• We report the discovery of radio emission from the accreting X-ray pulsar and symbiotic X-ray binary GX 1+4 with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. This is the first radio detection of such a system, wherein a strongly magnetized neutron star accretes from the stellar wind of an M-type giant companion. We measure a $9$ GHz radio flux density of $105.3 \pm 7.3$ $\mu$Jy, but cannot place meaningful constraints on the spectral index due to a limited frequency range. We consider several emission mechanisms that could be responsible for the observed radio source. We conclude that the observed properties are consistent with shocks in the interaction of the accretion flow with the magnetosphere, a synchrotron-emitting jet, or a propeller-driven outflow. The stellar wind from the companion is unlikely to be the origin of the radio emission. If the detected radio emission originates from a jet, it would show that that strong magnetic fields ($\geq 10^{12}$ G) do not necessarily suppress jet formation.
  • We present simultaneous radio through sub-mm observations of the black hole X-ray binary (BHXB) V404 Cygni during the most active phase of its June 2015 outburst. Our $4$ hour long set of overlapping observations with the Very Large Array, the Sub-millimeter Array, and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (SCUBA-2), covers 8 different frequency bands (including the first detection of a BHXB jet at $666 \,{\rm GHz}/450\mu m$), providing an unprecedented multi-frequency view of the extraordinary flaring activity seen during this period of the outburst. In particular, we detect multiple rapidly evolving flares, which reach Jy-level fluxes across all of our frequency bands. With this rich data set we performed detailed MCMC modeling of the repeated flaring events. Our custom model adapts the van der Laan synchrotron bubble model to include twin bi-polar ejections, propagating away from the black hole at bulk relativistic velocities, along a jet axis that is inclined to the line of sight. The emission predicted by our model accounts for projection effects, relativistic beaming, and the geometric time delay between the approaching and receding ejecta in each ejection event. We find that a total of 8 bi-polar, discrete jet ejection events can reproduce the emission that we observe in all of our frequency bands remarkably well. With our best fit model, we provide detailed probes of jet speed, structure, energetics, and geometry. Our analysis demonstrates the paramount importance of the mm/sub-mm bands, which offer a unique, more detailed view of the jet than can be provided by radio frequencies alone.
  • Black hole X-ray binaries undergo occasional outbursts caused by changing inner accretion flows. Here we report high-angular resolution radio observations of the 2013 outburst of the black hole candidate X-ray binary system J1908+094, using data from the VLBA and EVN. We show that following a hard-to-soft state transition, we detect moving jet knots that appear asymmetric in morphology and brightness, and expand to become laterally resolved as they move away from the core, along an axis aligned approximately $-11$\degree\ east of north. We initially see only the southern component, whose evolution gives rise to a 15-mJy radio flare and generates the observed radio polarization. This fades and becomes resolved out after 4 days, after which a second component appears to the north, moving in the opposite direction. From the timing of the appearance of the knots relative to the X-ray state transition, a 90\degree\ swing of the inferred magnetic field orientation, the asymmetric appearance of the knots, their complex and evolving morphology, and their low speeds, we interpret the knots as working surfaces where the jets impact the surrounding medium. This would imply a substantially denser environment surrounding XTE J1908+094 than has been inferred to exist around the microquasar sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40.
  • We present the results of our intensive radio observing campaign of the dwarf nova SS Cyg during its 2010 April outburst. We argue that the observed radio emission was produced by synchrotron emission from a transient radio jet. Comparing the radio light curves from previous and subsequent outbursts of this system (including high-resolution observations from outbursts in 2011 and 2012) shows that the typical long and short outbursts of this system exhibit reproducible radio outbursts that do not vary significantly between outbursts, which is consistent with the similarity of the observed optical, ultraviolet and X-ray light curves. Contemporaneous optical and X-ray observations show that the radio emission appears to have been triggered at the same time as the initial X-ray flare, which occurs as disk material first reaches the boundary layer. This raises the possibility that the boundary region may be involved in jet production in accreting white dwarf systems. Our high spatial resolution monitoring shows that the compact jet remained active throughout the outburst with no radio quenching.
