• The lack of inversion symmetry in the crystal lattice of magnetic materials gives rise to complex non-collinear spin orders through interactions of relativistic nature, resulting in interesting physical phenomena, such as emergent electromagnetism. Studies of cubic chiral magnets revealed a universal magnetic phase diagram, composed of helical spiral, conical spiral and skyrmion crystal phases. Here, we report a remarkable deviation from this universal behavior. By combining neutron diffraction with magnetization measurements we observe a new multi-domain state in Cu2OSeO3. Just below the upper critical field at which the conical spiral state disappears, the spiral wave vector rotates away from the magnetic field direction. This transition gives rise to large magnetic fluctuations. We clarify physical origin of the new state and discuss its multiferroic properties.
  • We study topological defects in anisotropic ferromagnets with competing interactions near the Lifshitz point. We show that skyrmions and bi-merons are stable in a large part of the phase diagram. We calculate skyrmion-skyrmion and meron-meron interactions and show that skyrmions attract each other and form ring-shaped bound states in a zero magnetic field. At the Lifshitz point merons carrying a fractional topological charge become deconfined. These results imply that unusual topological excitations may exist in weakly frustrated magnets with conventional crystal lattices.
  • The tetragonal copper oxide Bi$_2$CuO$_4$ has an unusual crystal structure with a three-dimensional network of well separated CuO$_4$ plaquettes. This material was recently predicted to host electronic excitations with an unconventional spectrum and the spin structure of its magnetically ordered state appearing at T$_N$ $\sim$43 K remains controversial. Here we present the results of detailed studies of specific heat, magnetic and dielectric properties of Bi$_2$CuO$_4$ single crystals grown by the floating zone technique, combined with the polarized neutron scattering and high-resolution X-ray measurements. Our polarized neutron scattering data show Cu spins are parallel to the $ab$ plane. Below the onset of the long range antiferromagnetic ordering we observe an electric polarization induced by an applied magnetic field, which indicates inversion symmetry breaking by the ordered state of Cu spins. For the magnetic field applied perpendicular to the tetragonal axis, the spin-induced ferroelectricity is explained in terms of the linear magnetoelectric effect that occurs in a metastable magnetic state. A relatively small electric polarization induced by the field parallel to the tetragonal axis may indicate a more complex magnetic ordering in Bi$_2$CuO$_4$.
  • The interaction between the itinerant spins in metals and localized spins in magnetic insulators thus far has only been explored in collinear spin systems, such as garnets. Here, we report the spin-Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) sensitive to the surface magnetization of the spin-spiral material, Cu_2OSeO_3. We experimentally demonstrate that the angular dependence of the SMR changes drastically at the transition between the helical spiral and the conical spiral phases. Furthermore, the sign and magnitude of the SMR in the conical spiral state are controlled by the cone angle. We show that this complex behaviour can be qualitatively explained within the SMR theory initially developed for collinear magnets. In addition, we studied the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), which is sensitive to the bulk magnetization. It originates from the conversion of thermally excited low-energy spin waves in the magnet, known as magnons, into the spin current in the adjacent metal contact (Pt). The SSE displays unconventional behavior where not only the magnitude but also the phase of the SSE vary with the applied magnetic field.
  • Magnetic skyrmions are particle-like topological excitations recently discovered in chiral magnets. Their small size, topological protection and the ease with which they can be manipulated by electric currents generated much interest in using skyrmions for information storage and processing. Recently, it was suggested that skyrmions with additional degrees of freedom can exist in magnetically frustrated materials. Here, we show that dynamics of skyrmions and antiskyrmions in nanostripes of frustrated magnets is strongly affected by complex spin states formed at the stripe edges. These states create multiple edge channels which guide the skyrmion motion. Non-trivial topology of edge states gives rise to complex current-induced dynamics, such as emission of skyrmion-antiskyrmion pairs. The edge state topology can be controlled with an electric current through the exchange of skyrmions and antiskyrmions between the edges of a magnetic nanostructure. These results can lead to conceptually new electronic devices.
  • Spontaneously emergent chirality is an issue of fundamental importance across the natural sciences. It has been argued that a unidirectional (chiral) rotation of a mechanical ratchet is forbidden in thermal equilibrium, but becomes possible in systems out of equilibrium. Here we report our finding that a topologically nontrivial spin texture known as a skyrmion - a particle-like object in which spins point in all directions to wrap a sphere - constitutes such a ratchet. By means of Lorentz transmission electron microscopy we show that micron-sized crystals of skyrmions in thin films of Cu2OSeO3 and MnSi display a unidirectional rotation motion. Our numerical simulations based on a stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation suggest that this rotation is driven solely by thermal fluctuations in the presence of a temperature gradient, whereas in thermal equilibrium it is forbidden by the Bohr-van Leeuwen theorem. We show that the rotational flow of magnons driven by the effective magnetic field of skyrmions gives rise to the skyrmion rotation, therefore suggesting that magnons can be used to control the motion of these spin textures.
