• Dust trapping accelerates the coagulation of dust particles, and thus it represents an initial step toward the formation of planetesimals. We report $H$-band (1.6 um) linear polarimetric observations and 0.87 mm interferometric continuum observations toward a transitional disk around LkHa 330. As results, a pair of spiral arms were detected in the $H$-band emission and an asymmetric (potentially arm-like) structure was detected in the 0.87 mm continuum emission. We discuss the origin of the spiral arm and the asymmetric structure, and suggest that a massive unseen planet is the most plausible explanation. The possibility of dust trapping and grain growth causing the asymmetric structure was also investigated through the opacity index (beta) by plotting the observed SED slope between 0.87 mm from our SMA observation and 1.3 mm from literature. The results imply that grains are indistinguishable from ISM-like dust in the east side ($beta = 2.0 pm 0.5$), but much smaller in the west side $beta = 0.7^{+0.5}_{-0.4}$, indicating differential dust size distribution between the two sides of the disk. Combining the results of near-infrared and submillimeter observations, we conjecture that the spiral arms exist at the upper surface and an asymmetric structure resides in the disk interior. Future observations at centimeter wavelengths and differential polarization imaging in other bands (Y to K) with extreme AO imagers are required to understand how large dust grains form and to further explore the dust distribution in the disk.
  • We present a new Subaru/HiCIAO high-contrast H-band polarized intensity (PI) image of a nearby transitional disk associated with TW Hydrae. The scattered light from the disk was detected from 0.2" to 1.5" (11 - 81 AU) and the PI image shows a clear axisymmetric depression in polarized intensity at ~ 0.4" (~ 20 AU) from the central star, similar to the ~ 80 AU gap previously reported from HST images. Azimuthal polarized intensity profile also shows the disk beyond 0.2" is almost axisymmetric. We discuss two possible scenarios explaining the origin of the polarized intensity depression: 1) a gap structure may exist at ~ 20 AU from the central star because of shallow slope seen in the polarized intensity profile, and 2) grain growth may be occurring in the inner region of the disk. Multi-band observations at NIR and millimeter/sub-millimeter wavelengths play a complementary role in investigating dust opacity and may help reveal the origin of the gap more precisely.
  • We present Orion A giant molecular cloud core catalogs, which are based on 1.1 mm map with an angular resolution of 36 arcsec (sim 0.07 pc) and C18O (1-0) data with an angular resolution of 26.4 arcsec (sim 0.05 pc). We have cataloged 619 dust cores in the 1.1 mm map using the Clumpfind method. The ranges of the radius, mass, and density of these cores are estimated to be 0.01 - 0.20 pc, 0.6 - 1.2 times 10^2 Msun, and 0.3 times 10^4 - 9.2 times 10^6 cm^{-3}, respectively. We have identified 235 cores from the C18O data. The ranges of the radius, velocity width, LTE mass, and density are 0.13 -- 0.34 pc, 0.31 - 1.31 km s^{-1}, 1.0 - 61.8 Msun, and (0.8 - 17.5) times 10^3 cm^{-3}, respectively. From the comparison of the spatial distributions between the dust and C18O cores, four types of spatial relations were revealed: (1) the peak positions of the dust and C18O cores agree with each other (32.4% of the C18O cores), (2) two or more C18O cores are distributed around the peak position of one dust core (10.8% of the C18O cores), (3) 56.8% of the C18O cores are not associated with any dust cores, and (4) 69.3% of the dust cores are not associated with any C18O cores. The data sets and analysis are public.
  • We report high-resolution (0.07 arcsec) near-infrared polarized intensity images of the circumstellar disk around the star 2MASS J16042165-2130284 obtained with HiCIAO mounted on the Subaru 8.2 m telescope. We present our $H$-band data, which clearly exhibits a resolved, face-on disk with a large inner hole for the first time at infrared wavelengths. We detect the centrosymmetric polarization pattern in the circumstellar material as has been observed in other disks. Elliptical fitting gives the semimajor axis, semiminor axis, and position angle (P.A.) of the disk as 63 AU, 62 AU, and -14 $^{\circ}$, respectively. The disk is asymmetric, with one dip located at P.A.s of $\sim85^{\circ}$. Our observed disk size agrees well with a previous study of dust and CO emission at submillimeter wavelength with Submillimeter Array. Hence, the near-infrared light is interpreted as scattered light reflected from the inner edge of the disk. Our observations also detect an elongated arc (50 AU) extending over the disk inner hole. It emanates at the inner edge of the western side of the disk, extending inward first, then curving to the northeast. We discuss the possibility that the inner hole, the dip, and the arc that we have observed may be related to the existence of unseen bodies within the disk.
