• We present a sample of eight cataclysmic variables (CVs) identified among the X-ray sources of the 400 square degree (400d) X-ray ROSAT/PSPC survey. Based on this sample, we have obtained preliminary constraints on the X-ray luminosity function of CVs in the solar neighbourhood in the range of low luminosities, L_X=~1e29-1e30 erg/s (0.5-2 keV). We show that the logarithmic slope of the CV luminosity function in this luminosity range is less steep than that at L_X>1e31 erg/s. Our results show that of order of thousand CVs will be detected in the SRG/eROSITA all-sky survey at high Galactic latitudes, which will allow to obtain much more accurate measurements of their X-ray luminosity function.
  • In this paper we propose and examine a physical mechanism which can lead to the generation of noise in the mass accretion rate of low mass X-ray binaries on time-scales comparable to the orbital period of the system. We consider modulations of mass captured by the compact object from the companion star's stellar wind in binaries with late type giants, systems which usually have long orbital periods. We show that a hydrodynamical interaction of the wind matter within a binary system even without eccentricity results in variability of the mass accretion rate with characteristic time-scales close to the orbital period. The cause of the variability is an undeveloped turbulent motion (perturbed motion without significant vorticity) of wind matter near the compact object. Our conclusions are supported by 3D simulations with two different hydrodynamic codes based on Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches -- the SPH code GADGET and the Eulerian code PLUTO. In this work we assume that the wind mass loss rate of the secondary is at the level of $(0.5-1)\times10^{-7} M_\odot$/year, required to produce observable variations of the mass accretion rate on the primary. This value is higher than that, estimated for single giant stars of this type, but examples of even higher mass loss rate of late type giants in binaries do exist. Our simulations show that the stellar wind matter intercepted by the compact object might create observational appearances similar to that of an accretion disc corona/wind and could be detected via high energy resolution observations of X-ray absorption lines, in particular, highly ionized ions of heavy elements.
  • We estimate the relative contributions of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion disk, corona, and obscuring torus to the bolometric luminosity of Seyfert galaxies, using Spizter mid-infrared (MIR) observations of a complete sample of 68 nearby active galactic nuclei from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray (HX) survey. This is the first HX-selected (above 15 keV) sample of AGNs with complementary high angular resolution, high signal to noise, MIR data. Correcting for the host galaxy contribution, we find a correlation between HX and MIR luminosities: L_MIR L_HX^(0.74+/-0.06). Assuming that the observed MIR emission is radiation from an accretion disk reprocessed in a surrounding dusty torus that subtends a solid angle decreasing with increasing luminosity (as inferred from the declining fraction of obscured AGNs), the intrinsic disk luminosity, L_D, is approximately proportional to the luminosity of the corona in the 2-300 keV energy band, L_C, with the L_D/L_C ratio varying by a factor of 2.1 around a mean value of 1.6. This ratio is a factor of ~2 smaller than for typical quasars producing the cosmic X-ray background (CXB). Therefore, over three orders of magnitude in luminosity, HX radiation carries a large, and roughly comparable, fraction of the bolometric output of AGNs. We estimate the cumulative bolometric luminosity density of local AGNs at ~(1-3)x10^40 erg/s/Mpc^3. Finally, the Compton temperature ranges between kT_c~2 and ~6 keV for nearby AGNs, compared to kT_c~2 keV for typical quasars, confirming that radiative heating of interstellar gas can play an important role in regulating SMBH growth.
  • We present the results of our optical identifications of four hard X-ray sources from the Swift all-sky survey. We obtained optical spectra for each of the program objects with the 6-m BTA telescope (Special Astrophysical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Arkhyz), which allowed their nature to be established. Two sources (SWIFT J2237.2+6324} and SWIFT J2341.0+7645) are shown to belong to the class of cataclysmic variables (suspected polars or intermediate polars). The measured emission line width turns out to be fairly large (FWHM ~ 15-25 A), suggesting the presence of extended, rapidly rotating (v~400-600 km/s) accretion disks in the systems. Apart from line broadening, we have detected a change in the positions of the line centroids for SWIFT J2341.0+7645, which is most likely attributable to the orbital motion of the white dwarf in the binary system. The other two program objects (SWIFT J0003.3+2737 and SWIFT J0113.8+2515) are extragalactic in origin: the first is a Seyfert 2 galaxy and the second is a blazar at redshift z=1.594. Apart from the optical spectra, we provide the X-ray spectra for all sources in the 0.6-10 keV energy band obtained from XRT/Swift data.
