• We extend profile domain pulsar timing to incorporate wide-band effects such as frequency-dependent profile evolution and broadband shape variation in the pulse profile. We also incorporate models for temporal variations in both pulse width and in the separation in phase of the main pulse and interpulse. We perform the analysis with both nested sampling and Hamiltonian Monte Carlo methods. In the latter case we introduce a new parameterisation of the posterior that is extremely efficient in the low signal-to-noise regime and can be readily applied to a wide range of scientific problems. We apply this methodology to a series of simulations, and to between seven and nine yr of observations for PSRs J1713$+$0747, J1744$-$1134, and J1909$-$3744 with frequency coverage that spans 700-3600MHz. We use a smooth model for profile evolution across the full frequency range, and compare smooth and piecewise models for the temporal variations in DM. We find the profile domain framework consistently results in improved timing precision compared to the standard analysis paradigm by as much as 40% for timing parameters. Incorporating smoothness in the DM variations into the model further improves timing precision by as much as 30%. For PSR J1713+0747 we also detect pulse shape variation uncorrelated between epochs, which we attribute to variation intrinsic to the pulsar at a level consistent with previously published analyses. Not accounting for this shape variation biases the measured arrival times at the level of $\sim$30ns, the same order of magnitude as the expected shift due to gravitational-waves in the pulsar timing band.
  • We present the results of the most complete ever scan of the parameter space for cosmic ray (CR) injection and propagation. We perform a Bayesian search of the main GALPROP parameters, using the MultiNest nested sampling algorithm, augmented by the BAMBI neural network machine learning package. This is the first such study to separate out low-mass isotopes ($p$, $\bar p$ and He) from the usual light elements (Be, B, C, N, O). We find that the propagation parameters that best fit $p$, $\bar p$, He data are significantly different from those that fit light elements, including the B/C and $^{10}$Be/$^9$Be secondary-to-primary ratios normally used to calibrate propagation parameters. This suggests each set of species is probing a very different interstellar medium, and that the standard approach of calibrating propagation parameters using B/C can lead to incorrect results. We present posterior distributions and best fit parameters for propagation of both sets of nuclei, as well as for the injection abundances of elements from H to Si. The input GALDEF files with these new parameters will be included in an upcoming public GALPROP update.
  • We present observations and analysis of a sample of 123 galaxy clusters from the 2013 Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich sources with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI), a ground-based radio interferometer. AMI provides an independent measurement with higher angular resolution, 3 arcmin compared to the Planck beams of 5-10 arcmin. The AMI observations thus provide validation of the cluster detections, improved positional estimates, and a consistency check on the fitted 'size' ($\theta_{s}$) and 'flux' ($Y_{\rm tot}$) parameters in the Generalised Navarro, Frenk and White (GNFW) model. We detect 99 of the clusters. We use the AMI positional estimates to check the positional estimates and error-bars produced by the Planck algorithms PowellSnakes and MMF3. We find that $Y_{\rm tot}$ values as measured by AMI are biased downwards with respect to the Planck constraints, especially for high Planck-SNR clusters. We perform simulations to show that this can be explained by deviation from the 'universal' pressure profile shape used to model the clusters. We show that AMI data can constrain the $\alpha$ and $\beta$ parameters describing the shape of the profile in the GNFW model for individual clusters provided careful attention is paid to the degeneracies between parameters, but one requires information on a wider range of angular scales than are present in AMI data alone to correctly constrain all parameters simultaneously.
  • A new Bayesian method for the analysis of folded pulsar timing data is presented that allows for the simultaneous evaluation of evolution in the pulse profile in either frequency or time, along with the timing model and additional stochastic processes such as red spin noise, or dispersion measure variations. We model the pulse profiles using `shapelets' - a complete ortho-normal set of basis functions that allow us to recreate any physical profile shape. Any evolution in the profiles can then be described as either an arbitrary number of independent profiles, or using some functional form. We perform simulations to compare this approach with established methods for pulsar timing analysis, and to demonstrate model selection between different evolutionary scenarios using the Bayesian evidence. %s The simplicity of our method allows for many possible extensions, such as including models for correlated noise in the pulse profile, or broadening of the pulse profiles due to scattering. As such, while it is a marked departure from standard pulsar timing analysis methods, it has clear applications for both new and current datasets, such as those from the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) and International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA).
