• F. Acero, J.-T. Acquaviva, R. Adam, N. Aghanim, M. Allen, M. Alves, R. Ammanouil, R. Ansari, A. Araudo, E. Armengaud, B. Ascaso, E. Athanassoula, D. Aubert, S. Babak, A. Bacmann, A. Banday, K. Barriere, F. Bellossi, J.-P. Bernard, M. G. Bernardini, M. Béthermin, E. Blanc, L. Blanchet, J. Bobin, S. Boissier, C. Boisson, A. Boselli, A. Bosma, S. Bosse, S. Bottinelli, F. Boulanger, R. Boyer, A. Bracco, C. Briand, M. Bucher, V. Buat, L. Cambresy, M. Caillat, J.-M. Casandjian, E. Caux, S. Célestin, M. Cerruti, P. Charlot, E. Chassande-Mottin, S. Chaty, N. Christensen, L. Ciesla, N. Clerc, J. Cohen-Tanugi, I. Cognard, F. Combes, B. Comis, S. Corbel, B. Cordier, M. Coriat, R. Courtin, H. Courtois, B. Da Silva, E. Daddi, R. Dallier, E. Dartois, K. Demyk, J.-M. Denis, L. Denis, A. Djannati-Ataï, J.-F. Donati, M. Douspis, W. van Driel, M. N. El Korso, E. Falgarone, A. Fantina, T. Farges, A. Ferrari, C. Ferrari, K. Ferrière, R. Flamary, N. Gac, S. Gauffre, F. Genova, J. Girard, I. Grenier, J.-M. Griessmeier, P. Guillard, L. Guillemot, F. Gulminelli, A. Gusdorf, E. Habart, F. Hammer, P. Hennebelle, F. Herpin, O. Hervet, A. Hughes, O. Ilbert, M. Janvier, E. Josselin, A. Julier, C. Lachaud, G. Lagache, R. Lallement, S. Lambert, L. Lamy, M. Langer, P. Larzabal, G. Lavaux, T. Le Bertre, O. Le Fèvre, A. Le Tiec, B. Lefloch, M. Lehnert, M. Lemoine-Goumard, F. Levrier, M. Limousin, D. Lis, A. López-Sepulcre, J. Macias-Perez, C. Magneville, A. Marcowith, J. Margueron, G. Marquette, D. Marshall, L. Martin, D. Mary, S. Masson, S. Maurogordato, C. Mazauric, Y. Mellier, M.-A. Miville-Deschênes, L. Montier, F. Mottez, D. Mourard, N. Nesvadba, J.-F. Nezan, P. Noterdaeme, J. Novak, P. Ocvirk, M. Oertel, X. Olive, V. Ollier, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, M. Pandey-Pommier, Y. Pennec, M. Pérault, C. Peroux, P. Petit, J. Pétri, A. Petiteau, J. Pety, G. W. Pratt, M. Puech, B. Quertier, E. Raffin, S. Rakotozafy Harison, S. Rawson, M. Renaud, B. Revenu, C. Richard, J. Richard, F. Rincon, I. Ristorcelli, J. Rodriguez, M. Schultheis, C. Schimd, B. Semelin, H. Sol, J.-L. Starck, M. Tagger, C. Tasse, G. Theureau, S. Torchinsky, C. Vastel, S. D. Vergani, L. Verstraete, X. Vigouroux, N. Vilmer, J.-P. Vilotte, N. Webb, N. Ysard, P. Zarka
    March 28, 2018 astro-ph.IM
    The "Square Kilometre Array" (SKA) is a large international radio telescope project characterised, as suggested by its name, by a total collecting area of approximately one square kilometre, and consisting of several interferometric arrays to observe at metric and centimetric wavelengths. The deployment of the SKA will take place in two sites, in South Africa and Australia, and in two successive phases. From its Phase 1, the SKA will be one of the most formidable scientific machines ever deployed by mankind, and by far the most impressive in terms of data throughput and required computing power. With the participation of almost 200 authors from forty research institutes and six private companies, the publication of this French SKA white paper illustrates the strong involvement in the SKA project of the French astronomical community and of a rapidly growing number of major scientific and technological players in the fields of Big Data, high performance computing, energy production and storage, as well as system integration.