  • Chandra has detected optically thin, thermal X-ray emission with a size of ~1 arcsec and luminosity ~10^33 erg/s from the direction of the Galactic supermassive black hole (SMBH), Sgr A*. We suggest that a significant or even dominant fraction of this signal may be produced by several thousand late-type main-sequence stars that possibly hide in the central ~0.1 pc region of the Galaxy. As a result of tidal spin-ups caused by close encounters with other stars and stellar remnants, these stars should be rapidly rotating and hence have hot coronae, emitting copious amounts of X-ray emission with temperatures kT<~ a few keV. The Chandra data thus place an interesting upper limit on the space density of (currently unobservable) low-mass main-sequence stars near Sgr A*. This bound is close to and consistent with current constraints on the central stellar cusp provided by infrared observations. If coronally active stars do provide a significant fraction of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A*, it should be variable on hourly and daily time scales due to giant flares occurring on different stars. Another consequence is that the quiescent X-ray luminosity and accretion rate of the SMBH are yet lower than believed before.
  • We study the statistical properties of faint X-ray sources detected in the Chandra Bulge Field. The unprecedented sensitivity of the Chandra observations allows us to probe the population of faint Galactic X-ray sources down to luminosities L(2-10 keV)~1e30 erg/sec at the Galactic Center distance. We show that the luminosity function of these CBF sources agrees well with the luminosity function of sources in the Solar vicinity (Sazonov et al. 2006). The cumulative luminosity density of sources detected in the CBF in the luminosity range 1e30-1e32 erg/sec per unit stellar mass is L(2-10 keV)/M*=(1.7+/-0.3)e27 erg/sec/Msun. Taking into account sources in the luminosity range 1e32-1e34 erg/sec from Sazonov et al. (2006), the cumulative luminosity density in the broad luminosity range 1e30-1e34 erg/sec becomes L(2-10 keV)/M*=(2.4+/-0.4)e27 erg/sec/Msun. The majority of sources with the faintest luminosities should be active binary stars with hot coronae based on the available luminosity function of X-ray sources in the Solar environment.
  • We present an extended set of model atmospheres and emergent spectra of X-ray bursting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries. Compton scattering is taken into account. The models were computed in LTE approximation for six different chemical compositions: pure hydrogen and pure helium atmospheres, and atmospheres with a solar mix of hydrogen and helium and various heavy elements abundances: Z = 1, 0.3, 0.1, and 0.01 Z_sun, for three values of gravity, log g =14.0, 14.3, and 14.6 and for 20 values of relative luminosity l = L/L_Edd in the range 0.001 - 0.98. The emergent spectra of all models are fitted by diluted blackbody spectra in the observed RXTE/PCA band 3 - 20 keV and the corresponding values of color correction factors f_c are presented. We also show how to use these dependencies to estimate the neutron star's basic parameters.
  • We study simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of three intermediate polars EX Hya, V1223 Sgr and TV Col with the aim to understand the propagation of matter in their accretion flows. We show that in all cases the power spectra of flux variability of binary systems in X-rays and in optical band are similar to each other and the majority of X-ray and optical fluxes are correlated with time lag <1 sec. These findings support the idea that optical emission of accretion disks, in these binary systems,largely originates as reprocessing of X-ray luminosity of their white dwarfs. In the best obtained dataset of EX Hya we see that the optical lightcurve unambiguously contains some component, which leads the X-ray emission by ~7 sec. We interpret this in the framework of the model of propagating fluctuations and thus deduce the time of travel of the matter from the innermost part of the truncated accretion disk to the white dwarf surface. This value agrees very well with the time expected for matter threaded onto the magnetosphere of the white dwarf to fall to its surface. The datasets of V1223 Sgr and TV Col in general confirm these findings,but have poorer quality.
