• We present the first results from the SAGE-Var program, a follow on to the Spitzer legacy program Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE; Meixner, et al. 2006). We obtained 4 epochs of photometry at 3.6 & 4.5 microns covering the bar of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the central region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in order to probe the variability of extremely red sources missed by variability surveys conducted at shorter wavelengths, and to provide additional epochs of observation for known variables. Our 6 total epochs of observations allow us to probe infrared variability on 15 different timescales ranging from ~20 days to ~5 years. Out of a full catalog of 1,717,554 (LMC) and 457,760 (SMC) objects, we find 10 (LMC) and 6 (SMC) large amplitude AGB variables without optically measured variability owing to circumstellar dust obscuration. The catalog also contains multiple observations of known AGB variables, type I and II Cepheids, eclipsing variables, R CrB stars and young stellar objects which will be discussed in following papers. Here we present infrared Period-Luminosity (PL) relations for classical Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds, as well as improved PL relationships for AGB stars pulsating in the fundamental mode using mean magnitudes constructed from 6 epochs of observations.
  • We present new Spitzer/IRS spectra of two hot R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars, one in the Galaxy,V348 Sgr, and one lying in the LMC, HV 2671. These two objects may constitute a link between the RCB stars and the late Wolf-Rayet ([WCL]) class of central stars of planetary nebula (CSPNe) such as CPD -56 8032 that has little or no hydrogen in their atmospheres. HV 2671 and V348 Sgr are members of a rare subclass that has significantly higher effective temperatures than most RCB stars, but sharing the traits of hydrogen deficiency and dust formation that define the cooler RCB stars. The [WC] CSPNe star, CPD -56 8032, displays evidence for dual-dust chemistry showing both PAHs and crystalline silicates in its mid-IR spectrum. HV 2671 shows strong PAH emission but shows no sign of having crystalline silicates. The spectrum of V348 Sgr is very different from those of CPD -56 8032 and HV 2671. The PAH emission seen strongly in the other two stars is not present. Instead, the spectrum is dominated by a broad emission centered at about 8.2 micron. The mid-IR spectrum of CPD -56 8032 shows emission features that may be associated with C60. The other two stars do not show evidence for C60. HV 2671 has also been detected by Herschel/PACS and SPIRE. V348 Sgr and CPD -56 8032 have been detected by AKARI/FIS. These data were combined with Spitzer, IRAS, 2MASS and other photometry to produce their spectral energy distributions from the visible to the far-IR. Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling was used to study the circumstellar dust around these stars. HV 2671 and CPD -56 8032 require both a flared inner disk with warm dust and an extended diffuse envelope with cold dust to to fit their SEDs. The SED of V348 Sgr can be fit with a much smaller disk and envelope.
  • We present the photometric catalogs for the star-forming cluster NGC 602 in the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud covering a range of wavelengths from optical HST/ACS (F555W, F814W) and SMARTS/ANDICAM (V, I) to infrared (Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 micron and MIPS 24 micron). Combining this with IRSF (InfraRed Survey Facility) near-infrared photometry (J, H, Ks), we compare the young main sequence (MS) and pre-main sequence (PMS) populations prominent in the optical with the current young stellar object (YSO) populations revealed by the infrared (IR). We analyze the MS and PMS population with isochrones in color-magnitude diagrams to derive ages and masses. The optical data reveal ~565 PMS candidates, low mass Stage III YSOs. We characterize ~40 YSOs by fitting their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to a grid of models (Robitaille et al. 2007) to derive luminosities, masses and evolutionary phase (Stage I-III). The higher resolution HST images reveal that ~70% of the YSO candidates are either multiples or protoclusters. For YSOs and PMS sources found in common, we find a consistency in the masses derived. We use the YSO mass function to derive a present-day star-formation rate of ~0.2-1.0 Msun/yr/kpc^2, similar to the rate derived from the optical star formation history suggesting a constant star formation rate for this region. We demonstrate a progression of star formation from the optical star cluster center to the edge of the star forming dust cloud. We derive lifetimes of a few 10^5 years for the YSO Stages I and II.
  • Using Spitzer IRAC observations from the SAGE-SMC Legacy program and archived Spitzer IRAC data, we investigate dust production in 47 Tuc, a nearby massive Galactic globular cluster. A previous study detected infrared excess, indicative of circumstellar dust, in a large population of stars in 47 Tuc, spanning the entire Red Giant Branch (RGB). We show that those results suffered from effects caused by stellar blending and imaging artifacts and that it is likely that no stars below about 1 mag from the tip of the RGB are producing dust. The only stars that appear to harbor dust are variable stars, which are also the coolest and most luminous stars in the cluster.
