• The attempt to describe the recent accelerated expansion of the universe includes different propositions for dark energy models and modified gravity theories. Establish their features in order to discriminate and even rule out part of these models using observational data is a fundamental issue of cosmology. In the present work we consider a class of extended theories of gravity (ETGs) that are minimally coupled to the ordinary matter fields. In this context, and assuming a homogeneous and isotropic spacetime, we derive the energy conditions for this ETG class, which provide bounds for the ETG modifications. We then put constraints on these bounds using a model-independent approach to reconstruct the deceleration function along with the Joint Light-curve Analysis (JLA) supernova sample, 11 baryon acoustic oscillation and 22 cosmic-chronometer measurements. We also obtain an additional bound imposing the strong energy condition only on the ordinary matter. The main result of this work is a set of bounds that every considered ETG must fulfill given the aforementioned assumptions. We apply these bounds to verify the fulfillment/violation of the energy conditions in the context of general relativity. For instance, the strong energy condition is violated, corresponding to an accelerated expansion, with more than $5.22\sigma$ confidence interval considering the whole reconstruction interval. Finally, we show how these bounds can restrict the dynamics of the ETGs by imposing general assumptions on the ETG effective energy density. In this case, there is a preference for a phantom like behavior depending on how this quantity evolves.
  • Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) enables parameter inference for complex physical systems in cases where the true likelihood function is unknown, unavailable, or computationally too expensive. It relies on the forward simulation of mock data and comparison between observed and synthetic catalogues. Here we present cosmoabc, a Python ABC sampler featuring a Population Monte Carlo (PMC) variation of the original ABC algorithm, which uses an adaptive importance sampling scheme. The code is very flexible and can be easily coupled to an external simulator, while allowing to incorporate arbitrary distance and prior functions. As an example of practical application, we coupled cosmoabc with the numcosmo library and demonstrate how it can be used to estimate posterior probability distributions over cosmological parameters based on measurements of galaxy clusters number counts without computing the likelihood function. cosmoabc is published under the GPLv3 license on PyPI and GitHub and documentation is available at http://goo.gl/SmB8EX
  • We determine the mass scale of Planck galaxy clusters using gravitational lensing mass measurements from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). We have compared the lensing masses to the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) mass proxy for 21 clusters in common, employing a Bayesian analysis to simultaneously fit an idealized CLASH selection function and the distribution between the measured observables and true cluster mass. We used a tiered analysis strategy to explicitly demonstrate the importance of priors on weak lensing mass accuracy. In the case of an assumed constant bias, $b_{SZ}$, between true cluster mass, $M_{500}$, and the Planck mass proxy, $M_{PL}$, our analysis constrains $1- b_{SZ} = 0.73\pm 0.10$ when moderate priors on weak lensing accuracy are used, including a zero-mean Gaussian with standard deviation of 8% to account for possible bias in lensing mass estimations. Our analysis explicitly accounts for possible selection bias effects in this calibration sourced by the CLASH selection function. Our constraint on the cluster mass scale is consistent with recent results from the Weighing the Giants program and the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project. It is also consistent, at 1.34$\sigma$, with the value needed to reconcile the Planck SZ cluster counts with Planck's base $\Lambda$CDM model fit to the primary cosmic microwave background anisotropies.
  • Evidences for late-time acceleration of the Universe are provided by multiple probes, such as Type Ia supernovae, the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale structure (LSS). In this work, we focus on the integrated Sachs--Wolfe (ISW) effect, i.e., secondary CMB fluctuations generated by evolving gravitational potentials due to the transition between, e.g., the matter and dark energy (DE) dominated phases. Therefore, assuming a flat universe, DE properties can be inferred from ISW detections. We present a Bayesian approach to compute the CMB--LSS cross-correlation signal. The method is based on the estimate of the likelihood for measuring a combined set consisting of a CMB temperature and a galaxy contrast maps, provided that we have some information on the statistical properties of the fluctuations affecting these maps. The likelihood is estimated by a sampling algorithm, therefore avoiding the computationally demanding techniques of direct evaluation in either pixel or harmonic space. As local tracers of the matter distribution at large scales, we used the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) galaxy catalog and, for the CMB temperature fluctuations, the ninth-year data release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9). The results show a dominance of cosmic variance over the weak recovered signal, due mainly to the shallowness of the catalog used, with systematics associated with the sampling algorithm playing a secondary role as sources of uncertainty. When combined with other complementary probes, the method presented in this paper is expected to be a useful tool to late-time acceleration studies in cosmology.
  • Distance measurements are currently the most powerful tool to study the expansion history of the universe without specifying its matter content nor any theory of gravitation. Assuming only an isotropic, homogeneous and flat universe, in this work we introduce a model-independent method to reconstruct directly the deceleration function via a piecewise function. Including a penalty factor, we are able to vary continuously the complexity of the deceleration function from a linear case to an arbitrary $(n+1)$-knots spline interpolation. We carry out a Monte Carlo (MC) analysis to determine the best penalty factor, evaluating the bias-variance trade-off, given the uncertainties of the SDSS-II and SNLS supernova combined sample (JLA), compilations of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) and $H(z)$ data. The bias-variance analysis is done for three fiducial models with different features in the deceleration curve. For each fiducial model, we test different reconstructions using, in each case, more than $10^4$ catalogs in a total of about $5\times 10^5$. This investigation proved to be essential in determining the best reconstruction to study these data. We show that, evaluating a single fiducial model, the conclusions about the bias-variance ratio are misleading. We determine the reconstruction method in which the bias represents at most $10\%$ of the total uncertainty. Finally, we apply the Ensemble Sampler Markov Chain Monte Carlo (ESMCMC) method to explore the posterior of the deceleration function up to redshift $1.3$ (using only JLA) and $2.3$ (JLA+BAO+$H(z)$). We obtain that the standard cosmological model agrees within $3\sigma$ level with the reconstructed results in the whole studied redshift intervals. Since our method is calibrated to minimize the bias, the error bars of the reconstructed functions are a good approximation for the total uncertainty.
  • Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys are promising probes of cosmology - in particular for Dark Energy (DE) -, given their ability to find distant clusters and provide estimates for their mass. However, current SZ catalogs contain tens to hundreds of objects and maximum likelihood estimators may present biases for such sample sizes. In this work we use the Monte Carlo approach to determine the presence of bias on cosmological parameter estimators from cluster abundance as a function of the area and depth of the survey, and the number of cosmological parameters fitted. Assuming perfect knowledge of mass and redshift some estimators have non-negligible biases. For example, the bias of $\sigma_8$ corresponds to about $40%$ of its statistical error bar when fitted together with $\Omega_c$ and $w_0$. Including a SZ mass-observable relation decreases the relevance of the bias, for the typical sizes of current surveys. The biases become negligible when combining the SZ data with other cosmological probes. However, we show that the biases from SZ estimators do not go away with increasing sample sizes and they may become the dominant source of error for an all sky survey at the South Pole Telescope (SPT) sensitivity. The results of this work validate the use of the current maximum likelihood methods for present SZ surveys, but highlight the need for further studies for upcoming experiments. [abridged]