• We aim to investigate the galaxy environment in GAMA Galaxy Groups Catalogue (G3C) using a volume-limited galaxy sample from the Kilo Degree Survey Data Release 3. The k-Nearest Neighbour technique is adapted to take into account the probability density functions (PDFs) of photometric redshifts in our calculations. This algorithm was tested on simulated KiDS tiles, showing its capability of recovering the relation between galaxy colour, luminosity and local environment. The characterization of the galaxy environment in G3C groups shows systematically steeper density contrasts for more massive groups. The red galaxy fraction gradients in these groups is evident for most of group mass bins. The density contrast of red galaxies is systematically higher at group centers when compared to blue galaxy ones. In addition, distinct group center definitions are used to show that our results are insensitive to center definitions. These results confirm the galaxy evolution scenario which environmental mechanisms are responsible for a slow quenching process as galaxies fall into groups and clusters, resulting in a smooth observed colour gradients in galaxy systems.
  • For a sample of star forming galaxies in the redshift interval 0.15$<$z$<$0.3, we study how both the relative strength of the AGN infra-red emission, compared to that due to the star formation (SF), and the numerical fraction of AGNs, change as a function of the total stellar mass of the hosting galaxy group (M$^{*}_{\mathrm{group}}$), between $10^{10.25}$ and $10^{11.9}$M$_{\odot}$. Using a multi-component SED fitting analysis, we separate the contribution of stars, AGN torus and star formation to the total emission at different wavelengths. This technique is applied to a new multi-wavelength data-set in the SIMES field (23 not redundant photometric bands), spanning the wavelength range from the UV (GALEX) to the far-IR (Herschel) and including crucial AKARI and WISE mid-IR observations (4.5 \mu m$<\lambda<$24 \mu m), where the BH thermal emission is stronger. This new photometric catalog, that includes our best photo-z estimates, is released through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). Groups are identified through a friends of friends algorithm ($\sim$62% purity, $\sim$51% completeness). We identified a total of 45 galaxies requiring an AGN emission component, 35 of which in groups and 10 in the field. We find BHAR$\propto ($M$^{*}_{\mathrm{group}})^{1.21\pm0.27}$ and (BHAR/SFR)$\propto ($M$^{*}_{\mathrm{group}})^{1.04\pm0.24}$ while, in the same range of M$^{*}_{\mathrm{group}}$, we do not observe any sensible change in the numerical fraction of AGNs. Our results indicate that the nuclear activity (i.e. the BHAR and the BHAR/SFR ratio) is enhanced when galaxies are located in more massive and richer groups.
  • We describe the observing strategy, data reduction tools and early results of a supernova (SN) search project, named SUDARE, conducted with the ESO VST telescope aimed at measuring the rate of the different types of SNe in the redshift range 0.2<z<0.8. The search was performed in two of the best-studied extragalactic fields, CDFS and COSMOS, for which a wealth of ancillary data are available in the literature or public archives. (abridged) We obtained a final sample of 117 SNe, most of which are SNIa (57%) and the remaining core collapse events of which 44% type II, 22% type IIn and 34% type Ib/c. In order to link the transients, we built a catalog of ~1.3x10^5 galaxies in the redshift range 0<z<1 with a limiting magnitude K_AB=23.5 mag. We measured the SN rate per unit volume for SN Ia and core collapse SNe in different bin of redshifts. The values are consistent with other measurements from the literature. The dispersion of the rate measurements for SNe Ia is comparable with the scatter of the theoretical tracks for single (SD) and double degenerate (DD) binary systems models, therefore the data do not allow to disentangle among the two different progenitor scenarios. However, we may notice that among the three tested models, SD and two flavours of DD, either with a steep (DDC) or a wide (DDW) delay time distribution, the SD gives a better fit across the whole redshift range whereas the DDC better matches the steep rise up to redshift ~1.2. The DDW appears instead less favoured. The core collapse SN rate is fully consistent, unlike recent claims, with the prediction based on recent estimates of the star formation history, and standard progenitor mass range.