  • We present the first public release of our Bayesian inference tool, Bayes-X, for the analysis of X-ray observations of galaxy clusters. We illustrate the use of Bayes-X by analysing a set of four simulated clusters at z=0.2-0.9 as they would be observed by a Chandra-like X-ray observatory. In both the simulations and the analysis pipeline we assume that the dark matter density follows a spherically-symmetric Navarro, Frenk and White (NFW) profile and that the gas pressure is described by a generalised NFW (GNFW) profile. We then perform four sets of analyses. By numerically exploring the joint probability distribution of the cluster parameters given simulated Chandra-like data, we show that the model and analysis technique can robustly return the simulated cluster input quantities, constrain the cluster physical parameters and reveal the degeneracies among the model parameters and cluster physical parameters. We then analyse Chandra data on the nearby cluster, A262, and derive the cluster physical profiles. To illustrate the performance of the Bayesian model selection, we also carried out analyses assuming an Einasto profile for the matter density and calculated the Bayes factor. The results of the model selection analyses for the simulated data favour the NFW model as expected. However, we find that the Einasto profile is preferred in the analysis of A262. The Bayes-X software, which is implemented in Fortran 90, is available at http://www.mrao.cam.ac.uk/facilities/software/bayesx/.
  • A hierarchical Bayesian method is applied to the analysis of Type-Ia supernovae (SNIa) observations to constrain the properties of the dark matter haloes of galaxies along the SNIa lines-of-sight via their gravitational lensing effect. The full joint posterior distribution of the dark matter halo parameters is explored using the nested sampling algorithm {\sc MultiNest}, which also efficiently calculates the Bayesian evidence, thereby facilitating robust model comparison. We first demonstrate the capabilities of the method by applying it to realistic simulated SNIa data, based on the real 3-year data release from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3). Assuming typical values for the halo parameters in our simulations, we find that a catalogue analogous to the existing SNLS3 data set is incapable of detecting the lensing signal, but a catalogue containing approximately three times as many SNIa does produce robust and accurate parameter constraints and model selection results for two halo models: a truncated singular isothermal sphere (SIS) and a Navarro--Frenk--White (NFW) profile, thereby validating our analysis methodology. In the analysis of the real SNLS3 data, contrary to previous studies, we obtain only a very marginal detection of a lensing signal and weak constraints on the halo parameters for the truncated SIS model, although these constraints are tighter than those obtained from the equivalent simulated SNIa data set. This difference is driven by a preferred value of $\eta \approx 1$ in the assumed scaling-law $\sigma \propto L^\eta$ between velocity dispersion and luminosity, which is somewhat higher than the canonical values of $\eta = \tfrac{1}{4}$ and $\eta = \tfrac{1}{3}$ for early and late-type galaxies, respectively, and leads to a stronger lensing effect by the halo. No detection of a lensing signal is made for the NFW model.
  • A method is presented for automated photometric classification of supernovae (SNe) as Type-Ia or non-Ia. A two-step approach is adopted in which: (i) the SN lightcurve flux measurements in each observing filter are fitted separately; and (ii) the fitted function parameters and their associated uncertainties, along with the number of flux measurements, the maximum-likelihood value of the fit and Bayesian evidence for the model, are used as the input feature vector to a classification neural network (NN) that outputs the probability that the SN under consideration is of Type-Ia. The method is trained and tested using data released following the SuperNova Photometric Classification Challenge (SNPCC). We consider several random divisions of the data into training and testing sets: for instance, for our sample D_1 (D_4), a total of 10% (40%) of the data are involved in training the algorithm and the remainder used for blind testing of the resulting classifier; we make no selection cuts. Assigning a canonical threshold probability of p_th=0.5 on the NN output to classify a SN as Type-Ia, for the sample D_1 (D_4) we obtain a completeness of 0.78 (0.82), purity of 0.77 (0.82), and SNPCC figure-of-merit of 0.41 (0.50). Including the SN host-galaxy redshift and its uncertainty as additional inputs to the NN results in a modest 5-10% increase in these values. We find that the classification quality does not vary significantly with SN redshift. Moreover, our probabilistic classification method allows one to calculate the expected completeness, purity or other measures of classification quality as a function of the p_th, without knowing the true classes of the SNe in the testing sample. The method may thus be improved further by optimising p_th and can easily be extended to divide non-Ia SNe into their different classes.