  • Multiply periodic states appear in a wide variety of physical contexts, such as the Rayleigh-Benard convection, Faraday waves, liquid crystals, domain patterns in ferromagnetic films and skyrmion crystals recently observed in chiral magnets. Here we study a simple model of an anisotropic frustrated magnet and show that its zero-temperature phase diagram contains numerous multi-q states including the skyrmion crystal. We clarify the mechanism for stabilization of these states, discuss their multiferroic properties and formulate rules for finding new skyrmion materials. In addition to skyrmion crystal, we find stable isolated skyrmions with topological charge 1 and 2. Physics of isolated skyrmions in frustrated magnets is very rich. Their statical and dynamical properties are strongly affected by the new zero mode - skyrmion helicity.
  • In bulk non-centrosymmetric magnets the chiral Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange stabilizes tubular skyrmions with a reversed magnetization in their centers. While the double-twist is favorable in the center of a skyrmion, it gives rise to an excess of the energy density at the outskirt. Therefore, magnetic anisotropies are required to make skyrmions more favorable than the conical spiral state in bulk materials. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we show that in magnetic nanowires unusual skyrmions with a doubly twisted core and a number of concentric helicoidal undulations (target-skyrmions) are thermodynamically stable even in absence of single-ion anisotropies. Such skyrmions are free of magnetic charges and, since the angle describing the direction of magnetization at the surface depends on the radius of the nanowire and an applied magnetic field, they carry a non-integer skyrmion charge s > 1. This state competes with clusters of spatially separated s=1 skyrmions. For very small radii, the target-skyrmion transforms into a skyrmion with s < 1, that resembles the vortex-like state stabilized by surface-induced anisotropies.
  • How the magnetoelectric coupling actually occurs on a microscopic level in multiferroic BiFeO3 is not well known. By using the high-resolution single crystal neutron diffraction techniques, we have determined the electric polarization of each individual elements of BiFeO3, and concluded that the magnetostrictive coupling suppresses the electric polarization at the Fe site below TN. This negative magnetoelectric coupling appears to outweigh the spin current contributions arising from the cycloid spin structure, which should produce a positive magnetoelectric coupling.
  • We studied magnetic excitations in a low-temperature ferroelectric phase of the multiferroic YMn2O5 using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). We identify low-energy magnon modes and establish a correspondence between the magnon peaks observed by INS and electromagnon peaks observed in optical absorption [1]. Furthermore, we explain the microscopic mechanism, which results in the lowest-energy electromagnon peak, by comparing the inelastic neutron spectral weight with the polarization in the commensurate ferroelectric phase.
  • We show that strong electromagnon peaks can be found in absorption spectra of non-collinear magnets exhibiting a linear magnetoelectric effect. The frequencies of these peaks coincide with the frequencies of antiferromagnetic resonances and the ratio of the spectral weights of the electromagnon and antiferromagnetic resonance is related to the ratio of the static magnetoelectric constant and magnetic susceptibility. Using a Kagome lattice antiferromagnet as an example, we show that frustration of spin ordering gives rise to magnetoelastic instabilities at strong spin-lattice coupling, which transform a non-collinear magnetoelectric spin state into a collinear multiferroic state with a spontaneous electric polarization and magnetization. The Kagome lattice antiferromagnet also shows a ferroelectric incommensurate-spiral phase, where polarization is induced by the exchange striction mechanism.
  • The origin of electromagnon excitations in cycloidal \textit{R}MnO$_3$ is explained in terms of the Heisenberg coupling between spins despite the fact that the static polarization arises from the much weaker Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) exchange interaction. We present a model that incorporates structural characteristics of this family of manganites that is confirmed by far infrared transmission data as a function of temperature and magnetic field and inelastic neutron scattering results. A deep connection is found between the magnetoelectric dynamics of the spiral phase and the static magnetoelectric coupling in the collinear E-phase of this family of manganites.
  • We observe a seemingly complex magnetic field dependence of dielectric constant of hexagonal YbMnO3 near the spin ordering temperature. After rescaling, the data taken at different temperatures and magnetic fields collapse on a single curve describing the sharp anomaly in nonlinear magnetoelectric response at the magnetic transition. We show that this anomaly is a result of the competition between two magnetic phases. The scaling and the shape of the anomaly are explained using the phenomenological Landau description of the competing phases in hexagonal manganites.
  • We summarize the existing experimental data on electromagnons in multiferroic RMn2O5 compounds, where R denotes a rare earth ion, Y or Bi, and discuss a realistic microscopic model of these materials based on assumption that the microscopic mechanism of magnetically-induced ferroelectricity and electromagnon absorption relies entirely on the isotropic Heisenberg exchange and magnetostrictive coupling of spins to a polar lattice mode and does not involve relativistic effects. This model explains many magnetic and optical properties of RMn2O5 manganites, such as the spin re-orientation transition, magnetically-induced polarisation, appearance of the electromagnon peak in the non-collinear spin state and the polarisation of light for which this peak is observed. We compare experimental and theoretical results on electromagnons in RMn2O5 and RMnO3 compounds.