  • (abridged) We study photoelectric heating throughout the Large Magellanic Cloud. We quantify the importance of the [CII] cooling line and the photoelectric heating process of various environments in the LMC and investigate which parameters control the extent of photoelectric heating. We use the BICE [CII] map and the Spitzer/SAGE infrared maps. We examine the spatial variations in the efficiency of photoelectric heating: photoelectric heating rate over power absorbed by grains. We correlate the photoelectric heating efficiency and the emission from various dust constituents and study the variations as a function of H\alpha emission, dust temperatures, and the total infrared luminosity. From this we estimate radiation field, gas temperature, and electron density. We find systematic variations in photoelectric efficiency. The highest efficiencies are found in the diffuse medium, while the lowest coincide with bright star-forming regions (~1.4 times lower). The [CII] line emission constitutes 1.32% of the far infrared luminosity across the whole of the LMC. We find correlations between the [CII] emission and ratios of the mid infrared and far infrared bands, which comprise various dust constituents. The correlations are interpreted in light of the spatial variations of the dust abundance and by the local environmental conditions that affect the dust emission properties. As a function of the total infrared surface brightness, S_{TIR}, the [CII] surface brightness can be described as: S_{[CII]}=1.25 S_{TIR}^{0.69} [10^{-3} erg s^{-1} cm^{-2} sr^{-1}]. The [CII] emission is well-correlation with the 8 micrometer emission, suggesting that the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons play a dominant role in the photoelectric heating process.
  • The Tail region of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was imaged using the MIPS instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the SAGE-SMC Spitzer Legacy. Diffuse infrared emission from dust was detected in all the MIPS bands. The Tail gas-to-dust ratio was measured to be 1200 +/- 350 using the MIPS observations combined with existing IRAS and HI observations. This gas-to-dust ratio is higher than the expected 500-800 from the known Tail metallicity indicating possible destruction of dust grains. Two cluster regions in the Tail were resolved into multiple sources in the MIPS observations and local gas-to-dust ratios were measured to be ~440 and ~250 suggests dust formation and/or significant amounts of ionized gas in these regions. These results support the interpretation that the SMC Tail is a tidal tail recently stripped from the SMC that includes gas, dust, and young stars.
  • We present new Spitzer photometry of the Eagle Nebula (M16, containing the optical cluster NGC 6611) combined with near-infrared photometry from 2MASS. We use dust radiative transfer models, mid-infrared and near-infrared color-color analysis, and mid-infrared spectral indices to analyze point source spectral energy distributions, select candidate young stellar objects (YSOs), and constrain their mass and evolutionary state. Comparison of the different protostellar selection methods shows that mid-infrared methods are consistent, but as has been known for some time, near-infrared-only analysis misses some young objects. We reveal more than 400 protostellar candidates, including one massive young stellar object (YSO) that has not been previously highlighted. The YSO distribution supports a picture of distributed low-level star formation, with no strong evidence of triggered star formation in the ``pillars''. We confirm the youth of NGC 6611 by a large fraction of infrared-excess sources, and reveal a younger cluster of YSOs in the nearby molecular cloud. Analysis of the YSO clustering properties shows a possible imprint of the molecular cloud's Jeans length. Multiwavelength mid-IR imaging thus allows us to analyze the protostellar population, to measure the dust temperature and column density, and to relate these in a consistent picture of star formation in M16.
  • Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented for the Spitzer SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). IRAC and MIPS 24 um epoch one data are presented. These data represent the deepest, widest mid-infrared CMDs of their kind ever produced in the LMC. Combined with the 2MASS survey, the diagrams are used to delineate the evolved stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud as well as Galactic foreground and extragalactic background populations. Some 32000 evolved stars brighter than the tip of the red giant branch are identified. Of these, approximately 17500 are classified as oxygen-rich, 7000 carbon-rich, and another 1200 as ``extreme'' asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Brighter members of the latter group have been called ``obscured'' AGB stars in the literature owing to their dusty circumstellar envelopes. A large number (1200) of luminous oxygen--rich AGB stars/M supergiants are also identified. Finally, there is strong evidence from the 24 um MIPS channel that previously unexplored, lower luminosity oxygen-rich AGB stars contribute significantly to the mass loss budget of the LMC (1200 such sources are identified).