  • The current concordance model of cosmology is dominated by two mysterious ingredients: dark matter and dark energy. In this paper, we explore the possibility that, in fact, there exist two dark-energy components: the cosmological constant $\Lambda$, with equation-of-state parameter $w_\Lambda=-1$, and a `missing matter' component $X$ with $w_X=-2/3$, which we introduce here to allow the evolution of the universal scale factor as a function of conformal time to exhibit a symmetry that relates the big bang to the future conformal singularity, such as in Penrose's conformal cyclic cosmology. Using recent cosmological observations, we constrain the present-day energy density of missing matter to be $\Omega_{X,0}=-0.034 \pm 0.075$. This is consistent with the standard $\Lambda$CDM model, but constraints on the energy densities of all the components are considerably broadened by the introduction of missing matter; significant relative probability exists even for $\Omega_{X,0} \sim 0.1$, and so the presence of a missing matter component cannot be ruled out. As a result, a Bayesian model selection analysis only slightly disfavours its introduction by 1.1 log-units of evidence. Foregoing our symmetry requirement on the conformal time evolution of the universe, we extend our analysis by allowing $w_X$ to be a free parameter. For this more generic `double dark energy' model, we find $w_X = -1.01 \pm 0.16$ and $\Omega_{X,0} = -0.10 \pm 0.56$, which is again consistent with the standard $\Lambda$CDM model, although once more the posterior distributions are sufficiently broad that the existence of a second dark-energy component cannot be ruled out. The model including the second dark energy component also has an equivalent Bayesian evidence to $\Lambda$CDM, within the estimation error, and is indistinguishable according to the Jeffreys guideline.
  • We present a comparison of two methods for cosmological parameter inference from supernovae Ia lightcurves fitted with the SALT2 technique. The standard chi-square methodology and the recently proposed Bayesian hierarchical method (BHM) are each applied to identical sets of simulations based on the 3-year data release from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3), and also data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Low Redshift sample and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), assuming a concordance LCDM cosmology. For both methods, we find that the recovered values of the cosmological parameters, and the global nuisance parameters controlling the stretch and colour corrections to the supernovae lightcurves, suffer from small biasses. The magnitude of the biasses is similar in both cases, with the BHM yielding slightly more accurate results, in particular for cosmological parameters when applied to just the SNLS3 single survey data sets. Most notably, in this case, the biasses in the recovered matter density $\Omega_{\rm m,0}$ are in opposite directions for the two methods. For any given realisation of the SNLS3-type data, this can result in a $\sim 2 \sigma$ discrepancy in the estimated value of $\Omega_{\rm m,0}$ between the two methods, which we find to be the case for real SNLS3 data. As more higher and lower redshift SNIa samples are included, however, the cosmological parameter estimates of the two methods converge.
  • Following on our previous study of an analytic parametric model to describe the baryonic and dark matter distributions in clusters of galaxies with spherical symmetry, we perform an SZ analysis of a set of simulated clusters and present their mass and pressure profiles. The simulated clusters span a wide range in mass, 2.0 x 10^14 Msun < M200 < 1.0 x 10^15Msun, and observations with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) are simulated through their Sunyaev- Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We assume that the dark matter density follows a Navarro, Frenk and White (NFW) profile and that the gas pressure is described by a generalised NFW (GNFW) profile. By numerically exploring the probability distributions of the cluster parameters given simulated interferometric SZ data in the context of Bayesian methods, we investigate the capability of this model and analysis technique to return the simulated clusters input quantities. We show that considering the mass and redshift dependency of the cluster halo concentration parameter is crucial in obtaining an unbiased cluster mass estimate and hence deriving the radial profiles of the enclosed total mass and the gas pressure out to r200.
  • We present an analytic parametric model to describe the baryonic and dark matter distributions in clusters of galaxies with spherical symmetry. It is assumed that the dark matter density follows a Navarro, Frenk and White (NFW) profile and that the gas pressure is described by a generalised NFW (GNFW) profile. By further demanding hydrostatic equilibrium and that the gas fraction is small throughout the cluster, one obtains unique functional forms, dependent on basic cluster parameters, for the radial profiles of all the properties of interest in the cluster. We show these profiles are consistent both with numerical simulations and multi-wavelength observations of clusters. We also use our model to analyse six simulated SZ clusters as well as A611 SZ data from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI). In each case, we derive the radial profile of the enclosed total mass and the gas pressure and show that the results are in good agreement with our model prediction.