  • Recent observations of our neighbouring galaxy M31 have revealed that its disk was shaped by widespread events. The evidence for this includes the high dispersion ($V/\sigma$ $\le$ 3) of stars older than 2 Gyr, and a global star formation episode, 2-4 Gyr ago. Using the modern hydrodynamical code, GIZMO, we have performed 300 high-resolution simulations to explore the extent to which these observed properties can be explained by a single merger. We find that the observed M31 disk resembles models having experienced a 4:1 merger, in which the nuclei coalesced 1.8-3 Gyr ago, and where the first passage took place 7 to 10 Gyr ago at a large pericentre distance (32 kpc). We also show that within a family of orbital parameters, the Giant Stream (GS) can be formed with various merger mass-ratios, from 2:1 to 300:1. A recent major merger may be the only way to create the very unusual age-dispersion relation in the disk. It reproduces and explains the long-lived 10 kpc ring, the widespread and recent star formation event, the absence of a remnant of the GS progenitor, the apparent complexity of the 3D spatial distribution of the GS, the NE and G Clumps and their formation process, and the observed slope of the halo profile. These modelling successes lead us to propose that the bulk of the substructure in the M31 halo, as well as the complexity of the inner galaxy, may be attributable to a single major interaction with a galaxy that has now fully coalesced with Andromeda.
  • The low distance, $z=0.0591$, of GRB 100316D and its association with SN 2010bh represent two important motivations for studying this host galaxy and the GRB's immediate environment with the Integral-Field Spectrographs like VLT/MUSE. Its large field-of-view allows us to create 2D maps of gas metallicity, ionization level, and the star-formation rate distribution maps, as well as to investigate the presence of possible host companions. The host is a late-type dwarf irregular galaxy with multiple star-forming regions and an extended central region with signatures of on-going shock interactions. The GRB site is characterized by the lowest metallicity, the highest star-formation rate and the youngest ($\sim$ 20-30 Myr) stellar population in the galaxy, which suggest a GRB progenitor stellar population with masses up to 20 -- 40 $M_{\odot}$. We note that the GRB site has an offset of $\sim$660pc from the most luminous SF region in the host. The observed SF activity in this galaxy may have been triggered by a relatively recent gravitational encounter between the host and a small undetected ($L_{H\alpha} \leq 10^{36}$ erg/s) companion.
  • We investigate the existence of a metallicity threshold for the production of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). We used the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 sample of LGRBs. We considered the stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and metallicity determined from the host galaxy photometry and spectroscopy up to z = 2 and used them to compare the distribution of host galaxies to that of field galaxies in the mass-metallicity and fundamental metallicity relation plane. We find that although LGRBs also form in galaxies with relatively large stellar masses, the large majority of host galaxies have metallicities below log(O=H)~8.6. The extension to z = 2 results in a good sampling of stellar masses also above Log(Mstar/Msun)~9.5 and provides evidence that LGRB host galaxies do not follow the fundamental metallicity relation. As shown by the comparison with dedicated numerical simulations of LGRB host galaxy population, these results are naturally explained by the existence of a mild (~0.7 Zsun) threshold for the LGRB formation. The present statistics does not allow us to discriminate between different shapes of the metallicity cutoff, but the relatively high metallicity threshold found in this work is somewhat in disagreement to most of the standard single-star models for LGRB progenitors.
