• Autoionization, which results from the interference between direct photoionization and photoexcitation to a discrete state decaying to the continuum by configuration interaction, is a well known example of the important role of electron correlation in light-matter interaction. Information on this process can be obtained by studying the spectral, or equivalently, temporal complex amplitude of the ionized electron wavepacket. Using an energy-resolved interferometric technique, we measure the spectral amplitude and phase of autoionized wavepackets emitted via the sp2+ and sp3+ resonances in helium. These measurements allow us to reconstruct the corresponding temporal profiles by Fourier transform. In addition, applying various time-frequency representations, we observe the build up of the wavepackets in the continuum, monitor the instantaneous frequencies emitted at any time and disentangle the dynamics of the direct and resonant ionization channels.
  • Ultrafast processes in matter, such as the electron emission following light absorption, can now be studied using ultrashort light pulses of attosecond duration ($10^{-18}$s) in the extreme ultraviolet spectral range. The lack of spectral resolution due to the use of short light pulses may raise serious issues in the interpretation of the experimental results and the comparison with detailed theoretical calculations. Here, we determine photoionization time delays in neon atoms over a 40 eV energy range with an interferometric technique combining high temporal and spectral resolution. We spectrally disentangle direct ionization from ionization with shake up, where a second electron is left in an excited state, thus obtaining excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and thereby solving a puzzle raised by seven-year-old measurements. Our experimental approach does not have conceptual limits, allowing us to foresee, with the help of upcoming laser technology, ultra-high resolution time-frequency studies from the visible to the x-ray range.
  • We present observations of the emission of XUV continua in the 20-37 eV region by high harmonic generation (HHG) with $4$-$7\ \mathrm{fs}$ pulses focused onto a Kr gas jet. The underlying mechanism relies on coherent control of the relative delays and phases between individually generated attosecond pulse, achievable by adjusting the chirp of the driving pulses and the interaction geometry. Under adequate negative chirp and phase matching conditions, the resulting interpulse interference yields a continuum XUV spectrum, which is due to both microscopic and macroscopic (propagation) contributions. This technique opens the route for modifying the phase of individual attosecond pulses and for the coherent synthesis of XUV continua from multicycle driving laser pulses without the need of an isolated attosecond burst.
  • Nonlinear optical methods are becoming ubiquitous in many areas of modern photonics. They are, however, often limited to a certain range of input parameters, such as pulse energy and average power, since restrictions arise from, for example, parasitic nonlinear effects, damage problems and geometrical considerations. Here, we show that many nonlinear optics phenomena in gaseous media are scale-invariant if spatial coordinates, gas density and laser pulse energy are scaled appropriately. We develop a general scaling model for (3+1)-dimensional wave equations, demonstrating the invariant scaling of nonlinear pulse propagation in gases. Our model is numerically applied to high-order harmonic generation and filamentation as well as experimentally verified using the example of pulse post-compression via filamentation. Our results provide a simple recipe for up-or downscaling of nonlinear processes in gases with numerous applications in many areas of science.
  • We study the photoionization of argon atoms close to the 3s$^2$3p$^6$ $\rightarrow$ 3s$^1$3p$^6$4p $\leftrightarrow$ 3s$^2$3p$^5$ $\varepsilon \ell$, $\ell$=s,d Fano window resonance. An interferometric technique using an attosecond pulse train, i.e. a frequency comb in the extreme ultraviolet range, and a weak infrared probe field allows us to study both amplitude and phase of the photoionization probability amplitude as a function of photon energy. A theoretical calculation of the ionization process accounting for several continuum channels and bandwidth effects reproduces well the experimental observations and shows that the phase variation of the resonant two-photon amplitude depends on the interaction between the channels involved in the autoionization process.
  • We present an all-optical method to load 174Yb atoms into a single layer of an optical trap near the surface of a solid immersion lens which improves the numerical aperture of a microscope system. Atoms are transported to a region 20 um below the surface using a system comprised by three optical dipole traps. The "optical accordion" technique is used to create a condensate and compress the atoms to a width of 120 nm and a distance of 1.8 um away from the surface. Moreover, we are able to verify that after compression the condensate behaves as a two-dimensional quantum gas.