  • We report the results of deep optical follow-up surveys of the first two gravitational-wave sources, GW150914 and GW151226, done by the GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm Collaboration (GRAWITA). The VLT Survey Telescope (VST) responded promptly to the gravitational-wave alerts sent by the LIGO and Virgo Collaborations, monitoring a region of $90$ deg$^2$ and $72$ deg$^2$ for GW150914 and GW151226, respectively, and repeated the observations over nearly two months. Both surveys reached an average limiting magnitude of about 21 in the $r-$band. The paper describes the VST observational strategy and two independent procedures developed to search for transient counterpart candidates in multi-epoch VST images. Several transients have been discovered but no candidates are recognized to be related to the gravitational-wave events. Interestingly, among many contaminant supernovae, we find a possible correlation between the supernova VSTJ57.77559-59.13990 and GRB150827A detected by {\it Fermi}-GBM. The detection efficiency of VST observations for different types of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave events are evaluated for the present and future follow-up surveys.
  • We study the dark matter (DM) assembly in the central regions of massive early-type galaxies up to $z\sim 0.65$. We use a sample of $\sim 3800$ massive ($\log M_{\rm \star}/M_{\rm \odot} > 11.2$) galaxies with photometry and structural parameters from 156 sq. deg. of the Kilo Degree Survey, and spectroscopic redshifts and velocity dispersions from SDSS. We obtain central total-to-stellar mass ratios, $M_{\rm dyn}/M_{\rm \star}$, and DM fractions, by determining dynamical masses, $M_{\rm dyn}$, from Jeans modelling of SDSS aperture velocity dispersions and stellar masses, $M_{\rm \star}$, from KiDS galaxy colours. We first show how the central DM fraction correlates with structural parameters, mass and density proxies, and demonstrate that most of the local correlations are still observed up to $z \sim 0.65$; at fixed $M_{\rm \star}$, local galaxies have larger DM fraction, on average, than their counterparts at larger redshift. We also interpret these trends with a non universal Initial Mass Function (IMF), finding a strong evolution with redshift, which contrast independent observations and is at odds with the effect of galaxy mergers. For a fixed IMF, the galaxy assembly can be explained, realistically, by mass and size accretion, which can be physically achieved by a series of minor mergers. We reproduce both the $R_{\rm e}-M_{\rm \star}$ and $M_{\rm dyn}/M_{\rm \star}-M_{\rm \star}$ evolution with stellar and dark mass changing at a different rate. This result suggests that the main progenitor galaxy is merging with less massive systems, characterized by a smaller $M_{\rm dyn}/M_{\rm \star}$, consistently with results from halo abundance matching.
  • The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is an ongoing optical wide-field imaging survey with the OmegaCAM camera at the VLT Survey Telescope. It aims to image 1500 square degrees in four filters (ugri). The core science driver is mapping the large-scale matter distribution in the Universe, using weak lensing shear and photometric redshift measurements. Further science cases include galaxy evolution, Milky Way structure, detection of high-redshift clusters, and finding rare sources such as strong lenses and quasars. Here we present the third public data release (DR3) and several associated data products, adding further area, homogenized photometric calibration, photometric redshifts and weak lensing shear measurements to the first two releases. A dedicated pipeline embedded in the Astro-WISE information system is used for the production of the main release. Modifications with respect to earlier releases are described in detail. Photometric redshifts have been derived using both Bayesian template fitting, and machine-learning techniques. For the weak lensing measurements, optimized procedures based on the THELI data reduction and lensfit shear measurement packages are used. In DR3 stacked ugri images, weight maps, masks, and source lists for 292 new survey tiles (~300 sq.deg) are made available. The multi-band catalogue, including homogenized photometry and photometric redshifts, covers the combined DR1, DR2 and DR3 footprint of 440 survey tiles (447 sq.deg). Limiting magnitudes are typically 24.3, 25.1, 24.9, 23.8 (5 sigma in a 2 arcsec aperture) in ugri, respectively, and the typical r-band PSF size is less than 0.7 arcsec. The photometric homogenization scheme ensures accurate colors and an absolute calibration stable to ~2% for gri and ~3% in u. Separately released are a weak lensing shear catalogue and photometric redshifts based on two different machine-learning techniques.