  • We have studied a representative sample of intermediate-mass galaxies at z~1, observed by the kinematic survey KMOS3D. We have re-estimated the kinematical parameters from the published kinematic maps and analysed photometric data from HST to measure optical disk inclinations and PAs. We find that only half of the z~1 galaxies show kinematic properties consistent with rotating disks, using the same classification scheme than that adopted by the KMOS3D team. Because merger orbital motions can also brought rotation, we have also analysed galaxy morphologies from the available HST imagery. Combining these results to those from kinematics, it leads to a full morpho-kinematic classification. To test the robustness of the latter for disentangling isolated disks from mergers, we confronted the results with an analysis of pairs from the open-grism redshift survey 3D-HST. All galaxies found in pairs are affected by either kinematic and/or morphological perturbations. Conversely, all galaxies classified as virialized spirals are found to be isolated. A significant fraction (one fourth) of rotating disks classified from kinematics by the KMOS3D team are found in pairs, which further supports the need for a morpho-kinematic classification. It results that only one third of z~1 galaxies are isolated and virialized spirals, while 58% of them are likely involved in a merger sequence, from first approach to disk rebuilding. The later fraction is in good agreement with the results of semi-empirical {\Lambda}CDM models, supporting a merger-dominated hierarchical scenario as being the main driver of galaxy formation at least during the last 8 billion years.
  • There are 8000 galaxies, including 1600 at z larger than 1.6, which could be simultaneously observed in an E-ELT field of view of 40 sq. arcmin. A considerable fraction of astrophysical discoveries require large statistical samples, which can only be obtained with multi-object spectrographs (MOS). MOSAIC will provide a vast discovery space, enabled by a multiplex of 200 and spectral resolving powers of R=5000 and 20000. MOSAIC will also offer the unique capability of more than 10 "high-definition" (multi-object adaptive optics, MOAO) integral-field units, optimised to investigate the physics of the sources of reionization. The combination of these modes will make MOSAIC the world-leading MOS facility, contributing to all fields of contemporary astronomy, from extra-solar planets, to the study of the halo of the Milky Way and its satellites, and from resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies out to observations of the earliest "first-light" structures in the Universe. It will also study the distribution of the dark and ordinary matter at all scales and epochs of the Universe. Recent studies of critical technical issues such as sky-background subtraction and MOAO have demonstrated that such a MOS is feasible with state-of-the-art technology and techniques. Current studies of the MOSAIC team include further trade-offs on the wavelength coverage, a solution for compensating for the non-telecentric new design of the telescope, and tests of the saturation of skylines especially in the near-IR bands. In the 2020s the E-ELT will become the world's largest optical/IR telescope, and we argue that it has to be equipped as soon as possible with a MOS to provide the most efficient, and likely the best way to follow-up on James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) observations.
  • Building on the comprehensive White Paper on the scientific case for multi-object spectroscopy on the European ELT, we present the top-level instrument requirements that are being used in the Phase A design study of the MOSAIC concept. The assembled cases span the full range of E-ELT science and generally require either 'high multiplex' or 'high definition' observations to best exploit the excellent sensitivity and spatial performance of the telescope. We highlight some of the science studies that are now being used in trade-off studies to inform the capabilities of MOSAIC and its technical design.
  • Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and could thus be a potentially powerful tool to trace cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z < 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the impact of the environment on GRB formation. We study host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z < 1 bright LGRBs. We use the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR) and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplement the data set with previously measured stellar masses M$_{\star}$. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M$_{\star}$ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies.We find that LGRB hosts at z < 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star-formation tracers. By directly comparing metallicity distributions of LGRB hosts and star-forming galaxies, we find a good match between the two populations up to Z $\sim 8.4-8.5$, after which the paucity of metal-rich LGRB hosts becomes apparent. The LGRB host galaxies of our complete sample are not inconsistent with the mass-metallicity relation at similar mean redshift and stellar masses. The cutoff against high metallicities (and high masses) can explain the low SFR values of LGRB hosts. We find a hint of increased incidence of starburst galaxies in the Swift/BAT6 z < 1 sample with respect to that of a field star-forming population. Given that the SFRs are low on average, the latter is ascribed to low stellar masses. Nevertheless the limits on the completeness and metallicity availability of current surveys, coupled with the limited number of LGRB host galaxies, prevent us from reaching more quantitative conclusions.