  • We studied the stellar population in the central 6.6x6.6arcmin,region of the ultra-deep (1Msec) Chandra Galactic field - the "Chandra bulge field" (CBF) approximately 1.5 degrees away from the Galactic Center - using the Hubble Space Telescope ACS/WFC blue (F435W) and red (F625W) images. We mainly focus on the behavior of red clump giants - a distinct stellar population, which is known to have an essentially constant intrinsic luminosity and color. By studying the variation in the position of the red clump giants on a spatially resolved color-magnitude diagram, we confirm the anomalous total-to-selective extinction ratio, as reported in previous work for other Galactic bulge fields. We show that the interstellar extinction in this area is <A_(F625W)>= 4 on average, but varies significantly between ~3-5 on angular scales as small as 1 arcminute. Using the distribution of red clump giants in an extinction-corrected color-magnitude diagram, we constrain the shape of a stellar-mass distribution model in the direction of this ultra-deep Chandra field, which will be used in a future analysis of the population of X-ray sources. We also show that the adopted model for the stellar density distribution predicts an infrared surface brightness in the direction of the "Chandra bulge field" in good agreement (i.e. within ~15%) with the actual measurements derived from the Spitzer/IRAC observations.
  • We study the power spectra of the variability of seven intermediate polars containing magnetized asynchronous accreting white dwarfs, XSS J00564+4548,IGR J00234+6141, DO Dra, V1223 Sgr, IGR J15094-6649, IGR J16500-3307 and IGR J17195-4100, in the optical band and demonstrate that their variability can be well described by a model based on fluctuations propagating in a truncated accretion disk. The power spectra have breaks at Fourier frequencies, which we associate with the Keplerian frequency of the disk at the boundary of the white dwarfs' magnetospheres. We propose that the properties of the optical power spectra can be used to deduce the geometry of the inner parts of the accretion disk, in particular: 1) truncation radii of the magnetically disrupted accretion disks in intermediate polars, 2) the truncation radii of the accretion disk in quiescent states of dwarf novae
  • We study power density spectra (PDS) of X-ray flux variability in binary systems where the accretion flow is truncated by the magnetosphere. PDS of accreting X-ray pulsars where the neutron star is close to the corotation with the accretion disk at the magnetospheric boundary, have a distinct break/cutoff at the neutron star spin frequency. This break can naturally be explained in the "perturbation propagation" model, which assumes that at any given radius in the accretion disk stochastic perturbations are introduced to the flow with frequencies characteristic for this radius. These perturbations are then advected to the region of main energy release leading to a self-similar variability of X-ray flux P~f^{-1...-1.5}. The break in the PDS is then a natural manifestation of the transition from the disk to magnetospheric flow at the frequency characteristic for the accretion disk truncation radius (magnetospheric radius). The proximity of the PDS break frequency to the spin frequency in corotating pulsars strongly suggests that the typical variability time scale in accretion disks is close to the Keplerian one. In transient accreting X-ray pulsars characterized by large variations of the mass accretion rate during outbursts, the PDS break frequency follows the variations of the X-ray flux, reflecting the change of the magnetosphere size with the accretion rate. Above the break frequency the PDS steepens to ~f^{-2} law which holds over a broad frequency range. These results suggest that strong f^{-1...-1.5} aperiodic variability which is ubiquitous in accretion disks is not characteristic for magnetospheric flows.
  • We use deep Chandra observations to measure the emissivity of the unresolved X-ray emission in the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379. After elimination of bright, low-mass X-ray binaries with luminosities >10^{36 erg/sec, we find that the remaining unresolved X-ray emission is characterized by an emissivity per unit stellar mass L_x/M_stars ~8.2x10^{27} erg/s/M_sun in the 0.5-2 keV energy band. This value is in good agreement with those previousely determined for the dwarf elliptical galaxy M32, the bulge of the spiral galaxy M31 and the Milky Way, as well as with the integrated X-ray emissivity of cataclysmic variables and coronally active binaries in the Solar neighborhood. This strongly suggests that i) the bulk of the unresolved X-ray emission in NGC 3379 is produced by its old stellar population and ii) the old stellar populations in all galaxies can be characterized by a universal value of X-ray emissivity per unit stellar mass or per unit K band luminosity.