  • We present H-band polarimetric imagery of UX Tau A taken with HiCIAO/AO188 on the Subaru Telescope. UX Tau A has been classified as a pre-transitional disk object, with a gap structure separating its inner and outer disks. Our imagery taken with the 0.15 (21 AU) radius coronagraphic mask has revealed a strongly polarized circumstellar disk surrounding UX Tau A which extends to 120 AU, at a spatial resolution of 0.1 (14 AU). It is inclined by 46 \pm 2 degree as the west side is nearest. Although SED modeling and sub-millimeter imagery suggested the presence of a gap in the disk, with the inner edge of the outer disk estimated to be located at 25 - 30 AU, we detect no evidence of a gap at the limit of our inner working angle (23 AU) at the near-infrared wavelength. We attribute the observed strong polarization (up to 66 %) to light scattering by dust grains in the disk. However, neither polarization models of the circumstellar disk based on Rayleigh scattering nor Mie scattering approximations were consistent with the observed azimuthal profile of the polarization degrees of the disk. Instead, a geometric optics model of the disk with nonspherical grains with the radii of 30 micron meter is consistent with the observed profile. We suggest that the dust grains have experienced frequent collisional coagulations and have grown in the circumstellar disk of UX Tau A.
  • We present high-resolution, H-band, imaging observations, collected with Subaru/HiCIAO, of the scattered light from the transitional disk around SAO 206462 (HD 135344B). Although previous sub-mm imagery suggested the existence of the dust-depleted cavity at r~46AU, our observations reveal the presence of scattered light components as close as 0.2" (~28AU) from the star. Moreover, we have discovered two small-scale spiral structures lying within 0.5" (~70AU). We present models for the spiral structures using the spiral density wave theory, and derive a disk aspect ratio of h~0.1, which is consistent with previous sub-mm observations. This model can potentially give estimates of the temperature and rotation profiles of the disk based on dynamical processes, independently from sub-mm observations. It also predicts the evolution of the spiral structures, which can be observable on timescales of 10-20 years, providing conclusive tests of the model. While we cannot uniquely identify the origin of these spirals, planets embedded in the disk may be capable of exciting the observed morphology. Assuming that this is the case, we can make predictions on the locations and, possibly, the masses of the unseen planets. Such planets may be detected by future multi-wavelengths observations.
  • We report high-resolution 1.6 $\micron$ polarized intensity ($PI$) images of the circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star AB Aur at a radial distance of 22 AU ($0."15$) up to 554 AU (3.$"$85), which have been obtained by the high-contrast instrument HiCIAO with the dual-beam polarimetry. We revealed complicated and asymmetrical structures in the inner part ($\lesssim$140 AU) of the disk, while confirming the previously reported outer ($r$ $\gtrsim$200 AU) spiral structure. We have imaged a double ring structure at $\sim$40 and $\sim$100 AU and a ring-like gap between the two. We found a significant discrepancy of inclination angles between two rings, which may indicate that the disk of AB Aur is warped. Furthermore, we found seven dips (the typical size is $\sim$45 AU or less) within two rings as well as three prominent $PI$ peaks at $\sim$40 AU. The observed structures, including a bumpy double ring, a ring-like gap, and a warped disk in the innermost regions, provide essential information for understanding the formation mechanism of recently detected wide-orbit ($r$ $>$20 AU) planets.
  • We made mid-infrared observations of the 10Msun Herbig Be star HD200775 with the Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer (COMICS) on the 8.2m Subaru Telescope. We discovered diffuse emission of an elliptical shape extended in the north-south direction inabout 1000AU radius around unresolved excess emission. The diffuse emission is perpendicular to the cavity wall formed by the past outflow activity and is parallel to the projected major axis of the central close binary orbit. The centers of the ellipse contours of the diffuse emission are shifted from the stellar position and the amount of the shift increases as the contour brightness level decreases. The diffuse emission is well explained in all of geometry, size, and configuration by an inclined flared disk where only its surface emits the mid-infrared photons. Our results give the first well-resolved infrared disk images around a massive star and strongly support that HD200775 is formed through the disk accretion. The disk survives the main accretion phase and shows a structure similar to that around lower-mass stars with 'disk atmosphere'. At the same time, the disk also shows properties characteristic to massive stars such as photoevaporation traced by the 3.4mm free-free emission and unusual silicate emission with a peak at 9.2micron, which is shorter than that of many astronomical objects. It provides a good place to compare the disk properties between massive and lower-mass stars.