  • LGRBs are associated with massive stars and are therefore linked to star formation. The conditions necessary to produce LGRBs can affect the relation between the LGRB rate and star formation. By using the power of a complete LGRB sample, our aim is to understand whether such a bias exists and, if it does, what is its origin. In this first paper, we build the SED of the z<1 host galaxies of the BAT6 LGRB sample, and determine their stellar masses from SED fitting. We compare the resulting stellar mass distribution (i) with star-forming galaxies observed in deep surveys (UltraVISTA); (ii) with semi-analitical models of the z<1 star forming galaxy population and (iii) with numerical simulations of LGRB hosts having different metallicity thresholds for the progenitor star environment. We find that at z<1 LGRBs tend to avoid massive galaxies and are powerful in selecting faint low-mass star-forming galaxies. The stellar mass distribution of the hosts is not consistent with that of the UltraVISTA star-forming galaxies weighted for their SFR. This implies that, at least at z<1, LGRBs are not unbiased tracers of star formation. To make the two distributions consistent, a much steeper faint-end of the mass function would be required, or a very shallow SFR-Mass relation for the low mass galaxy population. GRB host galaxy simulations indicates that, to reproduce the stellar mass distribution, a metallicity threshold of the order of Z_th=0.3-0.5Z_sun is necessary. Models without a metallicity threshold or with an extreme threshold of Z_th = 0.1Z_sun are excluded at z<1. The use of the BAT6 complete sample makes this result not affected by possible biases which could have influenced past results based on incomplete samples. The preference for low metallicities (Z<~0.5Z_sun) can be a consequence of the particular conditions needed for the progenitor star to produce a GRB. (Abridged)
  • Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR 7, we investigate the environment, morphology and stellar population of bulgeless low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in a volume-limited sample with redshift ranging from 0.024 to 0.04 and $M_r$ $\leq$ $-18.8$. The local density parameter $\Sigma_5$ is used to trace their environments. We find that, for bulgeless galaxies, the surface brightness does not depend on the environment. The stellar populations are compared for bulgeless LSB galaxies in different environments and for bulgeless LSB galaxies with different morphologies. The stellar populations of LSB galaxies in low density regions are similar to those of LSB galaxies in high density regions. Irregular LSB galaxies have more young stars and are more metal-poor than regular LSB galaxies. These results suggest that the evolution of LSB galaxies may be driven by their dynamics including mergers rather than by their large scale environment.
  • The fraction of distant disks and mergers is still debated, while 3D-spectroscopy is revolutionizing the field. However its limited spatial resolution imposes a complimentary HST imagery and a robust analysis procedure. When applied to observations of IMAGES galaxies at z=0.4-0.8, it reveals that half of the spiral progenitors were in a merger phase, 6 billion year ago. The excellent correspondence between methodologically-based classifications of morphologies and kinematics definitively probes a violent origin of disk galaxies as proposed by Hammer et al. (2005). Examination of nearby galaxy outskirts reveals fossil imprints of such ancient merger events, under the form of well organized stellar streams. Perhaps our neighbor, M31, is the best illustration of an ancient merger, which modeling in 2010 leads to predict the gigantic plane of satellites discovered by Ibata et al. (2013). There are still a lot of discoveries to be done until the ELT era, which will open an avenue for detailed and accurate 3D-spectroscopy of galaxies from the earliest epochs to the present.
  • Over the past 18 months we have revisited the science requirements for a multi-object spectrograph (MOS) for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These efforts span the full range of E-ELT science and include input from a broad cross-section of astronomers across the ESO partner countries. In this contribution we summarise the key cases relating to studies of high-redshift galaxies, galaxy evolution, and stellar populations, with a more expansive presentation of a new case relating to detection of exoplanets in stellar clusters. A general requirement is the need for two observational modes to best exploit the large (>40 sq. arcmin) patrol field of the E-ELT. The first mode ('high multiplex') requires integrated-light (or coarsely resolved) optical/near-IR spectroscopy of >100 objects simultaneously. The second ('high definition'), enabled by wide-field adaptive optics, requires spatially-resolved, near-IR of >10 objects/sub-fields. Within the context of the conceptual study for an ELT-MOS called MOSAIC, we summarise the top-level requirements from each case and introduce the next steps in the design process.