  • We present the VST Optical Imaging of the CDFS and ES1 Fields (VOICE) Survey, a VST INAF Guaranteed Time program designed to provide optical coverage of two 4 deg$^2$ cosmic windows in the Southern hemisphere. VOICE provides the first, multi-band deep optical imaging of these sky regions, thus complementing and enhancing the rich legacy of longer-wavelength surveys with VISTA, Spitzer, Herschel and ATCA available in these areas and paving the way for upcoming observations with facilities such as the LSST, MeerKAT and the SKA. VOICE exploits VST's OmegaCAM optical imaging capabilities and completes the reduction of WFI data available within the ES1 fields as part of the ESO-Spitzer Imaging Extragalactic Survey (ESIS) program providing $ugri$ and $uBVR$ coverage of 4 and 4 deg$^2$ areas within the CDFS and ES1 field respectively. We present the survey's science rationale and observing strategy, the data reduction and multi-wavelength data fusion pipeline. Survey data products and their future updates will be released at http://www.mattiavaccari.net/voice/ and on CDS/VizieR.
  • In this paper, we present the tools used to search for galaxy clusters in the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), and our first results. The cluster detection is based on an implementation of the optimal filtering technique that enables us to identify clusters as over-densities in the distribution of galaxies using their positions on the sky, magnitudes, and photometric redshifts. The contamination and completeness of the cluster catalog are derived using mock catalogs based on the data themselves. The optimal signal to noise threshold for the cluster detection is obtained by randomizing the galaxy positions and selecting the value that produces a contamination of less than 20%. Starting from a subset of clusters detected with high significance at low redshifts, we shift them to higher redshifts to estimate the completeness as a function of redshift: the average completeness is ~ 85%. An estimate of the mass of the clusters is derived using the richness as a proxy. We obtained 1858 candidate clusters with redshift 0 < z_c < 0.7 and mass 13.5 < log(M500/Msun) < 15 in an area of 114 sq. degrees (KiDS ESO-DR2). A comparison with publicly available Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-based cluster catalogs shows that we match more than 50% of the clusters (77% in the case of the redMaPPer catalog). We also cross-matched our cluster catalog with the Abell clusters, and clusters found by XMM and in the Planck-SZ survey; however, only a small number of them lie inside the KiDS area currently available.
  • We present cosmological parameter constraints from a tomographic weak gravitational lensing analysis of ~450deg$^2$ of imaging data from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). For a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmology with a prior on $H_0$ that encompasses the most recent direct measurements, we find $S_8\equiv\sigma_8\sqrt{\Omega_{\rm m}/0.3}=0.745\pm0.039$. This result is in good agreement with other low redshift probes of large scale structure, including recent cosmic shear results, along with pre-Planck cosmic microwave background constraints. A $2.3$-$\sigma$ tension in $S_8$ and `substantial discordance' in the full parameter space is found with respect to the Planck 2015 results. We use shear measurements for nearly 15 million galaxies, determined with a new improved `self-calibrating' version of $lens$fit validated using an extensive suite of image simulations. Four-band $ugri$ photometric redshifts are calibrated directly with deep spectroscopic surveys. The redshift calibration is confirmed using two independent techniques based on angular cross-correlations and the properties of the photometric redshift probability distributions. Our covariance matrix is determined using an analytical approach, verified numerically with large mock galaxy catalogues. We account for uncertainties in the modelling of intrinsic galaxy alignments and the impact of baryon feedback on the shape of the non-linear matter power spectrum, in addition to the small residual uncertainties in the shear and redshift calibration. The cosmology analysis was performed blind. Our high-level data products, including shear correlation functions, covariance matrices, redshift distributions, and Monte Carlo Markov Chains are available at http://kids.strw.leidenuniv.nl.
  • This is the second paper of a series in which we present measurements of the Supernova (SN) rates from the SUDARE survey. In this paper, we study the trend of the SN rates with the intrinsic colours, the star formation activity and the mass of the parent galaxies. We have considered a sample of about 130000 galaxies and a SN sample of about 50 events. We found that the SN Ia rate per unit mass is higher by a factor of six in the star-forming galaxies with respect to the passive galaxies. The SN Ia rate per unit mass is also higher in the less massive galaxies that are also younger. These results suggest a distribution of the delay times (DTD) less populated at long delay times than at short delays. The CC SN rate per unit mass is proportional to both the sSFR and the galaxy mass. The trends of the Type Ia and CC SN rates as a function of the sSFR and the galaxy mass that we observed from SUDARE data are in agreement with literature results at different redshifts. The expected number of SNe Ia is in agreement with the observed one for all four DTD models considered both in passive and star-forming galaxies so we can not discriminate between different progenitor scenarios. The expected number of CC SNe is higher than the observed one, suggesting a higher limit for the minimum progenitor mass. We also compare the expected and observed trends of the SN Ia rate with the intrinsic U - J colour of the parent galaxy, assumed as a tracer of the age distribution. While the slope of the relation between the SN Ia rate and the U - J color in star-forming galaxies can be reproduced well by all four DTD models considered, only the steepest of them is able to account for the rates and colour in star-forming and passive galaxies with the same value of the SN Ia production efficiency.