  • Using the OVRO, Nobeyama, and IRAM mm-arrays, we searched for ``disk''-outflow systems in three high-mass (proto)star forming regions: G16.59-0.05, G23.01-0.41, and G28.87+0.07. These were selected from a sample of NH3 cores associated with OH and H2O maser emission and with no or very faint continuum emission. Our imaging of molecular line (including rotational transitions of CH3CN and 3mm dust continuum emission revealed that these are compact, massive, and hot molecular cores (HMCs), that is likely sites of high-mass star formation prior to the appearance of UCHII regions. All three sources turn out to be associated with molecular outflows from CO and/or HCO+ J=1--0 line imaging. In addition, velocity gradients of 10 -- 100 km/s per pc in the innermost densest regions of the G23.01 and G28.87 HMCs are identified along directions roughly perpendicular to the axes of the corresponding outflows. All the results suggest that these cores might be rotating about the outflow axis, although the contribution of rotation to gravitational equilibrium of the HMCs appears to be negligible. Our analysis indicates that the 3 HMCs are close to virial equilibrium due to turbulent pressure support. Comparison with other similar objects where rotating toroids have been identified so far shows that in our case rotation appears to be much less prominent; this can be explained by the combined effect of unfavorable projection, large distance, and limited angular resolution with the current interferometers.
  • Using the Owens Valley and Nobeyama Radio Observatory interferometers, we carried out an unbiased search for hot molecular cores and ultracompact UC HII regions toward the high-mass star forming region G19.61--0.23. In addition, we performed 1.2 mm imaging with SIMBA, and retrieved 3.5 and 2 cm images from the VLA archive data base. The newly obtained 3 mm image brings information on a cluster of high-mass (proto)stars located in the innermost and densest part of the parsec scale clump detected in the 1.2 mm continuum. We identify a total of 10 high-mass young stellar objects: one hot core (HC) and 9 UC HII regions, whose physical parameters are obtained from model fits to their continuum spectra. The ratio between the current and expected final radii of the UC \HII regions ranges from 0.3 to 0.9, which leaves the possibility that all O-B stars formed simultaneously. Under the opposite assumption -- namely that star formation occurred randomly -- we estimate that HC lifetime is less than $\sim$1/3 of that of UCHII regions on the basis of the source number ratio between them.
  • We present sub-arcsecond (FWHM ~ 0".7), NIR JHKs-band images and a high sensitivity radio continuum image at 1280 MHz, using SIRIUS on UH 88-inch telescope and GMRT. The NIR survey covers an area of ~ 24 arcmin^2 with 10-sigma limiting mags of ~ 19.5, 18.4, and 17.3 in J, H, and Ks-band, respectively. Our NIR images are deeper than any JHK surveys to date for the larger area of NGC 7538 star forming region. We construct JHK CC and J-H/J and H-K/K CM diagrams to identify YSOs and to estimate their masses. Based on these CC and CM diagrams, we identified a rich population of YSOs (Class I and Class II), associated with the NGC 7538 region. A large number of red sources (H-K > 2) have also been detected around NGC 7538. We argue that these red stars are most probably PMS stars with intrinsic color excesses. Most of YSOs in NGC 7538 are arranged from the N-W toward S-E regions, forming a sequence in age: the diffuse H II region (N-W, oldest: where most of the Class II and Class I sources are detected); the compact IR core (center); and the regions with the extensive IR reflection nebula and a cluster of red young stars (S-E and S). We find that the slope of the KLF of NGC 7538 is lower than the typical values reported for the young embedded clusters, although equally low values have also been reported in the W3 Main star forming region. From the slope of the KLF and the analysis by Megeath et al. (1996), we infer that the embedded stellar population is comprised of YSOs with an age of ~ 1 Myr. Based on the comparison between models of PMS stars with the observed CM diagram we find that the stellar population in NGC 7538 is primarily composed of low mass PMS stars similar to those observed in the W3 Main star forming region.