  • We present experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of photoionization time delays from the $3s$ and $3p$ shells in Ar in the photon energy range of 32-42 eV. The experimental measurements are performed by interferometry using attosecond pulse trains and the infrared laser used for their generation. The theoretical approach includes intershell correlation effects between the 3s and 3p shells within the framework of the random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE). The connection between single-photon ionization and the two-color two-photon ionization process used in the measurement is established using the recently developed asymptotic approximation for the complex transition amplitudes of laser-assisted photoionization. We compare and discuss the theoretical and experimental results especially in the region where strong intershell correlations in the 3s to kp channel lead to an induced "Cooper" minimum in the 3s ionization cross-section.
  • We study resonant two-color two-photon ionization of Helium via the 1s3p 1P1 state. The first color is the 15th harmonic of a tunable titanium sapphire laser, while the second color is the fundamental laser radiation. Our method uses phase-locked high-order harmonics to determine the {\it phase} of the two-photon process by interferometry. The measurement of the two-photon ionization phase variation as a function of detuning from the resonance and intensity of the dressing field allows us to determine the intensity dependence of the transition energy.
  • We perform a combined X-ray and strong lensing analysis of RX J1347.5-1145, one of the most luminous galaxy clusters at X-ray wavelengths. We show that evidence from strong lensing alone, based on published VLT and new HST data, strongly argues in favor of a complex structure. The analysis takes into account arc positions, shapes and orientations and is done thoroughly in the image plane. The cluster inner regions are well fitted by a bimodal mass distribution, with a total projected mass of $M_{tot} = (9.9 \pm 0.3)\times 10^{14} M_\odot/h$ within a radius of $360 \mathrm{kpc}/h$ ($1.5'$). Such a complex structure could be a signature of a recent major merger as further supported by X-ray data. A temperature map of the cluster, based on deep Chandra observations, reveals a hot front located between the first main component and an X-ray emitting South Eastern sub-clump. The map also unveils a filament of cold gas in the innermost regions of the cluster, most probably a cooling wake caused by the motion of the cD inside the cool core region. A merger scenario in the plane of the sky between two dark matter sub-clumps is consistent with both our lensing and X-ray analyses, and can explain previous discrepancies with mass estimates based on the virial theorem.
  • Warm Dark Matter (WDM) has been invoked to resolve apparent conflicts of Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models with observations on subgalactic scales. In this work we provide a new and independent lower limit for the WDM particle mass (e.g. sterile neutrino) through the analysis of image fluxes in gravitationally lensed QSOs. Starting from a theoretical unperturbed cusp configuration we analyze the effects of intergalactic haloes in modifying the fluxes of QSO multiple images, giving rise to the so-called anomalous flux ratio. We found that the global effect of such haloes strongly depends on their mass/abundance ratio and it is maximized for haloes in the mass range $10^6-10^8 \Msun$. This result opens up a new possibility to constrain CDM predictions on small scales and test different warm candidates, since free streaming of warm dark matter particles can considerably dampen the matter power spectrum in this mass range. As a consequence, while a ($\Lambda$)CDM model is able to produce flux anomalies at a level similar to those observed, a WDM model, with an insufficiently massive particle, fails to reproduce the observational evidences. Our analysis suggests a lower limit of a few keV ($m_{\nu} \sim 10$) for the mass of warm dark matter candidates in the form of a sterile neutrino. This result makes sterile neutrino Warm Dark Matter less attractive as an alternative to Cold Dark Matter, in good agreement with previous findings from Lyman-$\alpha$ forest and Cosmic Microwave Background analysis.
  • Aims. Falomo et al. (2005) discovered a disk-like galaxy at ~ 1.2 arcsec from the QSO Q0045-3337 by means of ESO VLT adaptive optics. They estimated a galaxy Einstein radius (for a point mass) of comparable size, thus pointing up the existence of a new, rare, spiral lens candidate, despite no evident image splitting. Here we discuss the possible lensing effect of the galaxy in some more detail. Methods. We performed two dimensional surface photometry on the VLT image of the galaxy, confirming its spiral nature. We then verified if simple mass models, partially constrained by observational data, require unrealistic parameters to produce a still hidden second quasar image. We also evaluated the respective viability of an instrumental or a lensing origin of the observed QSO deformation. Results. After galaxy model subtraction, we found a residual image, likely not related to gravitational lensing. Existing data are not sufficient to assess the presence of image splitting, nor to constrain the number of images or discriminate between galaxy mass models. Conclusion. Further observations are mandatory to progress in the study of this remarkable system, that could shed more light on the lensing behaviour of spiral galaxies.