• The population of large asteroids is thought to be primordial and they are the most direct witnesses of the early history of our Solar System. Those satellites allow study of the mass, and hence density and internal structure. We study here the properties of the triple asteroid (107) Camilla from lightcurves, stellar occultations, optical spectroscopy, and high-contrast and high-angular-resolution images and spectro-images. Using 80 positions over 15 years, we determine the orbit of its larger satellite to be circular, equatorial, and prograde, with RMS residuals of 7.8 mas. From 11 positions in three epochs only, in 2015 and 2016, we determine a preliminary orbit for the second satellite. We find the orbit to be somewhat eccentric and slightly inclined to the primary's equatorial plane, reminiscent of the inner satellites of other asteroid triple systems. Comparison of the near-infrared spectrum of the larger satellite reveals no significant difference with Camilla. Hence, these properties argue for a formation of the satellites by excavation from impact and re-accumulation of ejecta. We determine the spin and 3-D shape of Camilla. The model fits well each data set. We determine Camilla to be larger than reported from modeling of mid-infrared photometry, with a spherical-volume-equivalent diameter of 254 $\pm$ 36 km (3 $\sigma$ uncertainty), in agreement with recent results from shape modeling (Hanus2017+). Combining the mass of (1.12 $\pm$ 0.01) $\times$ 10$^{19}$ kg determined from the dynamics of the satellites and the volume from the 3-D shape model, we determine a density of 1,280 $\pm$ 130 SI. From this density, and considering Camilla's spectral similarities with (24) Themis and (65) Cybele (for which water ice coating on surface grains was reported), we infer a silicate-to-ice mass ratio of 1-6, with a 10-30% macroporosity.
  • Context. The high-angular-resolution capability of the new-generation ground-based adaptive-optics camera SPHERE at ESO VLT allows us to assess, for the very first time, the cratering record of medium-sized (D~100-200 km) asteroids from the ground, opening the prospect of a new era of investigation of the asteroid belt's collisional history. Aims. We investigate here the collisional history of asteroid (6) Hebe and challenge the idea that Hebe may be the parent body of ordinary H chondrites, the most common type of meteorites found on Earth (~34% of the falls). Methods. We observed Hebe with SPHERE as part of the science verification of the instrument. Combined with earlier adaptive-optics images and optical light curves, we model the spin and three-dimensional (3D) shape of Hebe and check the consistency of the derived model against available stellar occultations and thermal measurements. Results. Our 3D shape model fits the images with sub-pixel residuals and the light curves to 0.02 mag. The rotation period (7.274 47 h), spin (343 deg,+47 deg), and volume-equivalent diameter (193 +/- 6km) are consistent with previous determinations and thermophysical modeling. Hebe's inferred density is 3.48 +/- 0.64 g.cm-3 , in agreement with an intact interior based on its H-chondrite composition. Using the 3D shape model to derive the volume of the largest depression (likely impact crater), it appears that the latter is significantly smaller than the total volume of close-by S-type H-chondrite-like asteroid families. Conclusions. Our results imply that (6) Hebe is not the most likely source of H chondrites. Over the coming years, our team will collect similar high-precision shape measurements with VLT/SPHERE for ~40 asteroids covering the main compositional classes, thus providing an unprecedented dataset to investigate the origin and collisional evolution of the asteroid belt.
  • Anhydrous pyroxene-rich interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have been proposed as surface analogs for about two-thirds of all C-complex asteroids. However, this suggestion appears to be inconsistent with the presence of hydrated silicates on the surfaces of some of these asteroids including Ceres. Here we report the presence of enstatite (pyroxene) on the surface of two C-type asteroids (Ceres and Eugenia) based on their spectral properties in the mid-infrared range. The presence of this component is particularly unexpected in the case of Ceres because most thermal evolution models predict a surface consisting of hydrated compounds only. The most plausible scenario is that Ceres' surface has been partially contaminated by exogenous enstatite-rich material, possibly coming from the Beagle asteroid family. This scenario questions a similar origin for Ceres and the remaining C-types, and it possibly supports recent results obtained by the Dawn mission (NASA) that Ceres may have formed in the very outer solar system. Concerning the smaller C-types such as Eugenia, both their derived surface composition (enstatite and amorphous silicates) and low density suggest that these bodies accreted from the same building blocks, namely chondritic porous, pyroxene-rich IDPs and volatiles (mostly water ice), and that a significant volume fraction of these bodies has remained unaffected by hydrothermal activity likely implying a late accretion. In addition, their current heliocentric distance may best explain the presence or absence of water ice at their surfaces. Finally, we raise the possibility that CI chondrites, Tagish Lake-like material, or hydrated IDPs may be representative samples of the cores of these bodies.
  • We present the discovery of a new satellite of asteroid (130) Elektra - S/2014 (130) 1 - in differential imaging and in integral field spectroscopy data over multiple epochs obtained with SPHERE/VLT. This new (second) moonlet of Elektra is about 2 km across, on an eccentric orbit and about 500 km away from the primary. For a comparative study, we also observed another triple asteroid system (93) Minerva. For both systems, component-resolved reflectance spectra of the satellites and primary were obtained simultaneously. No significant spectral difference was observed between the satellites and the primary for either triple system. We find that the moonlets in both systems are more likely to have been created by sub-disruptive impacts as opposed to having been captured.
  • Context. It has recently been proposed that the surface composition of icy main-belt asteroids (B-,C-,Cb-,Cg-,P-,and D-types) may be consistent with that of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CPIDPs). Aims. In the light of this new association, we re-examine the surface composition of a sample of asteroids belonging to the Themis family in order to place new constraints on the formation and evolution of its parent body. Methods. We acquired NIR spectral data for 15 members of the Themis family and complemented this dataset with existing spectra in the visible and mid-infrared ranges to perform a thorough analysis of the composition of the family. Assuming end-member minerals and particle sizes (<2\mum) similar to those found in CPIDPs, we used a radiative transfer code adapted for light scattering by small particles to model the spectral properties of these asteroids. Results. Our best-matching models indicate that most objects in our sample possess a surface composition that is consistent with the composition of CP IDPs.We find ultra-fine grained Fe-bearing olivine glasses to be among the dominant constituents. We further detect the presence of minor fractions of Mg-rich crystalline silicates. The few unsuccessfully matched asteroids may indicate the presence of interlopers in the family or objects sampling a distinct compositional layer of the parent body. Conclusions. The composition inferred for the Themis family members suggests that the parent body accreted from a mixture of ice and anhydrous silicates (mainly amorphous) and subsequently underwent limited heating. By comparison with existing thermal models that assume a 400km diameter progenitor, the accretion process of the Themis parent body must have occurred relatively late (>4Myr after CAIs) so that only moderate internal heating occurred in its interior, preventing aqueous alteration of the outer shell.