  • The standard view is that at low energies Mott insulators exhibit only magnetic properties while charge degrees of freedom are frozen out as the electrons become localized by a strong Coulomb repulsion. We demonstrate that this is in general not true: for certain spin textures {\it spontaneous circular electric currents} or {\it nonuniform charge distribution} exist in the ground state of Mott insulators. In addition, low-energy ``magnetic'' states contribute comparably to the dielectric and magnetic functions $\epsilon_{ik}(\omega)$ and $\mu_{ik}(\omega)$ leading to interesting phenomena such as rotation the electric field polarization and resonances which may be common for both functions producing a negative refraction index in a window of frequencies.
  • We report on diffraction measurements on multiferroic TbMnO3 which demonstrate that the Tb- and Mn-magnetic orders are coupled below the ferroelectric transition TFE = 28 K. For T < TFE the magnetic propagation vectors (tau) for Tb and Mn are locked so that tauTb = tauMn, while below TNTb = 7 K we find that tauTb and tauMn lock-in to rational values of 3/7 b* and 2/7 b*, respectively, and obey the relation 3tauTb - tauMn = 1. We explain this novel matching of wave vectors within the frustrated ANNNI model coupled to a periodic external field produced by the Mn-spin order. The tauTb = tauMn behavior is recovered when Tb magnetization is small, while the tauTb = 3/7 regime is stabilized at low temperatures by a peculiar arrangement of domain walls in the ordered state of Ising-like Tb spins.
  • Ferroelectric spiral magnets DyMnO3 and TbMnO3 show similar behavior of electric polarization in applied magnetic fields. Studies of the field dependence of lattice modulations on the contrary show a completely different picture. Whereas in TbMnO3 the polarization flop from P||c to P||a is accompanied by a sudden change from incommensurate to commensurate wave vector modulation, in DyMnO3 the wave vector varies continuously through the flop transition. This smooth behavior may be related to the giant magnetocapacitive effect observed in DyMnO3.
  • Photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy has revealed a novel, highly efficient two-photon excitation method to produce a cold, uniformly distributed high density excitonic gas in bulk cuprous oxide. A study of the time evolution of the density, temperature and chemical potential of the exciton gas shows that the so called quantum saturation effect that prevents Bose-Einstein condensation of the ortho-exciton gas originates from an unfavorable ratio between the cooling and recombination rates. Oscillations observed in the temporal decay of the ortho-excitonic luminescence intensity are discussed in terms of polaritonic beating. We present the semiclassical description of polaritonic oscillations in linear and non-linear optical processes.
  • Temperature dependent optical spectra are reported for beta-Na0.33V2O5. The sodium ordering transition at T_Na = 240 K, and in particular the charge ordering transition at T_MI = 136 K strongly influence the optical spectra. The metal-insulator transition at \tmi leads to the opening of a psuedogap (\hbar\omega = 1700 cm-1), and to the appearance of a large number of optical phonons. These observations, and the presence of a mid-infrared band (typical for low dimensional metals) strongly suggests that the charge carriers in beta-Na0.33V2O5 are small polarons.
  • We study the (spin-)Peierls transition in quasi-one-dimensional disordered systems, treating the lattice classically. The role of kinks, induced thermally and by disorder, is emphasized. For weak interchain interaction the kinks destroy the coherence between different chains at a temperature significantly lower than the mean-field Peierls transition temperature. We formulate the effective Ising model, which describes such a transition, investigate the doping dependence of the (spin-)Peierls transition temperature and discuss several implications of the picture developed. The results are compared with the properties of the spin-Peierls system CuGeO_3.
  • The microscopic description of the spin-Peierls transition in pure and doped CuGeO_3 is developed taking into account realistic details of crystal structure. It it shown that the presence of side-groups (here Ge) strongly influences superexchange along Cu-O-Cu path, making it antiferromagnetic. Nearest-neighbour and next-nearest neighbour exchange constants $J_{nn}$ and $J_{nnn}$ are calculated. Si doping effectively segments the CuO_2-chains leading to $J_{nn}(Si)\simeq0$ or even slightly ferromagnetic. Strong sensitivity of the exchange constants to Cu-O-Cu and (Cu-O-Cu)-Ge angles may be responsible for the spin-Peierls transition itself (``bond-bending mechanism'' of the transition). The nature of excitations in the isolated and coupled spin-Peierls chains is studied and it is shown that topological excitations (solitons) play crucial role. Such solitons appear in particular in doped systems (Cu_{1-x}Zn_xGeO_3, CuGe_{1-x}Si_xO_3) which can explain the $T_{SP}(x)$ phase diagram.