  • We observed 7 INTEGRAL sources with the Chandra X-ray Observatory to refine their localization to ~2 arcsec and to study their X-ray spectra. Two sources are inferred to have a Galactic origin: IGR J08390-4833 is most likely a magnetic cataclysmic variable with a white dwarf spin period ~1,450 s; and IGR J21343+4738 is a high-mass X-ray binary. Five sources (IGR J02466-4222, IGR J09522-6231, IGR J14493-5534, IGR J14561-3738, and IGR J23523+5844) prove to be AGN with significant intrinsic X-ray absorption along the line of sight. Their redshifts and hard X-ray (17-60 keV) luminosities range from 0.025 to 0.25 and from ~2x10^43 to ~2x10^45 erg/s, respectively, with the distance to IGR J14493-5534 remaining unknown. The sources IGR J02466-4222 and IGR J14561-3738 are likely Compton-thick AGN with absorption column densities NH>10^24 cm^-2, and the former further appears to be one of the nearest X-ray bright, optically-normal galaxies. With the newly-identified sources, the number of heavily-obscured (NH>10^24 cm^-2) AGN detected by INTEGRAL has increased to ~10. Therefore, such objects constitute 10-15% of hard X-ray bright, non-blazar AGN in the local Universe. The small ratio (<<1%) of soft (0.5-8.0 keV) to hard (17-60 keV) band fluxes (Chandra to INTEGRAL) and the non-detection of optical narrow-line emission in some of the Compton-thick AGN in our sample suggests that there is a new class of objects in which the central massive black hole may be surrounded by a geometrically-thick dusty torus with a narrow ionization cone.
  • We determine the cumulative spectral energy distribution (SED) of local AGN in the 3-300 keV band and compare it with the spectrum of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) in order to test the widely accepted paradigm that the CXB is a superposition of AGN and to place constraints on AGN evolution. We performed a stacking analysis of the hard X-ray spectra of AGN detected in two recent all-sky surveys, performed by the IBIS/ISGRI instrument aboard INTEGRAL and by the PCA instrument aboard RXTE, taking into account the space densities of AGN with different luminosities and absorption column densities. We derived the collective SED of local AGN in the 3-300 keV energy band. Those AGN with luminosities below 10^43.5 erg/s (17-60 keV) provide the main contribution to the local volume hard X-ray emissivity, at least 5 times more than more luminous objects. The cumulative spectrum exhibits (although with marginal significance) a cutoff at energies above 100-200 keV and is consistent with the CXB spectrum if AGN evolve over cosmic time in such a way that the SED of their collective high-energy emission has a constant shape and the relative fraction of obscured AGN remains nearly constant, while the AGN luminosity density undergoes strong evolution between z~1 and z=0, a scenario broadly consistent with results from recent deep X-ray surveys. The first direct comparison between the collective hard X-ray SED of local AGN and the CXB spectrum demonstrates that the popular concept of the CXB being a superposition of AGN is generally correct. By repeating this test using improved AGN statistics from current and future hard X-ray surveys, it should be possible to tighten the constraints on the cosmic history of black hole growth.
  • We present calculations of the reflection of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) by the Earth's atmosphere in the 1--1000 keV energy range. The calculations include Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescent emission and are based on a realistic chemical composition of the atmosphere. Such calculations are relevant for CXB studies using the Earth as an obscuring screen (as was recently done by INTEGRAL). The Earth's reflectivity is further compared with that of the Sun and the Moon -- the two other objects in the Solar system subtending a large solid angle on the sky, as needed for CXB studies.
  • We perform Monte Carlo simulations of cosmic ray-induced hard X-ray radiation from the Earth's atmosphere. We find that the shape of the spectrum emergent from the atmosphere in the energy range 25-300 keV is mainly determined by Compton scatterings and photoabsorption, and is almost insensitive to the incident cosmic-ray spectrum. We provide a fitting formula for the hard X-ray surface brightness of the atmosphere as would be measured by a satellite-born instrument, as a function of energy, solar modulation level, geomagnetic cutoff rigidity and zenith angle. A recent measurement by the INTEGRAL observatory of the atmospheric hard X-ray flux during the occultation of the cosmic X-ray background by the Earth agrees with our prediction within 10%. This suggests that Earth observations could be used for in-orbit calibration of future hard X-ray telescopes. We also demonstrate that the hard X-ray spectra generated by cosmic rays in the crusts of the Moon, Mars and Mercury should be significantly different from that emitted by the Earth's atmosphere.
  • Using Chandra observations, we study the X-ray emission of the stellar population in the compact dwarf elliptical galaxy M32. The proximity of M32 allows one to resolve all bright point sources with luminosities higher than 8e33 erg/s in the 0.5--7 keV band. The remaining (unresolved) emission closely follows the galaxy's optical light and is characterized by an emissivity per unit stellar mass of ~4.3e27 erg/s/M_sun in the 2--10 keV energy band. The spectrum of the unresolved emission above a few keV smoothly joins the X-ray spectrum of the Milky Way's ridge measured with RXTE and INTEGRAL. These results strongly suggest that weak discrete X-ray sources (accreting white dwarfs and active binary stars) provide the bulk of the ``diffuse'' emission of this gas-poor galaxy. Within the uncertainties, the average X-ray properties of the M32 stars are consistent with those of the old stellar population in the Milky Way. The inferred cumulative soft X-ray (0.5--2 keV) emissivity is however smaller than is measured in the immediate Solar vicinity in our Galaxy. This difference is probably linked to the contribution of young (age <1Gyr) stars, which are abundant in the Solar neighborhood but practically absent in M32. Combining Chandra, RXTE and INTEGRAL data, we obtain a broad-band (0.5--60 keV) X-ray spectrum of the old stellar population in galaxies.