  • The relation between the star formation rate and the stellar mass of star-forming galaxies has been used to argue that major mergers cannot be the main driver of star formation. Here, we re-examine these arguments using the representative IMAGES-CDFS sample of star-forming galaxies at z=0.4-0.75, taking advantage of their previously established classification into pre-fusion, fusion, and relaxing galaxy mergers. Contrary to previous claims, we show there is no tension between the main sequence scatter and the average duration of the fusion star formation rate SFR peak. We confirm previous estimates of the fraction of SFR due to morphologically-selected galaxies (~23%) or the SFR enhancement due to major merger during the fusion phase (~10%). However, galaxy mergers are not instantaneous processes, which implies that the total fraction of the SFR associated to galaxies undergoing major mergers must account for the three merger phases. When doing so, galaxies involved in major mergers are found to represent 53-88% of the total SFR at z~0.6. The fraction of LIRGs in the fusion phase is found to be in agreement with the observed morphological fraction of LIRGs without disks and with the observed and expected major merger rates at z<1.5.
  • MOONS is a new conceptual design for a Multi-Object Optical and Near-infrared Spectrograph for the Very Large Telescope (VLT), selected by ESO for a Phase A study. The baseline design consists of 1000 fibers deployable over a field of view of 500 square arcmin, the largest patrol field offered by the Nasmyth focus at the VLT. The total wavelength coverage is 0.8um-1.8um and two resolution modes: medium resolution and high resolution. In the medium resolution mode (R=4,000-6,000) the entire wavelength range 0.8um-1.8um is observed simultaneously, while the high resolution mode covers simultaneously three selected spectral regions: one around the CaII triplet (at R=8,000) to measure radial velocities, and two regions at R=20,000 one in the J-band and one in the H-band, for detailed measurements of chemical abundances. The grasp of the 8.2m Very Large Telescope (VLT) combined with the large multiplex and wavelength coverage of MOONS - extending into the near-IR - will provide the observational power necessary to study galaxy formation and evolution over the entire history of the Universe, from our Milky Way, through the redshift desert and up to the epoch of re-ionization at z>8-9. At the same time, the high spectral resolution mode will allow astronomers to study chemical abundances of stars in our Galaxy, in particular in the highly obscured regions of the Bulge, and provide the necessary follow-up of the Gaia mission. Such characteristics and versatility make MOONS the long-awaited workhorse near-IR MOS for the VLT, which will perfectly complement optical spectroscopy performed by FLAMES and VIMOS.
  • The detection and characterization of the physical properties of very distant galaxies will be one the prominent science case of all future Extremely Large Telescopes, including the 39m E-ELT. Multi-Object Spectroscopic instruments are potentially very important tools for studying these objects, and in particular fiber-based concepts. However, detecting and studying such faint and distant sources will require subtraction of the sky background signal (i.e., between OH airglow lines) with an accuracy of ~1%. This requires a precise and accurate knowledge of the sky background temporal and spatial fluctuations. Using FORS2 narrow-band filter imaging data, we are currently investigating what are the fluctuations of the sky background at ~9000A. We present preliminary results of sky background fluctuations from this study over spatial scales reaching ~4 arcmin, as well as first glimpses into the temporal variations of such fluctuations over timescales of the order of the hour. This study (and other complementary on-going studies) will be essential in designing the next-generation fiber-fed instruments for the E-ELT.
  • The EAGLE and EVE Phase A studies for instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) originated from related top-level scientific questions, but employed different (yet complementary) methods to deliver the required observations. We re-examine the motivations for a multi-object spectrograph (MOS) on the E-ELT and present a unified set of requirements for a versatile instrument. Such a MOS would exploit the excellent spatial resolution in the near-infrared envisaged for EAGLE, combined with aspects of the spectral coverage and large multiplex of EVE. We briefly discuss the top-level systems which could satisfy these requirements in a single instrument at one of the Nasmyth foci of the E-ELT.