  • We present an interesting Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) detection in the first of the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) 'blind', degree-square fields to have been observed down to our target sensitivity of 100{\mu}Jy/beam. In follow-up deep pointed observations the SZ effect is detected with a maximum peak decrement greater than 8 \times the thermal noise. No corresponding emission is visible in the ROSAT all-sky X-ray survey and no cluster is evident in the Palomar all-sky optical survey. Compared with existing SZ images of distant clusters, the extent is large (\approx 10') and complex; our analysis favours a model containing two clusters rather than a single cluster. Our Bayesian analysis is currently limited to modelling each cluster with an ellipsoidal or spherical beta-model, which do not do justice to this decrement. Fitting an ellipsoid to the deeper candidate we find the following. (a) Assuming that the Evrard et al. (2002) approximation to Press & Schechter (1974) correctly gives the number density of clusters as a function of mass and redshift, then, in the search area, the formal Bayesian probability ratio of the AMI detection of this cluster is 7.9 \times 10^4:1; alternatively assuming Jenkins et al. (2001) as the true prior, the formal Bayesian probability ratio of detection is 2.1 \times 10^5:1. (b) The cluster mass is MT,200 = 5.5+1.2\times 10^14h-1M\odot. (c) Abandoning a physical model with num- -1.3 70 ber density prior and instead simply modelling the SZ decrement using a phenomenological {\beta}-model of temperature decrement as a function of angular distance, we find a central SZ temperature decrement of -295+36 {\mu}K - this allows for CMB primary anisotropies, receiver -15 noise and radio sources. We are unsure if the cluster system we observe is a merging system or two separate clusters.
  • Powellsnakes is a Bayesian algorithm for detecting compact objects embedded in a diffuse background, and was selected and successfully employed by the Planck consortium in the production of its first public deliverable: the Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC). We present the critical foundations and main directions of further development of PwS, which extend it in terms of formal correctness and the optimal use of all the available information in a consistent unified framework, where no distinction is made between point sources (unresolved objects), SZ clusters, single or multi-channel detection. An emphasis is placed on the necessity of a multi-frequency, multi-model detection algorithm in order to achieve optimality.
  • We present results of a Bayesian analysis of radial velocity (RV) data for the star HIP 5158, confirming the presence of two companions and also constraining their orbital parameters. Assuming Keplerian orbits, the two-companion model is found to be e^{48} times more probable than the one-planet model, although the orbital parameters of the second companion are only weakly constrained. The derived orbital periods are 345.6 +/- 2.0 d and 9017.8 +/- 3180.7 d respectively, and the corresponding eccentricities are 0.54 +/- 0.04 and 0.14 +/- 0.10. The limits on planetary mass (m \sin i) and semimajor axis are (1.44 +/- 0.14 M_{J}, 0.89 +/- 0.01 AU) and (15.04 +/- 10.55 M_{J}, 7.70 +/- 1.88 AU) respectively. Owing to large uncertainty on the mass of the second companion, we are unable to determine whether it is a planet or a brown dwarf. The remaining `noise' (stellar jitter) unaccounted for by the model is 2.28 +/- 0.31 m/s. We also analysed a three-companion model, but found it to be e^{8} times less probable than the two-companion model.
  • We present constraints on the non-linear coupling parameter fnl with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data. We use the method based on the spherical Mexican hat wavelet (SMHW) to measure the fnl parameter for three of the most interesting shapes of primordial non-Gaussianity: local, equilateral and orthogonal. Our results indicate that this parameter is compatible with a Gaussian distribution within the two sigma confidence level (CL) for the three shapes and the results are consistent with the values presented by the WMAP team. We have included in our analysis the impact on fnl due to contamination by unresolved point sources. The point sources add a positive contribution of Delta(fnl) = 2.5 \pm 3.0, Delta(fnl) = 37 \pm 18 and Delta(fnl) = 25 \pm 14 for the local, equilateral and orthogonal cases respectively. As mentioned by the WMAP team, the contribution of the point sources to the orthogonal and equilateral form is expected to be larger than the local one and thus it cannot be neglected in future constraints on these parameters. Taking into account this contamination, our best estimates for fnl are -16.0 \leq fnl \leq 76.0, -382 \leq fnl \leq 202 and -394 \leq fnl \leq 34 at 95% CL for the local, equilateral and orthogonal cases respectively. The three shapes are compatible with zero at 95% CL (2{\sigma}). Our conclusion is that the WMAP 7-year data are consistent with Gaussian primordial fluctuations within ~2{\sigma} CL. We stress however the importance of taking into account the unresolved point sources in the measurement of fnl in future works, especially when using more precise data sets such as the forthcoming Planck data.