  • We study the spectrum of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) in energy range $\sim$5-100 keV. Early in 2006 the INTEGRAL observatory performed a series of four 30ksec observations with the Earth disk crossing the field of view of the instruments. The modulation of the aperture flux due to occultation of extragalactic objects by the Earth disk was used to obtain the spectrum of the Cosmic X-ray Background(CXB). Various sources of contamination were evaluated, including compact sources, Galactic Ridge emission, CXB reflection by the Earth atmosphere, cosmic ray induced emission by the Earth atmosphere and the Earth auroral emission. The spectrum of the cosmic X-ray background in the energy band 5-100 keV is obtained. The shape of the spectrum is consistent with that obtained previously by the HEAO-1 observatory, while the normalization is $\sim$10% higher. This difference in normalization can (at least partly) be traced to the different assumptions on the absolute flux from the Crab Nebulae. The increase relative to the earlier adopted value of the absolute flux of the CXB near the energy of maximum luminosity (20-50 keV) has direct implications for the energy release of supermassive black holes in the Universe and their growth at the epoch of the CXB origin.
  • We use the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray survey to perform a statistical study of a representative sample of nearby AGN. Our entire all-sky sample consists of 127 AGN, of which 91 are confidently detected (>5 sigma) on the time-averaged map obtained with the IBIS/ISGRI instrument and 36 are detected only during single observations. Among the former there are 66 non-blazar AGN located at |b|>5 deg, where the survey's identification completeness is ~93%, which we use for calculating the AGN luminosity function and X-ray absorption distribution. In broad agreement with previous studies, we find that the fraction of obscured (log NH>22) objects is much higher (~70%) among the low-luminosity AGN (Lx<10^43.6 erg/s) than among the high-luminosity ones (Lx>10^43.6 erg/s), \~25%, where Lx is the luminosity in the 17-60 keV energy band. We also find that locally the fraction of Compton-thick AGN is less than 20% unless there is a significant population of AGN that are so strongly obscured that their observed hard X-ray luminosities fall below 10^40-10^41 erg/s, the effective limit of our survey. The constructed hard X-ray luminosity function has a canonical, smoothly broken power-law shape in the range 40<log Lx<45.5 with a characteristic luminosity of log L*=43.40+/-0.28. The estimated local luminosity density due to AGN with log Lx>40 is (1.4+/-0.3) 10^39 erg/s/Mpc^3 (17-60 keV). We demonstrate that the spectral shape and amplitude of the CXB are consistent with the simple scenario in which the NH distribution of AGN (for a given Lx/L*(z) ratio has not changed significantly since z~1.5, while the AGN luminosity function has experienced pure luminosity evolution.
  • We present analysis of extensive monitoring of SS433 by the RXTE observatory collected over the period 1996-2005. The difference between energy spectra taken at different precessional and orbital phases shows the presence of a strong photoabsorption near the optical star, probably due to its powerful dense wind. Assuming that a precessing accretion disk is thick, we recover the temperature profile in the X-ray emitting jet that best fits the observed precessional variations of the X-ray emission temperature. The hottest visible part of the X-ray jet is located at a distance of $l_0/a\sim0.06-0.09$, or $\sim2-3\times10^{11}$cm from the central compact object and has a temperature of about $T_{\rm max}\sim30$ keV. We discovered appreciable orbital X-ray eclipses at the ``crossover'' precessional phases (jets are in the plane of the sky, disk is edge-on) which put a lower limit on the size of the optical component $R/a\ga0.5$ and an upper limit on a mass ratio of binary companions $q=M_{\rm x}/M_{\rm opt}\la0.3-0.35$. The size of the eclipsing region can be larger than secondary's Roche lobe because of substantial photoabsorption by dense stellar wind. This must be taken into account when evaluating the mass ratio from analysis of X-ray eclipses.