  • About two-thirds of present-day, large galaxies are spirals such as the Milky Way or Andromeda, but the way their thin rotating disks formed remains uncertain. Observations have revealed that half of their progenitors, six billion years ago, had peculiar morphologies and/or kinematics, which exclude them from the Hubble sequence. Major mergers, i.e., fusions between galaxies of similar mass, are found to be the likeliest driver for such strong peculiarities. However, thin disks are fragile and easily destroyed by such violent collisions, which creates a critical tension between the observed fraction of thin disks and their survival within the L-CDM paradigm. Here we show that the observed high occurrence of mergers amongst their progenitors is only apparent and is resolved when using morpho-kinematic observations which are sensitive to all the phases of the merging process. This provides an original way of narrowing down observational estimates of the galaxy merger rate and leads to a perfect match with predictions by state-of-the-art L-CDM semi-empirical models with no particular fine-tuning needed. These results imply that half of local thin disks do not survive but are actually rebuilt after a gas-rich major merger occurring in the past nine billion years, i.e., two-thirds of the lifetime of the Universe. This emphasizes the need to study how thin disks can form in halos with a more active merger history than previously considered, and to investigate what is the origin of the gas reservoir from which local disks would reform.
  • Using a representative sample of 65 intermediate mass galaxies at z \sim 0.6, we have inves- tigated the interplay between the main ingredients of chemical evolution: metal abundance, gas mass, stellar mass and SFR. All quantities have been estimated using deep spectroscopy and photometry from UV to IR and assuming an inversion of the Schmitt-Kennicutt law for the gas fraction. Six billion years ago, galaxies had a mean gas fraction of 32% \pm 3, i.e. twice that of their local counterparts. Using higher redshift samples from the literature, we explore the gas-phases and estimate the evolution of the mean gas fraction of distant galaxies over the last 11 Gy. The gas fraction increases linearly at the rate of 4% per Gyr from z \sim 0 to z \sim 2.2. We also demonstrate for a statistically representative sample that < 4% of the z \sim 0.6 galaxies are undergoing outflow events, in sharp contrast with z \sim 2.2 galaxies. The observed co-evolution of metals and gas over the past 6 Gyr favours a scenario in which the population of intermediate mass galaxies evolved as closed-systems, converting their own gas reservoirs into stars.
  • Using the deepest and the most complete set of observations of distant galaxies, we investigate how extended disks could have formed. Observations include spatially-resolved kinematics, detailed morphologies and photometry from UV to mid-IR. Six billion years ago, half of the present-day spiral progenitors had anomalous kinematics and morphologies, as well as relatively high gas fractions. We argue that gas-rich major mergers, i.e., fusions between gas-rich disk galaxies of similar mass, can be the likeliest driver for such strong peculiarities. This suggests a new channel of disk formation, e.g. many disks could be reformed after gas-rich mergers. This is found to be in perfect agreement with predictions from the state-of-the-art LCDM semi-empirical models: due to our sensitivity in detecting mergers at all phases, from pairs to relaxed post-mergers, we find a more accurate merger rate. The scenario can be finally confronted to properties of nearby galaxies, including M31 and galaxies showing ultra-faint, gigantic structures in their haloes.
  • We perform a detailed study of the gamma-ray burst GRB091127/SN2009nz host galaxy at z=0.490 using the VLT/X-shooter spectrograph in slit and integral-field unit (IFU). From the analysis of the optical and X-ray afterglow data obtained from ground-based telescopes and Swift-XRT we confirm the presence of a bump associated with SN2009nz and find evidence of a possible jet break in the afterglow lightcurve. The X-shooter afterglow spectra reveal several emission lines from the underlying host, from which we derive its integrated properties. These are in agreement with those of previously studied GRB-SN hosts and, more generally, with those of the long GRB host population. We use the Hubble Space Telescope and ground based images of the host to determine its stellar mass (M_star). Our results extend to lower M_star values the M-Z plot derived for the sample of long GRB hosts at 0.3<z<1.0 adding new information to probe the faint end of the M-Z relation and the shift of the LGRB host M-Z relation from that found from emission line galaxy surveys. Thanks to the IFU spectroscopy we can build the 2D velocity, velocity dispersion and star formation rate (SFR) maps. They show that the host galaxy has a perturbed rotation kinematics with evidence of a SFR enhancement consistent with the afterglow position.