  • We empirically evaluate the scheme proposed by Lieu & Duan (2013) in which the light curve of a time-steady radio source is predicted to exhibit increased variability on a characteristic timescale set by the sightline's electron column density. Application to extragalactic sources is of significant appeal as it would enable a unique and reliable probe of cosmic baryons. We examine temporal power spectra for 3C 84 observed at 1.7 GHz with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. These data constrain the ratio between standard deviation and mean intensity for 3C 84 to less than 0.05% at temporal frequencies ranging between 0.1-200 Hz. This limit is 3 orders of magnitude below the variability predicted by Lieu & Duan (2013) and is in accord with theoretical arguments presented by Hirata & McQuinn (2014) rebutting electron density dependence. We identify other spectral features in the data consistent with the slow solar wind, a coronal mass ejection, and the ionosphere.
  • We report on third epoch VLBI observations of the radio-bright supernova SN 2011dh located in the nearby (7.8 Mpc) galaxy M51. The observations took place at $t=453$ d after the explosion and at a frequency of 8.4 GHz. We obtained a fairly well resolved image of the shell of SN 2011dh, making it one of only six recent supernovae for which resolved images of the ejecta are available. SN 2011dh has a relatively clear shell morphology, being almost circular in outline, although there may be some asymmetry in brightness around the ridge. By fitting a spherical shell model directly to the visibility measurements we determine the angular radius of SN 2011dh's radio emission to be $636 \pm 29$ $\mu$as. At a distance of 7.8 Mpc, this angular radius corresponds to a linear radius of $(7.4 \pm 0.3) \times 10^{16}$ cm and an average expansion velocity since the explosion of $19000^{+2800}_{-2400}$ kms$^{-1}$. We combine our VLBI measurements of SN 2011dh's radius with values determined from the radio spectral energy distribution under the assumption of a synchrotron-self-absorbed spectrum, and find all the radii are consistent with a power-law evolution, with $R \sim t^{0.97\pm0.01}$, implying almost free expansion over the period $t=4$ d to 453 d.
  • Aurorae are detected from all the magnetized planets in our Solar System, including Earth. They are powered by magnetospheric current systems that lead to the precipitation of energetic electrons into the high-latitude regions of the upper atmosphere. In the case of the gas-giant planets, these aurorae include highly polarized radio emission at kilohertz and megahertz frequencies produced by the precipitating electrons, as well as continuum and line emission in the infrared, optical, ultraviolet and X-ray parts of the spectrum, associated with the collisional excitation and heating of the hydrogen-dominated atmosphere. Here we report simultaneous radio and optical spectroscopic observations of an object at the end of the stellar main sequence, located right at the boundary between stars and brown dwarfs, from which we have detected radio and optical auroral emissions both powered by magnetospheric currents. Whereas the magnetic activity of stars like our Sun is powered by processes that occur in their lower atmospheres, these aurorae are powered by processes originating much further out in the magnetosphere of the dwarf star that couple energy into the lower atmosphere. The dissipated power is at least four orders of magnitude larger than what is produced in the Jovian magnetosphere, revealing aurorae to be a potentially ubiquitous signature of large-scale magnetospheres that can scale to luminosities far greater than those observed in our Solar System. These magnetospheric current systems may also play a part in powering some of the weather phenomena reported on brown dwarfs.
  • The universal link between the processes of accretion and ejection leads to the formation of jets and outflows around accreting compact objects. Incoherent synchrotron emission from these outflows can be observed from a wide range of accreting binaries, including black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs. Monitoring the evolution of the radio emission during their sporadic outbursts provides important insights into the launching of jets, and, when coupled with the behaviour of the source at shorter wavelengths, probes the underlying connection with the accretion process. Radio observations can also probe the impact of jets/outflows (including other explosive events such as magnetar giant flares) on the ambient medium, quantifying their kinetic feedback. The high sensitivity of the SKA will open up new parameter space, enabling the monitoring of accreting stellar-mass compact objects from their bright, Eddington-limited outburst states down to the lowest-luminosity quiescent levels, whose intrinsic faintness has to date precluded detailed studies. A census of quiescently accreting black holes will also constrain binary evolution processes. By enabling us to extend our existing investigations of black hole jets to the fainter jets from neutron star and white dwarf systems, the SKA will permit comparative studies to determine the role of the compact object in jet formation. The high sensitivity, wide field of view and multi-beaming capability of the SKA will enable the detection and monitoring of all bright flaring transients in the observable local Universe, including the ULXs, ... [Abridged] This chapter reviews the science goals outlined above, demonstrating the progress that will be made by the SKA. We also discuss the potential of the astrometric and imaging observations that would be possible should a significant VLBI component be included in the SKA.