  • In this paper, we present a new method to select the faint, background galaxies used to derive the mass of galaxy clusters by weak lensing. The method is based on the simultaneous analysis of the shear signal, that should be consistent with zero for the foreground, unlensed galaxies, and of the colors of the galaxies: photometric data from the COSMic evOlution Survey are used to train the color selection. In order to validate this methodology, we test it against a set of state-of-the-art image simulations of mock galaxy clusters in different redshift [$0.23-0.45$] and mass [$0.5-1.55\times10^{15}M_\odot$] ranges, mimicking medium-deep multicolor imaging observations (e.g. SUBARU, LBT). The performance of our method in terms of contamination by unlensed sources is comparable to a selection based on photometric redshifts, which however requires a good spectral coverage and is thus much more observationally demanding. The application of our method to simulations gives an average ratio between estimated and true masses of $\sim 0.98 \pm 0.09$. As a further test, we finally apply our method to real data, and compare our results with other weak lensing mass estimates in the literature: for this purpose we choose the cluster Abell 2219 ($z=0.228$), for which multi-band (BVRi) data are publicly available.
  • The abundance of compact, massive, early-type galaxies (ETGs) provides important constraints to galaxy formation scenarios. Thanks to the area covered, depth, excellent spatial resolution and seeing, the ESO Public optical Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), carried out with the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), offers a unique opportunity to conduct a complete census of the most compact galaxies in the Universe. This paper presents a first census of such systems from the first 156 square degrees of KiDS. Our analysis relies on g-, r-, and i-band effective radii ($R_{\rm e}$), derived by fitting galaxy images with PSF-convolved S\'ersic models, high-quality photometric redshifts, $z_{\rm phot}$, estimated from machine learning techniques, and stellar masses, $M_{\rm \star}$, calculated from KiDS aperture photometry. After massiveness ($M_{\rm \star} > 8 \times 10^{10}\, \rm M_{\odot}$) and compactness ($R_{\rm e} < 1.5 \, \rm kpc$ in g-, r- and i-bands) criteria are applied, a visual inspection of the candidates plus near-infrared photometry from VIKING-DR1 are used to refine our sample. The final catalog, to be spectroscopically confirmed, consists of 92 systems in the redshift range $z \sim 0.2-0.7$. This sample, which we expect to increase by a factor of ten over the total survey area, represents the first attempt to select massive super-compact ETGs (MSCGs) in KiDS. We investigate the impact of redshift systematics in the selection, finding that this seems to be a major source of contamination in our sample. A preliminary analysis shows that MSCGs exhibit negative internal colour gradients, consistent with a passive evolution of these systems. We find that the number density of MSCGs is only mildly consistent with predictions from simulations at $z>0.2$, while no such system is found at $z < 0.2$.
  • This work makes use of the VST observations to select variable sources. We use also the IR photometry, SED fitting and X-ray information where available to confirm the nature of the AGN candidates. The IR data, available over the full survey area, allow to confirm the consistency of the variability selection with the IR color selection method, while the detection of variability may prove useful to detect the presence of an AGN in IR selected starburst galaxies.
  • One of the most peculiar characteristics of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is their variability over all wavelengths. This property has been used in the past to select AGN samples and is foreseen to be one of the detection techniques applied in future multi-epoch surveys, complementing photometric and spectroscopic methods. In this paper, we aim to construct and characterise an AGN sample using a multi-epoch dataset in the r band from the SUDARE-VOICE survey. Our work makes use of the VST monitoring program of an area surrounding the Chandra Deep Field South to select variable sources. We use data spanning a six month period over an area of 2 square degrees, to identify AGN based on their photometric variability. The selected sample includes 175 AGN candidates with magnitude r < 23 mag. We distinguish different classes of variable sources through their lightcurves, as well as X-ray, spectroscopic, SED, optical and IR information overlapping with our survey. We find that 12% of the sample (21/175) is represented by SN. Of the remaining sources, 4% (6/154) are stars, while 66% (102/154) are likely AGNs based on the available diagnostics. We estimate an upper limit to the contamination of the variability selected AGN sample of about 34%, but we point out that restricting the analysis to the sources with available multi-wavelength ancillary information, the purity of our sample is close to 80% (102 AGN out of 128 non-SN sources with multi-wavelength diagnostics). Our work thus confirms the efficiency of the variability selection method in agreement with our previous work on the COSMOS field; in addition we show that the variability approach is roughly consistent with the infrared selection.