  • Stellar radial velocity (RV) measurements have proven to be a very successful method for detecting extrasolar planets. Analysing RV data to determine the parameters of the extrasolar planets is a significant statistical challenge owing to the presence of multiple planets and various degeneracies between orbital parameters. Determining the number of planets favoured by the observed data is an even more difficult task. Bayesian model selection provides a mathematically rigorous solution to this problem by calculating marginal posterior probabilities of models with different number of planets, but the use of this method in extrasolar planetary searches has been hampered by the computational cost of the evaluating Bayesian evidence. Nonetheless, Bayesian model selection has the potential to improve the interpretation of existing observational data and possibly detect yet undiscovered planets. We present a new and efficient Bayesian method for determining the number of extrasolar planets, as well as for inferring their orbital parameters, without having to calculate directly the Bayesian evidence for models containing a large number of planets. Instead, we work iteratively and at each iteration obtain a conservative lower limit on the odds ratio for the inclusion of an additional planet into the model. We apply this method to simulated data-sets containing one and two planets and successfully recover the correct number of planets and reliable constraints on the orbital parameters. We also apply our method to RV measurements of HD 37124, 47 Ursae Majoris and HD 10180. For HD 37124, we confirm that the current data strongly favour a three-planet system. We find strong evidence for the presence of a fourth planet in 47 Ursae Majoris, but its orbital period is suspiciously close to one year, casting doubt on its validity. For HD 10180 we find strong evidence for a six-planet system.
  • The Very Small Array (VSA) has been used to survey the l = 27 to 46 deg, |b|<4 deg region of the Galactic plane at a resolution of 13 arcmin. The survey consists of 44 pointings of the VSA, each with a r.m.s. sensitivity of ~90 mJy/beam. These data are combined in a mosaic to produce a map of the area. The majority of the sources within the map are HII regions. We investigated anomalous radio emission from the warm dust in 9 HII regions of the survey by making spectra extending from GHz frequencies to the FIR IRAS frequencies. Acillary radio data at 1.4, 2.7, 4.85, 8.35, 10.55, 14.35 and 94 GHz in addition to the 100, 60, 25 and 12 micron IRAS bands were used to construct the spectra. From each spectrum the free-free, thermal dust and anomalous dust emission were determined for each HII region. The mean ratio of 33 GHz anomalous flux density to FIR 100 micron flux density for the 9 selected HII regions was 1.10 +/-0.21x10^(-4). When combined with 6 HII regions previously observed with the VSA and the CBI, the anomalous emission from warm dust in HII regions is detected with a 33 GHz emissivity of 4.65 +/- 0.4 micro K/ (MJy/sr) at 11.5{\sigma}. The anomalous radio emission in HII regions is on average 41+/-10 per cent of the radio continuum at 33 GHz.
  • We investigate the dynamics of a cosmological dark matter fluid in the Schr\"odinger formulation, seeking to evaluate the approach as a potential tool for theorists. We find simple wave-mechanical solutions of the equations for the cosmological homogeneous background evolution of the dark matter field, and use them to obtain a piecewise analytic solution for the evolution of a compensated spherical overdensity. We analyse this solution from a `quantum mechanical' viewpoint, and establish the correct boundary conditions satisfied by the wavefunction. Using techniques from multi-particle quantum mechanics, we establish the equations governing the evolution of multiple fluids and then solve them numerically in such a system. Our results establish the viability of the Schr\"odinger formulation as a genuine alternative to standard methods in certain contexts, and a novel way to model multiple fluids.
  • We present observations of the Lynds' dark nebula LDN 1111 made at microwave frequencies between 14.6 and 17.2 GHz with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI). We find emission in this frequency band in excess of a thermal free--free spectrum extrapolated from data at 1.4 GHz with matched uv-coverage. This excess is > 15 sigma above the predicted emission. We fit the measured spectrum using the spinning dust model of Drain & Lazarian (1998a) and find the best fitting model parameters agree well with those derived from Scuba data for this object by Visser et al. (2001).