  • We report striking changes in the broadband spectrum of the compact jet of the black hole transient MAXI J1836-194 over state transitions during its discovery outburst in 2011. A fading of the optical-infrared (IR) flux occurred as the source entered the hard-intermediate state, followed by a brightening as it returned to the hard state. The optical-IR spectrum was consistent with a power law from optically thin synchrotron emission, except when the X-ray spectrum was softest. By fitting the radio to optical spectra with a broken power law, we constrain the frequency and flux of the optically thick/thin break in the jet synchrotron spectrum. The break gradually shifted to higher frequencies as the source hardened at X-ray energies, from ~ 10^11 to ~ 4 x 10^13 Hz. The radiative jet luminosity integrated over the spectrum appeared to be greatest when the source entered the hard state during the outburst decay (although this is dependent on the high energy cooling break, which is not seen directly), even though the radio flux was fading at the time. The physical process responsible for suppressing and reactivating the jet (neither of which are instantaneous but occur on timescales of weeks) is uncertain, but could arise from the varying inner accretion disk radius regulating the fraction of accreting matter that is channeled into the jet. This provides an unprecedented insight into the connection between inflow and outflow, and has implications for the conditions required for jets to be produced, and hence their launching process.
  • We report on phase-referenced VLBI radio observations of the Type IIb supernova 2011dh, at times t = 83 days and 179 days after the explosion and at frequencies, respectively, of 22.2 and 8.4 GHz. We detected SN 2011dh at both epochs. At the first epoch only an upper limit on SN 2011dh's angular size was obtained, but at the second epoch, we determine the angular radius SN 2011dh's radio emission to be 0.25 +- 0.08 mas by fitting a spherical shell model directly to the visibility measurements. At a distance of 8.4 Mpc this angular radius corresponds to a time-averaged (since t=0) expansion velocity of the forward shock of 21000 +- 7000 km/s. Our measured values of the radius of the emission region are in excellent agreement with those derived from fitting synchrotron self-absorbed models to the radio spectral energy distribution, providing strong confirmation for the latter method of estimating the radius. We find that SN 2011dh's radius evolves in a power-law fashion, with R proportional to t^(0.92 +- 0.10).
  • We report on a pilot imaging line survey (36.0 - 37.0 GHz, with ~1 km/s spectral channels) with the Expanded Very Large Array for two asymptotic giant branch stars, RW LMi (= CIT6, which has a carbon-rich circumstellar envelope) and IK Tau (= NML Tau, with an oxygen-rich circumstellar envelope). Radio continuum emission consistent with photospheric emission was detected from both stars. From RW LMi we imaged the HC3N (J = 4 -> 3) emission. The images show several partial rings of emission; these multiple shells trace the evolution of the CSE from 400 to 1200 years. SiS (J = 2 -> 1) emission was detected from both RW LMi and IK Tau. For both stars the SiS emission is centrally condensed with the peak line emission coincident with the stellar radio continuum emission. In addition, we have detected weak HC7N (J = 32 -> 31) emission from RW LMi.
  • Active galactic nuclei (AGN), powered by long-term accretion onto central supermassive black holes, produce relativistic jets with lifetimes of greater than one million yr that preclude observations at birth. Transient accretion onto a supermassive black hole, for example through the tidal disruption of a stray star, may therefore offer a unique opportunity to observe and study the birth of a relativistic jet. On 2011 March 25, the Swift {\gamma}-ray satellite discovered an unusual transient source (Swift J164449.3+573451) potentially representing such an event. Here we present the discovery of a luminous radio transient associated with Swift J164449.3+573451, and an extensive set of observations spanning centimeter to millimeter wavelengths and covering the first month of evolution. These observations lead to a positional coincidence with the nucleus of an inactive galaxy, and provide direct evidence for a newly-formed relativistic outflow, launched by transient accretion onto a million solar mass black hole. While a relativistic outflow was not predicted in this scenario, we show that the tidal disruption of a star naturally explains the high-energy properties, radio luminosity, and the inferred rate of such events. The weaker beaming in the radio compared to {\gamma}-rays/X-rays, suggests that radio searches may uncover similar events out to redshifts of z ~ 6.