  • FUSE spectra of 100 extragalactic objects are analyzed to obtain measures of O VI absorption along paths through the Milky Way thick disk/halo. Strong O VI absorption over the approximate velocity range from -100 to 100 km/s reveals a widespread but highly irregular distribution of thick disk O VI, implying the existence of substantial amounts of hot gas with T ~ 3x10^5 K in the Milky Way halo. Large irregularities in the distribution of the absorbing gas are found to be similar over angular scales extending from less than one to 180 degrees, indicating a considerable amount of small and large scale structure in the gas. The overall distribution of Galactic O VI is not well described by a symmetrical plane-parallel layer of patchy O VI absorption. The simplest departure from such a model that provides a reasonable fit to the observations is a plane-parallel patchy absorbing layer with a scale height of 2.3 kpc, and a 0.25 dex excess of O VI in the northern Galactic polar region. The O VI absorption has a Doppler parameter b = 30 to 99 km/s, with an average value of 60 km/s . Thermal broadening alone cannot explain the large observed profile widths. The average O VI absorption velocities toward high latitude objects range from -46 to 82 km/s, with a sample average of 0 km/s and a standard deviation of 21 km/s. O VI associated with the thick disk moves both toward and away from the plane with roughly equal frequency. A combination of models involving the radiative cooling of hot fountain gas, the cooling of supernova bubbles in the halo, and the turbulent mixing of warm and hot halo gases is required to explain the presence of O VI and other highly ionized atoms found in the halo. (abbreviated)
  • We present FUSE observations of OVI absorption in a sample of 100 extragalactic targets and 2 distant halo stars. We describe the details of the calibration, alignment in velocity, continuum fitting, and manner in which contaminants were removed (Galactic H2, absorption intrinsic to the background target and intergalactic Ly-beta lines). We searched for OVI absorption in the velocity range -1200 to 1200 km/s. With a few exceptions, we only find OVI between -400 and 400 km/s; the exceptions may be intergalactic OVI. We discuss the separation of the observed OVI absorption into components associated with the Galactic halo and components at high-velocity, which are probably located in the neighborhood of the Galaxy. We describe the measurements of equivalent width and column density, and we analyze the different contributions to the errors. We conclude that low-velocity Galactic OVI absorption occurs along all sightlines - the few non-detections only occur in noisy spectra. We further show that high-velocity OVI is very common, having equivalent width >65 mAA in 50% of the sightlines and >30 mAA in 70% of the high-quality sightlines. The high-velocity OVI absorption has velocities relative to the LSR of +/-(100--330) km/s; there is no correlation between velocity and absorption strength. We present 50 km/s wide OVI channel maps. These show evidence for the imprint of Galactic rotation. They also highlight two known HI high-velocity clouds (complex~C and the Magellanic Stream). The channel maps further show that OVI at velocities <-200 km/s occurs along all sightlines in the region l=20-150, b<-30, while OVI at velocities >200 km/s occurs along all sightlines in the region l=180-300, b>20 (abbreviated).
  • We report the results of an extensive FUSE study of high velocity OVI absorption along 102 complete sight lines through the Galactic halo. The high velocity OVI traces a variety of phenomena, including tidal interactions with the Magellanic Clouds, accretion of gas, outflow from the Galactic disk, warm/hot gas interactions in a highly extended Galactic corona, and intergalactic gas in the Local Group. We identify 85 high velocity OVI features at velocities of -500 < v(LSR) < +500 km/s along 59 of the 102 sight lines. Approximately 60% of the sky (and perhaps as much as 85%) is covered by high velocity H+ associated with the high velocity OVI. Some of the OVI is associated with known high velocity HI structures (e.g., the Magellanic Stream, Complexes A and C), while some OVI features have no counterpart in HI 21cm emission. The smaller dispersion in the OVI velocities in the GSR and LGSR reference frames compared to the LSR is necessary (but not conclusive) evidence that some of the clouds are extragalactic. Most of the OVI cannot be produced by photoionization, even if the gas is irradiated by extragalactic background radiation. Collisions in hot gas are the primary OVI ionization mechanism. We favor production of some of the OVI at the boundaries between warm clouds and a highly extended [R > 70 kpc], hot [T > 10^6 K], low-density [n < 10^-4 cm^-3] Galactic corona or Local Group medium. A hot Galactic corona or Local Group medium and the prevalence of high velocity OVI are consistent with predictions of galaxy formation scenarios. Distinguishing between the various phenomena producing high velocity OVI will require continuing studies of the distances, kinematics, elemental abundances, and physical states of the different types of high velocity OVI features found in this study. (abbreviated)