  • The Kilo Degree survey (KiDS) is a large-scale optical imaging survey carried out with the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), which is the ideal tool for galaxy evolution studies. We expect to observe millions of galaxies for which we extract the structural parameters in four wavebands (u, g, r and i). This sample will represent the largest dataset with measured structural parameters up to a redshift $z=0.5$. In this paper we will introduce the sample, and describe the 2D fitting procedure using the 2DPHOT environment and the validation of the parameters with an external catalog.
  • We have started a systematic search of strong lens candidates in the ESO public survey KiDS based on the visual inspection of massive galaxies in the redshift range $0.1<z<0.5$. As a pilot program we have inspected 100 sq. deg., which overlap with SDSS and where there are known lenses to use as a control sample. Taking advantage of the superb image quality of VST/OmegaCAM, the colour information and accurate model subtracted images, we have found 18 new lens candidates, for which spectroscopic confirmation will be needed to confirm their lensing nature and study the mass profile of the lensing galaxies.
  • The ESO Public Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the VLT Survey Telescope and the OmegaCAM camera. KiDS will scan 1500 square degrees in four optical filters (u, g, r, i). Designed to be a weak lensing survey, it is ideal for galaxy evolution studies, thanks to the high spatial resolution of VST, the good seeing and the photometric depth. The surface photometry have provided with structural parameters (e.g. size and S\'ersic index), aperture and total magnitudes have been used to derive photometric redshifts from Machine learning methods and stellar masses/luminositites from stellar population synthesis. Our project aimed at investigating the evolution of the colour and structural properties of galaxies with mass and environment up to redshift $z \sim 0.5$ and more, to put constraints on galaxy evolution processes, as galaxy mergers.
  • We present a mass estimate of the Planck-discovered cluster PLCK G100.2-30.4, derived from a weak lensing analysis of deep SUBARU griz images. We perform a careful selection of the background galaxies using the multi-band imaging data, and undertake the weak lensing analysis on the deep (1hr) r-band image. The shape measurement is based on the KSB algorithm; we adopt the PSFex software to model the Point Spread Function (PSF) across the field and correct for this in the shape measurement. The weak lensing analysis is validated through extensive image simulations. We compare the resulting weak lensing mass profile and total mass estimate to those obtained from our re-analysis of XMM-Newton observations, derived under the hypothesis of hydrostatic equilibrium. The total integrated mass profiles are in remarkably good agreement, agreeing within 1$\sigma$ across their common radial range. A mass $M_{500} \sim 7 \times 10^{14} M_\odot$ is derived for the cluster from our weak lensing analysis. Comparing this value to that obtained from our reanalysis of XMM-Newton data, we obtain a bias factor of (1-b) = 0.8 $\pm$ 0.1. This is compatible within 1$\sigma$ with the value of (1-b) obtained by Planck Collaboration XXIV from their calibration of the bias factor using newly-available weak lensing reconstructed masses.
  • Optical variability has proven to be an effective way of detecting AGNs in imaging surveys, lasting from weeks to years. In the present work we test its use as a tool to identify AGNs in the VST multi-epoch survey of the COSMOS field, originally tailored to detect supernova events. We make use of the multi-wavelength data provided by other COSMOS surveys to discuss the reliability of the method and the nature of our AGN candidates. Our selection returns a sample of 83 AGN candidates; based on a number of diagnostics, we conclude that 67 of them are confirmed AGNs (81% purity), 12 are classified as supernovae, while the nature of the remaining 4 is unknown. For the subsample of AGNs with some spectroscopic classification, we find that Type 1 are prevalent (89%) compared to Type 2 AGNs (11%). Overall, our approach is able to retrieve on average 15% of all AGNs in the field identified by means of spectroscopic or X-ray classification, with a strong dependence on the source apparent magnitude. In particular, the completeness for Type 1 AGNs is 25%, while it drops to 6% for Type 2 AGNs. The rest of the X-ray selected AGN population presents on average a larger r.m.s. variability than the bulk of non variable sources, indicating that variability detection for at least some of these objects is prevented only by the photometric accuracy of the data. We show how a longer observing baseline would return a larger sample of AGN candidates. Our results allow us to assess the usefulness of this AGN selection technique in view of future wide-field surveys.