  • The radio continuum emission from the Galaxy has a rich mix of thermal and non-thermal emission. This very richness makes their interpretation challenging since the low radio opacity means that a radio image represents the sum of all emission regions along the line-of-sight. These challenges make the existing narrow-band radio surveys of the Galactic plane difficult to interpret: e.g. a small region of emission might be a supernova remnant (SNR) or an HII region, or a complex combination of both. Instantaneous wide bandwidth radio observations in combination with the capability for high resolution spectral index mapping, can be directly used to disentangle these effects. Here we demonstrate simultaneous continuum and spectral index imaging capability at the full continuum sensitivity and resolution using newly developed wide-band wide-field imaging algorithms. Observations were done in the L- and C-Band with a total bandwidth of 1 and 2 GHz respectively. We present preliminary results in the form of a full-field continuum image covering the wide-band sensitivity pattern of the EVLA centered on a large but poorly studied SNR (G55.7+3.4) and relatively narrower field continuum and spectral index maps of three fields containing SNR and diffused thermal emission. We demonstrate that spatially resolved spectral index maps differentiates regions with emission of different physical origin (spectral index variation across composite SNRs and separation of thermal and non-thermal emission), superimposed along the line of sight. The wide-field image centered on the SNR G55.7+3.4 also demonstrates the excellent wide-field wide-band imaging capability of the EVLA.
  • We present the most recent VLBI images of SN 1993J, taken at 1.7 GHz on 2010 March 5-6, along with a discussion of its evolution with time. The new image is the latest in a sequence covering almost the entire lifetime of the supernova. For these latest observations we used an "in beam calibrator" technique, and obtained a background rms brightness of 3.7 micro-Jy/beam. The supernova shell remains quite circular in outline. Modulations in brightness are seen around the rim which evolve relatively slowly, having remained generally similar over the last several years of observation. We determine the outer radius of the supernova using visibility-plane model-fitting. The supernova has slowed down to around 30% of its original expansion velocity, and continues to expand with radius approximately proportional to t^0.8, however, deviations from a strict power-law evolution are seen. We do not find any clear-cut evidence for systematically frequency-dependent evolution, suggesting that the radii as determined from visibility-plane model-fitting continue to provide reasonable estimates of the physical outer shock-front radius.
  • The 2009 November outburst of the neutron star X-ray binary Aquila X-1 was observed with unprecedented radio coverage and simultaneous pointed X-ray observations, tracing the radio emission around the full X-ray hysteresis loop of the outburst for the first time. We use these data to discuss the disc-jet coupling, finding the radio emission to be consistent with being triggered at state transitions, both from the hard to the soft spectral state and vice versa. Our data appear to confirm previous suggestions of radio quenching in the soft state above a threshold X-ray luminosity of about 10% of the Eddington luminosity. We also present the first detections of Aql X-1 with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), showing that any extended emission is relatively diffuse, and consistent with steady jets rather than arising from discrete, compact knots. In all cases where multi-frequency data were available, the source radio spectrum is consistent with being flat or slightly inverted, suggesting that the internal shock mechanism that is believed to produce optically thin transient radio ejecta in black hole X-ray binaries is not active in Aql X-1.
