNe IIP.