  • We have conducted multi-epoch synthesis imaging of 2 and 3 millimeter (mm) continuum emission and near infrared K band 2.2 um imaging of a flare event in January 2003 that occurred on the young stellar object GMR-A which is suggested to be a weak-line T Tauri star in the Orion cluster. Our mm data showed that the flare activity lasted at least over 13 days, whereas the K-band magnitude did not change during this event. In addition, we have succeeded in detecting short time variations of flux on the time scales of 15 minutes. The total energy of the flare is estimated to be 10^{35-36} erg, which makes it one of the most energetic flares reported to date. Comparing the mm continuum luminosities with reported X-ray luminosities, we conclude that the mm flare was similar in nature to solar and other stellar flares. Our results will be a crucial step toward understanding magnetically induced stellar surface activities in T Tauri stars.
  • High angular resolution and sensitive aperture synthesis observations of CS ($J=2-1$) and CS ($J=3-2$) emissions toward L1551 NE, the second brightest protostar in the Taurus Molecular Cloud, made with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array are presented. L1551 NE is categorized as a class 0 object deeply embedded in the red-shifted outflow lobe of L1551 IRS 5. Previous studies of the L1551 NE region in CS emission revealed the presence of shell-like components open toward L1551 IRS 5, which seem to trace low-velocity shocks in the swept-up shell driven by the outflow from L1551 IRS 5. In this study, significant CS emission around L1551 NE was detected at the eastern tip of the swept-up shell from $V_{\rm{lsr}}$ = 5.3 km s$^{-1}$ to 10.1 km s$^{-1}$, and the total mass of the dense gas is estimated to be 0.18 $\pm$ 0.02 $M_\odot$. Additionally, the following new structures were successfully revealed: a compact disklike component with a size of $\approx$ 1000 AU just at L1551 NE, an arc-shaped structure around L1551 NE, open toward L1551 NE, with a size of $\sim 5000$ AU, i.e., a bow shock, and a distinct velocity gradient of the dense gas, i.e., deceleration along the outflow axis of L1551 IRS 5. These features suggest that the CS emission traces the post-shocked region where the dense gas associated with L1551 NE and the swept-up shell of the outflow from L1551 IRS 5 interact. Since the age of L1551 NE is comparable to the timescale of the interaction, it is plausible that the formation of L1551 NE was induced by the outflow impact. The compact structure of L1551 NE with a tiny envelope was also revealed, suggesting that the outer envelope of L1551 NE has been blown off by the outflow from L1551 IRS 5.
  • A polarimeter has been built for use with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA), on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) in Hawaii. SCUBA is the first of a new generation of highly sensitive submillimetre cameras, and the UK/Japan Polarimeter adds a polarimetric imaging/photometry capability in the wavelength range 350 to 2000 microns. Early science results range from measuring the synchrotron polarization of the black hole candidate Sgr A* to mapping magnetic fields inferred from polarized dust emission in Galactic star-forming clouds. We describe the instrument design, performance, observing techniques and data reduction processes, along with an assessment of the current and future scientific capability.
  • Imaging polarimetry of the 0.85mm continuum emission in the NGC 7538 region, obtained with the SCUBA Polarimeter, is presented. The polarization map is interpreted in terms of thermal radiation by magnetically aligned dust grains. Two prominent cores associated with IRS 1 and IRS 11, IRS 1(SMM) and IRS 11(SMM), are found in the surface brightness map. Although these cores look similar in surface brightness, their polarization shows striking differences. In IRS 11(SMM), the polarization vectors are extremely well ordered, and the degrees of polarization are quite high with an average of ~3.9 %. In IRS 1(SMM), on the other hand, the directions of polarization vectors are locally disturbed, and the degrees of polarization are much lower than those of IRS 11(SMM). These differences suggest that small scale fluctuations of the magnetic field are more prominent in IRS 1(SMM). This can be interpreted in terms of the difference in evolutionary stage of the cores. Inside IRS 1(SMM), which seems to be at a later evolutionary stage than IRS 11(SMM), substructures such as subclumps or a cluster of infrared sources have already formed. Small scale fluctuations in the magnetic field could have developed during the formation of these substructures. The distribution of magnetic field directions derived from our polarization map agrees well with those of molecular outflows associated with IRS 1(SMM) and IRS 11(SMM). Comparisons of energy densities between the magnetic field and the outflows show that the magnetic field probably plays an important role in guiding the directions of the outflows.