  • We present new VLBI images of supernova 1986J, taken at 5, 8.4 and 22 GHz between t=22 to 25 yr after the explosion. The shell expands as t^(0.69+-0.03). We estimate the progenitor's mass-loss rate at (4 ~ 10) * 10^-5 Msol/yr (for v_w = 10 km/s). Two bright spots are seen in the images. The first, in the northeast, is now fading. The second, very near the center of the projected shell and unique to SN1986J, is still brightening relative to the shell, and now dominates the VLBI images. It is marginally resolved at 22 GHz (diameter ~0.3 mas; ~5 * 10^16 cm at 10 Mpc). The integrated VLA spectrum of SN1986J shows an inversion point and a high-frequency turnover, both progressing downward in frequency and due to the central bright spot. The optically-thin spectral index of the central bright spot is indistinguishable from that of the shell. The small proper motion of 1500+-1500 km/s of the central bright spot is consistent with our previous interpretation of it as being associated with the expected black-hole or neutron-star remnant. Now, an alternate scenario seems also plausible, where the central bright spot, like the northeast one, results when the shock front impacts on a condensation within the circumstellar medium (CSM). The condensation would have to be so dense as to be opaque at cm wavelengths (~1000x denser than the average corresponding CSM) and fortuitously close to the center of the projected shell. We include a movie of the evolution of SN1986J at 5 GHz from t=0 to 25 yr.
  • Using new and archival radio data, we have measured the proper motion of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg to be 9.2+/-0.3 mas/yr. Combined with the systemic radial velocity from the literature, we derive the full three-dimensional heliocentric space velocity of the system, which we use to calculate a peculiar velocity in the range 47-102 km/s, with a best fitting value of 64 km/s. We consider possible explanations for the observed peculiar velocity, and find that the black hole cannot have formed via direct collapse. A natal supernova is required, in which either significant mass (approximately 11 solar masses) was lost, giving rise to a symmetric Blaauw kick of up to 65 km/s, or, more probably, asymmetries in the supernova led to an additional kick out of the orbital plane of the binary system. In the case of a purely symmetric kick, the black hole must have been formed with a mass of approximately 9 solar masses, since when it has accreted 0.5-1.5 solar masses from its companion.
  • We present excellent resolution and high sensitivity Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the 21cm HI line emission from the face-on galaxy NGC 1058, providing the first reliable study of the HI profile shapes throughout the entire disk of an external galaxy. Our observations show an intriguing picture of the interstellar medium; throughout this galaxy velocity-- dispersions range between 4 to 15 km/sec but are not correlated with star formation, stars or the gaseous spiral arms. The velocity dispersions decrease with radius, but this global trend has a large scatter as there are several isolated, resolved regions of high dispersion. The decline of star light with radius is much steeper than that of the velocity dispersions or that of the energy in the gas motions.
  • We report on VLBI observations of M81*, the northwest-southeast oriented nuclear core-jet source of the spiral galaxy M81, at five different frequencies between 1.7 and 14.8 GHz. By phase referencing to supernova 1993J we can accurately locate the emission region of M81* in the galaxy's reference frame. Although the emission region's size decreases with increasing frequency while the brightness peak moves to the southwest, the emission region seems sharply bounded to the southwest at all frequencies. We argue that the core must be located between the brightness peak at our highest frequency (14.8 GHz) and the sharp bound to the southwest. This narrowly constrains the location of the core, or the purported black hole in the center of the galaxy, to be within a region of +/-0.2 mas or +/-800 AU (at a distance of ~4 Mpc). This range includes the core position that we determined earlier by finding the most stationary point in the brightness distribution of M81* at only a single frequency. This independent constraint therefore strongly confirms our earlier core position. Our observations also confirm that M81* is a core-jet source, with a one-sided jet that extends to the northeast from the core, on average curved somewhat to the east, with a radio spectrum that is flat or inverted near the core and steep at the distant end. The brightness peak is unambiguously identified with the variable jet rather than the core, which indicates limitations in determining the proper motion of nearby galaxies and in refining the extragalactic reference frame.