  • [Abridged] We present a comparison between weak-lensing (WL) and X-ray mass estimates of a sample of numerically simulated clusters. The sample consists on the 20 most massive objects at redshift z=0.25 and Mvir > 5 x 10^{14} Msun h^{-1}. They were found in a cosmological simulation of volume 1 h^{-3} Gpc^3, evolved in the framework of a WMAP-7 normalized cosmology. Each cluster has been resimulated at higher resolution and with more complex gas physics. We processed it thought Skylens and X-MAS to generate optical and X-ray mock observations along three orthogonal projections. The optical simulations include lensing effects on background sources. Standard observational tools and methods of analysis are used to recover the mass profiles of each cluster projection from the mock catalogues. Given the size of our sample, we could also investigate the dependence of the results on cluster morphology, environment, temperature inhomogeneity, and mass. We confirm previous results showing that WL masses obtained from the fit of the cluster tangential shear profiles with NFW functionals are biased low by ~ 5-10% with a large scatter (~10-25%). We show that scatter could be reduced by optimally selecting clusters either having regular morphology or living in substructure-poor environment. The X-ray masses are biased low by a large amount (~25-35%), evidencing the presence of both non-thermal sources of pressure in the ICM and temperature inhomogeneity, but they show a significantly lower scatter than weak-lensing-derived masses. The X-ray mass bias grows from the inner to the outer regions of the clusters. We find that both biases are weakly correlated with the third-order power ratio, while a stronger correlation exists with the centroid shift. Finally, the X-ray bias is strongly connected with temperature inhomogeneities.
  • R. Laureijs, J. Amiaux, S. Arduini, J.-L. Auguères, J. Brinchmann, R. Cole, M. Cropper, C. Dabin, L. Duvet, A. Ealet, B. Garilli, P. Gondoin, L. Guzzo, J. Hoar, H. Hoekstra, R. Holmes, T. Kitching, T. Maciaszek, Y. Mellier, F. Pasian, W. Percival, J. Rhodes, G. Saavedra Criado, M. Sauvage, R. Scaramella, L. Valenziano, S. Warren, R. Bender, F. Castander, A. Cimatti, O. Le Fèvre, H. Kurki-Suonio, M. Levi, P. Lilje, G. Meylan, R. Nichol, K. Pedersen, V. Popa, R. Rebolo Lopez, H.-W. Rix, H. Rottgering, W. Zeilinger, F. Grupp, P. Hudelot, R. Massey, M. Meneghetti, L. Miller, S. Paltani, S. Paulin-Henriksson, S. Pires, C. Saxton, T. Schrabback, G. Seidel, J. Walsh, N. Aghanim, L. Amendola, J. Bartlett, C. Baccigalupi, J.-P. Beaulieu, K. Benabed, J.-G. Cuby, D. Elbaz, P. Fosalba, G. Gavazzi, A. Helmi, I. Hook, M. Irwin, J.-P. Kneib, M. Kunz, F. Mannucci, L. Moscardini, C. Tao, R. Teyssier, J. Weller, G. Zamorani, M.R. Zapatero Osorio, O. Boulade, J. J. Foumond, A. Di Giorgio, P. Guttridge, A. James, M. Kemp, J. Martignac, A. Spencer, D. Walton, T. Blümchen, C. Bonoli, F. Bortoletto, C. Cerna, L. Corcione, C. Fabron, K. Jahnke, S. Ligori, F. Madrid, L. Martin, G. Morgante, T. Pamplona, E. Prieto, M. Riva, R. Toledo, M. Trifoglio, F. Zerbi, F. Abdalla, M. Douspis, C. Grenet, S. Borgani, R. Bouwens, F. Courbin, J.-M. Delouis, P. Dubath, A. Fontana, M. Frailis, A. Grazian, J. Koppenhöfer, O. Mansutti, M. Melchior, M. Mignoli, J. Mohr, C. Neissner, K. Noddle, M. Poncet, M. Scodeggio, S. Serrano, N. Shane, J.-L. Starck, C. Surace, A. Taylor, G. Verdoes-Kleijn, C. Vuerli, O. R. Williams, A. Zacchei, B. Altieri, I. Escudero Sanz, R. Kohley, T. Oosterbroek, P. Astier, D. Bacon, S. Bardelli, C. Baugh, F. Bellagamba, C. Benoist, D. Bianchi, A. Biviano, E. Branchini, C. Carbone, V. Cardone, D. Clements, S. Colombi, C. Conselice, G. Cresci, N. Deacon, J. Dunlop, C. Fedeli, F. Fontanot, P. Franzetti, C. Giocoli, J. Garcia-Bellido, J. Gow, A. Heavens, P. Hewett, C. Heymans, A. Holland, Z. Huang, O. Ilbert, B. Joachimi, E. Jennins, E. Kerins, A. Kiessling, D. Kirk, R. Kotak, O. Krause, O. Lahav, F. van Leeuwen, J. Lesgourgues, M. Lombardi, M. Magliocchetti, K. Maguire, E. Majerotto, R. Maoli, F. Marulli, S. Maurogordato, H. McCracken, R. McLure, A. Melchiorri, A. Merson, M. Moresco, M. Nonino, P. Norberg, J. Peacock, R. Pello, M. Penny, V. Pettorino, C. Di Porto, L. Pozzetti, C. Quercellini, M. Radovich, A. Rassat, N. Roche, S. Ronayette, E. Rossetti, B. Sartoris, P. Schneider, E. Semboloni, S. Serjeant, F. Simpson, C. Skordis, G. Smadja, S. Smartt, P. Spano, S. Spiro, M. Sullivan, A. Tilquin, R. Trotta, L. Verde, Y. Wang, G. Williger, G. Zhao, J. Zoubian, E. Zucca