  • Scaling relations are salient ingredients of galaxy evolution and formation models. I summarize results from the IMAGES survey, which combines spatially-resolved kinematics from FLAMES/GIRAFFE with imaging from HST/ACS and other facilities. Specifically, I will focus on the evolution of the stellar mass and baryonic Tully-Fisher Relations (TFR) from z=0.6 down to z=0. We found a significant evolution in zero point and scatter of the stellar mass TFR compared to the local Universe. Combined with gas fractions derived by inverting the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation, we derived for the first time a baryonic TFR at high redshift. Conversely to the stellar mass TFR, the baryonic relation does not appear to evolve in zero point, which suggests that most of the reservoir of gas converted into stars over the past 6 Gyr was already gravitationally bound to galaxies at z=0.6.
  • We investigated a scenario in which M31 could be the remnant of a major merger and at the origin of the LMC. Galaxy merger simulations were run in order to reproduce some M31 properties. We succeeded in reproducing some of the most important M31 large-scale features like the thick disk or the polar ring, and gave a possible explanation for the formation of the Giant Stream. We also found that the LMC could be expelled by this high energetic phenomenon.
  • We present simulated J-band spectroscopy of red giants and supergiants with a 42m European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), using tools developed toward the EAGLE Phase A instrument study. The simulated spectra are used to demonstrate the validity of the 1.15-1.22 micron region to recover accurate stellar metallicities from Solar and metal-poor (one tenth Solar) spectral templates. From tests at spectral resolving powers of four and ten thousand, we require continuum signal-to-noise ratios in excess of 50 (per two-pixel resolution element) to recover the input metallicity to within 0.1 dex. We highlight the potential of direct estimates of stellar metallicites (over the range -1<[Fe/H]<0) of red giants with the E-ELT, reaching out to distances of ~5 Mpc for stars near the tip of the red giant branch. The same simulations are also used to illustrate the potential for quantitative spectroscopy of red supergiants beyond the Local Volume to tens of Mpc. Calcium triplet observations in the I-band are also simulated to provide a comparison with contemporary techniques. Assuming the EAGLE instrument parameters and simulated performances from adaptive optics, the J-band method is more sensitive in terms of recovering metallicity estimates for a given target. This appears very promising for ELT studies of red giants and supergiants, offering a direct metallicity tracer at a wavelength which is less afffected by extinction than shortward diagnostics and, via adaptive optics, with better image quality.
  • We present a new method to subtract sky light from faint object observations with fiber-fed spectrographs. The algorithm has been developed in the framework of the phase A of OPTIMOS-EVE, an optical-to-IR multi-object spectrograph for the future european extremely large telescope (E-ELT). The new technique overcomes the apparent limitation of fiber-fed instrument to recover with high accuracy the sky contribution. The algorithm is based on the reconstruction of the spatial fluctuations of the sky background (both continuum and emission) and allows us to subtract the sky background contribution in an FoV of $7\times7 arcmin^2$ with an accuracy of 1% in the mono-fibers mode, and 0.3-0.4% for integral-field-unit observations.
  • EAGLE is a Phase A study of a multi-IFU, near-IR spectrometer for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). The design employs wide-field adaptive optics to deliver excellent image quality across a large (38.5 arcmin sq.) field. When combined with the light grasp of the E-ELT, EAGLE will be a unique and efficient facility for spatially-resolved, spectroscopic surveys of high-redshift galaxies and resolved stellar populations. Following a brief overview of the science case, here we summarise the functional and performance requirements that flow-down from it, provide illustrative performances from simulated observations, and highlight the strong synergies with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA).