• Scattering of electrons by localized spins is the ultimate process enabling electrical detection and control of the magnetic state of a spin-doped material. At the molecular scale, this scattering is mediated by the electronic orbitals hosting the spin. Here we report the selective excitation of a molecular spin by electrons tunneling through different molecular orbitals. Spatially-resolved tunneling spectra on iron porphyrins on Au(111) reveal that the inelastic spin excitation extends beyond the iron site. The inelastic features also change shape and symmetry along the molecule. Combining DFT simulations with a phenomenological scattering model, we show that the extension and lineshape variations of the inelastic signal are due to excitation pathways assisted by different frontier orbitals, each of them with a different degree of hybridization with the surface. By selecting the intramolecular site for electron injection, the relative weight of iron and pyrrole orbitals in the tunneling process is modified. In this way, the spin excitation mechanism, reflected by its spectral lineshape, changes depending on the degree of localization and energy alignment of the chosen molecular orbital.
  • The realization of quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect in HgTe quantum wells (QWs) is considered a milestone in the discovery of topological insulators. The QSH edge states are predicted to allow current to flow at the edges of an insulating bulk, as demonstrated in various experiments. A key prediction of QSH theory that remains to be experimentally verified is the breakdown of the edge conduction under broken time reversal symmetry (TRS). Here we first establish a rigorous framework for understanding the magnetic field dependence of electrostatically gated QSH devices. We then report unexpected edge conduction under broken TRS, using a unique cryogenic microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), on a 7.5 nm HgTe QW device with an inverted band structure. At zero magnetic field and low carrier densities, clear edge conduction is observed in the local conductivity profile of this device but not in the 5.5 nm control device whose band structure is trivial. Surprisingly, the edge conduction in the 7.5 nm device persists up to 9 T with little effect from the magnetic field. This indicates physics beyond simple QSH models, possibly associated with material- specific properties, other symmetry protection and/or electron-electron interactions.
  • The properties of quantum systems interacting with their environment, commonly called open quantum systems, can be strongly affected by this interaction. While this can lead to unwanted consequences, such as causing decoherence in qubits used for quantum computation, it can also be exploited as a probe of the environment. For example, magnetic resonance imaging is based on the dependence of the spin relaxation times of protons in water molecules in a host's tissue. Here we show that the excitation energy of a single spin, which is determined by magnetocrystalline anisotropy and controls its stability and suitability for use in magnetic data storage devices, can be modified by varying the exchange coupling of the spin to a nearby conductive electrode. Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we observe variations up to a factor of two of the spin excitation energies of individual atoms as the strength of the spin's coupling to the surrounding electronic bath changes. These observations, combined with calculations, show that exchange coupling can strongly modify the magnetic anisotropy. This system is thus one of the few open quantum systems in which the energy levels, and not just the excited-state lifetimes, can be controllably renormalized. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the magnetocrystalline anisotropy, a property normally determined by the local structure around a spin, can be electronically tuned. These effects may play a significant role in the development of spintronic devices5 in which an individual magnetic atom or molecule is coupled to conducting leads.
  • Atomic contacts made of ferromagnetic metals present zero-bias anomalies in the differential conductance due to the Kondo effect. These systems provide a unique opportunity to perform a statistical analysis of the Kondo parameters in nanostructures since a large number of contacts can be easily fabricated using break-junction techniques. The details of the atomic structure differ from one contact to another so a large number of different configurations can be statistically analyzed. Here we present such a statistical analysis of the Kondo effect in atomic contacts made from the ferromagnetic transition metals Ni, Co and Fe. Our analysis shows clear differences between materials that can be understood by fundamental theoretical considerations. This combination of experiments and theory allow us to extract information about the origin and nature of the Kondo effect in these systems and to explore the influence of geometry and valence in the Kondo screening of atomic-sized nanostructures.