    Oct. 14, 2011 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.GA
    Euclid is a space-based survey mission from the European Space Agency designed to understand the origin of the Universe's accelerating expansion. It will use cosmological probes to investigate the nature of dark energy, dark matter and gravity by tracking their observational signatures on the geometry of the universe and on the cosmic history of structure formation. The mission is optimised for two independent primary cosmological probes: Weak gravitational Lensing (WL) and Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO). The Euclid payload consists of a 1.2 m Korsch telescope designed to provide a large field of view. It carries two instruments with a common field-of-view of ~0.54 deg2: the visual imager (VIS) and the near infrared instrument (NISP) which contains a slitless spectrometer and a three bands photometer. The Euclid wide survey will cover 15,000 deg2 of the extragalactic sky and is complemented by two 20 deg2 deep fields. For WL, Euclid measures the shapes of 30-40 resolved galaxies per arcmin2 in one broad visible R+I+Z band (550-920 nm). The photometric redshifts for these galaxies reach a precision of dz/(1+z) < 0.05. They are derived from three additional Euclid NIR bands (Y, J, H in the range 0.92-2.0 micron), complemented by ground based photometry in visible bands derived from public data or through engaged collaborations. The BAO are determined from a spectroscopic survey with a redshift accuracy dz/(1+z) =0.001. The slitless spectrometer, with spectral resolution ~250, predominantly detects Ha emission line galaxies. Euclid is a Medium Class mission of the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme, with a foreseen launch date in 2019. This report (also known as the Euclid Red Book) describes the outcome of the Phase A study.
  • We present the results of our analyses of the X-ray emission and of the strong lensing systems in the relaxed galaxy cluster Abell 611 (z=0.288). We infer the X-ray mass estimate deriving the density and temperature profiles of the intra-cluster medium within the radius r ~ 700 kpc through a non-parametric approach; assuming that the cluster is in hydrostatic equilibrium and adopting a matter density profile, we can recover the total mass distribution of Abell 611 via the X-ray data. We derive the total projected mass in the central region of Abell 611 performing a parametric analysis of its strong lensing features through the publicly available analysis software Lenstool. As a final step we compare the results obtained with both methods. We derive a good agreement between the X-ray and strong lensing total mass estimates in the central region (i.e. within the radius r ~100 kpc), while a marginal disagreement is found between the two mass estimates when extrapolating the strong lensing results in the outer spatial range. We suggest that in this case the X-ray/strong lensing mass disagreement can be explained by an incorrect estimate of the relative contributions of the baryonic component and of the dark matter, caused by the intrinsic degeneracy between the different mass components in the strong lensing analysis. We discuss the effect of some possible systematic errors that influence both mass estimates. We find a slight dependence of the measurements of the X-ray temperatures (and therefore of the X-ray total masses) on the background adopted in the spectral analysis, with total deviations on the value of M_200 of the order of the 1-sigma statistical error. The strong lensing mass results are instead sensitive to the parameterisation of the galactic halo mass in the central regions, in particular to the modelling of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) baryonic component.
  • We model the evolution of the mean galaxy occupation of dark-matter halos over the range $0.1<z<1.3$, using the data from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS). The galaxy projected correlation function $w_p(r_p)$ was computed for a set of luminosity-limited subsamples and fits to its shape were obtained using two variants of Halo Occupation Distribution models. These provide us with a set of best-fitting parameters, from which we obtain the average mass of a halo and average number of galaxies per halo. We find that after accounting for the evolution in luminosity and assuming that we are largely following the same population, the underlying dark matter halo shows a growth in mass with decreasing redshift as expected in a hierarchical structure formation scenario. Using two different HOD models, we see that the halo mass grows by 90% over the redshift interval z=[0.5,1.0]. This is the first time the evolution in halo mass at high redshifts has been obtained from a single data survey and it follows the simple form seen in N-body simulations with $M(z) = M_0 e^{-\beta z}$, and $\beta = 1.3 \pm 0.30$. This provides evidence for a rapid accretion phase of massive halos having a present-day mass $M_0 \sim 10^{13.5} h^{-1} M_\odot$, with a $m > 0.1 M_0$ merger event occuring between redshifts of 0.5 and 1.0. Futhermore, we find that more luminous galaxies are found to occupy more massive halos irrespectively of the redshift. Finally, the average number of galaxies per halo shows little increase from redshift z$\sim$ 1.0 to z$\sim$ 0.5, with a sharp increase by a factor $\sim$3 from z$\sim$ 0.5 to z$\sim$ 0.1, likely due to the dynamical friction of subhalos within their host halos.
  • Aims. The Large Binocular Cameras (LBC) are two twin wide field cameras (FOV ~ 23'x 25') mounted at the prime foci of the 8.4m Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). We performed a weak lensing analysis of the z=0.288 cluster Abell 611 on g-band data obtained by the blue-optimized Large Binocular Camera in order to estimate the cluster mass. Methods. Due to the complexity of the PSF of LBC, we decided to use two different approaches, KSB and Shapelets, to measure the shape of background galaxies and to derive the shear signal produced by the cluster. Then we estimated the cluster mass with both aperture densitometry and parametric model fits. Results. The combination of the large aperture of the telescope and the wide field of view allowed us to map a region well beyond the expected virial radius of the cluster and to get a high surface density of background galaxies (23 galaxies/arcmin^2). This made possible to estimate an accurate mass for Abell 611. We find that the mass within 1.5 Mpc is: $(8\pm3)\times 10^{14} M_\odot$ from the aperture mass technique and $(5\pm1)\times 10^{14} M_\odot$ using the model fitting by a NFW mass density profile, for both Shapelets and KSB methods. This analysis demonstrates that LBC is a powerful instrument for weak gravitational lensing studies.
  • Hierarchical models of galaxy formation predict that the properties of a dark matter halo depend on the large-scale environment surrounding the halo. As a result of this correlation, we expect massive haloes to be present in larger number in overdense regions than in underdense ones. Given that a correlation exists between a galaxy stellar mass and the hosting dark matter halo mass, the segregation in dark matter halo mass should then result in a segregation in the distribution of stellar mass in the galaxy population. In this work we study the distribution of galaxy stellar mass and rest-frame optical color as a function of the large-scale galaxy distribution using the VLT VIMOS Deep Survey sample, in order to verify the presence of segregation in the properties of the galaxy population. We use the VVDS redshift measurements and multi-band photometric data to derive estimates of the stellar mass, rest-frame optical color, and of the large-scale galaxy density, on a scale of approximately 8 Mpc, for a sample of 5619 galaxies in the redshift range 0.2<z<1.4. We observe a significant mass and optical color segregation over the whole redshift interval covered by our sample, such that the median value of the mass distribution is larger and the rest-frame optical color is redder in regions of high galaxy density. The amplitude of the mass segregation changes little with redshift, at least in the high stellar mass regime that we can uniformely sample over the 0.2<z<1.4 redshift interval. The color segregation, instead, decreases significantly for z>0.7. However, when we consider only galaxies in narrow bins of stellar mass, in order to exclude the effects of the stellar mass segregation on the galaxy properties, we do not observe any more any significant color segregation.