  • We present two sequences of VLBI images of SN1993J in M81, with 24 images at 8.4 GHz and 19 images at 5.0 GHz, These sequences, from 50 d to ~9 yr after shock breakout, show the evolution of the expanding radio shell of an exploded star in detail. The images are all phase-referenced to the stable reference point of the core of M81, allowing us to display them relative to the supernova explosion center. At 50 d, SN1993J is almost unresolved with a radius of 520 AU. The shell structure becomes discernible at 175 d. The brightness of the ridge of the projected shell is not uniform, but rather varies by a factor of two, having a distinct maximum to the south-east and a minimum to the west. Over the next ~350 d, this pattern appears to rotate counter-clockwise. After two years, the structure becomes more complex with hot spots developing in the east, south, and west. The pattern of modulation continues to change, and after five years the three hot spots have shifted somewhat. After nine years, the radio shell has expanded to a radius of 19,000 AU. The brightness in the center of the images is lower than expected for an optically thin, spherical shell. Absorption in the center is favored over a thinner shell in the back and/or front. Allowing for absorption, we find that the thickness of the shell is (25+/-3)% of its outer radius. We find no compact source in the central region and conclude that any pulsar nebula in the center of SN 1993J is either much fainter than the Crab or affected by remaining significant internal radio absorption.
  • Phase-referenced VLBI observations of supernova 1993J at 24 epochs, from 50 days after shock breakout to the present, allowed us to determine the coordinates of the explosion center relative to the quasi-stationary core of the host galaxy M81 with an accuracy of 45 micro-arcsec, and to determine the nominal proper motion of the geometric center of the radio shell with an accuracy of 9micro-arcsec/yr. The uncertainties correspond to 160 AU for the position and 160 km/s for the proper motion at the distance of the source of 3.63 Mpc. After correcting for the expected galactic proper motion of the supernova around the core of M81 using HI rotation curves, we obtain a peculiar proper motion of the radio shell center of only 320 +/- 160 km/s to the south, which limits any possible one-sided expansion of the shell. We also find that the shell is highly circular, the outer contours in fact being circular to within 3%. Combining our proper motion values with the degree of circular symmetry, we find that the expansion of the shockfront from the explosion center is isotropic to within 5.5% in the plane of the sky. This is a more fundamental result on isotropic expansion than can be derived from the circularity of the images alone. The brightness of the radio shell, however, varies along the ridge and systematically changes with time. The degree of isotropy in the expansion of the shockfront contrasts with the asymmetries and polarization found in optical spectral lines. Asymmetric density distributions in the ejecta or more likely in the circumstellar medium, are favored to reconcile the radio and optical results. We see no sign of any disk-like density distribution of the circumstellar material, with the average axis ratio of the radio shell of SN1993J being less than 1.04.
  • The nucleus of M81 was observed at 8.3 GHz with VLBI at 20 epochs over 4.5yrs, with a linear resolution at the source of about 2000 AU or 0.01 pc. Phase-referenced mapping with respect to the geometric center of supernova 1993J enabled us to find, with a standard error of about 600 AU, a stationary point in the source. We identify this point as the location of the core and the putative black hole at the gravitational center of the galaxy. The upper bound on the core's average velocity on the sky is <730 km/s. A short, one-sided jet extends from the core. The orientation of the jet varies smoothly, with timescales of about 1yr and an rms of 6degrees about the mean of 50degrees. Occasionally the jet appears to bend to the east. The length of the jet is only about 1 mas (3,600 AU), and varies with an rms of about 20%. The inferred speeds are below 0.08c. The total flux density of the core-jet varies erratically, changing on occasion by a factor of two over a few weeks, without any significant changes in the source size and orientation. The inferred velocity of the plasma flow is >0.25c. The results are consistent with a model in which plasma condensations with short lifetimes are ejected relativistically from the core on a timescale of less than a few weeks, and then travel along a tube whose pattern and geometry are also variable but only on a timescale of about one year. The central engine of M81 has qualitative similarities to those of powerful the AGN of radio galaxies and quasars, and may also represent in power and size a scaled-up version of the largely hidden nucleus in our own Galaxy.
  • We review the recent multifrequency studies of galactic black hole binaries, aiming at revealing the underlying emission processes and physical properties in these systems. The optical and infrared observations are important for determining their system parameters, such as the companion star type, orbital period and separation, inclination angle and the black hole mass. The radio observations are useful for studying high energy electron acceleration process, jet formation and transport. X-ray observations can be used to probe the inner accretion disk region in order to understand the fundamental physics of the accretion disk in the strongest gravitational field and the properties of the black hole. Future higher sensitivity and better resolution instrumentation will be needed to answer the many fundamental questions that have arisen.