  • A dynamical analysis of an effective homogeneous and irrotational Weyssenhoff fluid in general relativity is performed using the 1+3 covariant approach that enables the dynamics of the fluid to be determined without assuming any particular form for the space-time metric. The spin contributions to the field equations produce a bounce that averts an initial singularity, provided that the spin density exceeds the rate of shear. At later times, when the spin contribution can be neglected, a Weyssenhoff fluid reduces to a standard cosmological fluid in general relativity. Numerical solutions for the time evolution of the generalised scale factor in spatially-curved models are presented, some of which exhibit eternal oscillatory behaviour without any singularities. In spatially-flat models, analytical solutions for particular values of the equation-of-state parameter are derived. Although the scale factor of a Weyssenhoff fluid generically has a positive temporal curvature near a bounce, it requires unreasonable fine tuning of the equation-of-state parameter to produce a sufficiently extended period of inflation to fit the current observational data.
  • We present a Bayesian approach to modelling galaxy clusters using multi-frequency pointed observations from telescopes that exploit the Sunyaev--Zel'dovich effect. We use the recently developed MultiNest technique (Feroz, Hobson & Bridges, 2008) to explore the high-dimensional parameter spaces and also to calculate the Bayesian evidence. This permits robust parameter estimation as well as model comparison. Tests on simulated Arcminute Microkelvin Imager observations of a cluster, in the presence of primary CMB signal, radio point sources (detected as well as an unresolved background) and receiver noise, show that our algorithm is able to analyse jointly the data from six frequency channels, sample the posterior space of the model and calculate the Bayesian evidence very efficiently on a single processor. We also illustrate the robustness of our detection process by applying it to a field with radio sources and primordial CMB but no cluster, and show that indeed no cluster is identified. The extension of our methodology to the detection and modelling of multiple clusters in multi-frequency SZ survey data will be described in a future work.
  • We study the properties of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (mSUGRA) by performing fits to updated indirect data, including the relic density of dark matter inferred from WMAP5. In order to find the extent to which mu < 0 is disfavoured compared to mu > 0, we compare the Bayesian evidence values for these models, which we obtain straightforwardly and with good precision from the recently developed multi-modal nested sampling ('MultiNest') technique. We find weak to moderate evidence for the mu > 0 branch of mSUGRA over mu < 0 and estimate the ratio of probabilities to be P(mu > 0)/P(mu < 0) = 6-61 depending on the prior measure and range used. There is thus positive (but not overwhelming) evidence that mu > 0 in mSUGRA. The MultiNest technique also delivers probability distributions of parameters and other relevant quantities such as superpartner masses. We explore the dependence of our results on the choice of the prior measure used. We also use the Bayesian evidence to quantify the consistency between the mSUGRA parameter inferences coming from the constraints that have the largest effects: (g-2)_mu, BR(b -> s gamma) and cold dark matter (DM) relic density Omega_{DM}h^2.
  • We derive optimal filters on the sphere in the context of detecting compact objects embedded in a stochastic background process. The matched filter and the scale adaptive filter are derived on the sphere in the most general setting, allowing for directional template profiles and filters. The performance and relative merits of the two optimal filters are discussed. The application of optimal filter theory on the sphere to the detection of compact objects is demonstrated on simulated mock data. A naive detection strategy is adopted, with an initial aim of illustrating the application of the new optimal filters derived on the sphere. Nevertheless, this simple object detection strategy is demonstrated to perform well, even a low signal-to-noise ratio. Code written to compute optimal filters on the sphere (S2FIL), to perform fast directional filtering on the sphere (FastCSWT) and to construct the simulated mock data (COMB) are all made publicly available from http://www.mrao.cam.ac.uk/~jdm57/
  • The Arcminute Microkelvin Imager is a pair of interferometer arrays operating with six frequency channels spanning 13.9-18.2 GHz, with very high sensitivity to angular scales 30''-10'. The telescope is aimed principally at Sunyaev-Zel'dovich imaging of clusters of galaxies. We discuss the design of the telescope and describe and explain its electronic and mechanical systems.
  • We present a method for fast optimal estimation of the temperature angular power spectrum from observations of the cosmic microwave background. We employ a Hamiltonian Monte Carlo (HMC) sampler to obtain samples from the posterior probability distribution of all the power spectrum coefficients given a set of observations. We compare the properties of the HMC and the related Gibbs sampling approach on low-resolution simulations and find that the HMC method performs favourably even in the regime of relatively low signal-to-noise. We also demonstrate the method on high-resolution data by applying it to simulated WMAP data. Analysis of a WMAP-sized data set is possible in a around eighty hours on a high-end desktop computer. HMC imposes few conditions on the distribution to be sampled and provides us with an extremely flexible approach upon which to build.