  • We assess the contribution to the X-ray (above 2 keV) luminosity of the Milky Way from different classes of low-mass binary systems and single stars. We begin by using the RXTE Slew Survey of the sky at |b|>10 to construct an X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of nearby X-ray sources in the range 10^30<Lx(erg/s)<10^34 (where Lx is the luminosity over 2-10 keV), occupied by coronally active binaries (ABs) and cataclysmic variables (CVs). We then extend this XLF down to Lx~10^27.5 erg/s using the Rosat All-Sky Survey in soft X-rays and available information on the 0.1-10 keV spectra of typical sources. We find that the local cumulative X-ray (2-10 keV) emissivities (per unit stellar mass) of ABs and CVs are (2.0+/-0.8)x10^27 and (1.1+/-0.3)x10^27 erg/s/Msol, respectively. In addition to ABs and CVs, representing old stellar populations, young stars emit locally (1.5+/-0.4)x10^27 erg/s/Msol. We finally attach to the XLF of ABs and CVs a high luminosity branch (up to ~10^39 erg/s) composed of neutron-star and black-hole low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), derived in previous work. The combined XLF covers ~12 orders of magnitude in luminosity. The estimated combined contribution of ABs and CVs to the 2-10 keV luminosity of the Milky Way is ~2x10^38 erg/s, or ~3% of the integral luminosity of LMXBs (averaged over nearby galaxies). The XLF obtained in this work is used elsewhere (Revnivtsev et al.) to assess the contribution of point sources to the Galactic ridge X-ray emission.
  • We report on analysis of the poorly studied source 2RXP J130159.6-635806 at different epochs with ASCA, Beppo-SAX, XMM-Newton, and INTEGRAL. The source shows coherent X-ray pulsations at a period ~700s with an average spin up rate of about dnu/dt ~ 2x10^{-13} Hz/s. A broad band (1-60 keV) spectral analysis of 2RXP J130159.6-635806 based on almost simultaneous XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL data demonstrates that the source has a spectrum typical of an accretion powered X-ray pulsar, i.e. an absorbed power law with a high energy cut-off with a photon index Gamma ~ 0.5-1.0 and a cut-off energy of ~25 keV. The long term behaviour of the source, its spectral and timing properties, tend to indicate a high mass X-ray binary with Be companion. We also report on the identification of the likely infrared counterpart to 2RXP J130159.6-635806. The interstellar reddening does not allow us to strongly constrain the spectral type of the counterpart. The latter is, however, consistent with a Be star, the kind of which is often observed in accretion powered X-ray pulsars.
  • We compiled a sample of 95 AGNs serendipitously detected in the 3-20 keV band at Galactic latitude |b|>10 during the RXTE slew survey (XSS, Revnivtsev et al.), and utilize it to study the statistical properties of the local population of AGNs, including X-ray luminosity function and absorption distribution. We find that among low X-ray luminosity (Lx < 10^43.5 erg/s) AGNs, the ratio of absorbed (characterized by intrinsic absorption in the range 10^22 cm^-2 < NH < 10^24 cm^-2) and unabsorbed (NH < 10^22 cm^-2) objects is 2:1, while this ratio drops to less than 1:5 for higher luminosity AGNs. The summed X-ray output of AGNs with Lx > 10^41 erg/s estimated here is smaller than the earlier estimated total X-ray volume emissivity in the local Universe, suggesting that a comparable X-ray flux may be produced together by lower luminosity AGNs, non-active galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Finally, we present a sample of 35 AGN candidates, composed of the unidentified XSS sources.
  • Based on a deep survey of the Galactic Center region performed with the INTEGRAL observatory, we measured for the first time the hard X-ray (20-200 keV) spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy GRS 1734-292 located in the direction of the Galactic Center. We extended the spectrum to lower energies using archival GRANAT and ASCA observations. The broadband X-ray spectrum is similar to those of other nearby luminous AGNs, having a power law shape without cutoff up to at least 100 keV.
  • We present results of first simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of peculiar binary system SS433. For the first time, chaotic variability of SS433 in the optical spectral band (R band) on time scales as small as tens of seconds was detected. We find that the X-ray flux of SS433 is delayed with respect to the optical emission by approximately 80 sec. Such a delay can be interpreted as the travel time of mass accretion rate perturbations from the jet base to the observed X-ray emitting region. In this model, the length of the supercritical accretion disk funnel in SS433 is ~1e12 cm.