• Fast radio bursts are astronomical radio flashes of unknown physical nature with durations of milliseconds. Their dispersive arrival times suggest an extragalactic origin and imply radio luminosities orders of magnitude larger than any other kind of known short-duration radio transient. Thus far, all FRBs have been detected with large single-dish telescopes with arcminute localizations, and attempts to identify their counterparts (source or host galaxy) have relied on contemporaneous variability of field sources or the presence of peculiar field stars or galaxies. These attempts have not resulted in an unambiguous association with a host or multi-wavelength counterpart. Here we report the sub-arcsecond localization of FRB 121102, the only known repeating burst source, using high-time-resolution radio interferometric observations that directly image the bursts themselves. Our precise localization reveals that FRB 121102 originates within 100 mas of a faint 180 uJy persistent radio source with a continuum spectrum that is consistent with non-thermal emission, and a faint (25th magnitude) optical counterpart. The flux density of the persistent radio source varies by tens of percent on day timescales, and very long baseline radio interferometry yields an angular size less than 1.7 mas. Our observations are inconsistent with the fast radio burst having a Galactic origin or its source being located within a prominent star-forming galaxy. Instead, the source appears to be co-located with a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus or a previously unknown type of extragalactic source. [Truncated] If other fast radio bursts have similarly faint radio and optical counterparts, our findings imply that direct sub-arcsecond localizations of FRBs may be the only way to provide reliable associations.
  • We report the discovery and detailed monitoring of X-ray emission associated with the Type IIb SN 2011dh using data from the Swift and Chandra satellites, placing it among the best studied X-ray supernovae to date. We further present millimeter and radio data obtained with the SMA, CARMA, and EVLA during the first three weeks after explosion. Combining these observations with early optical photometry, we show that the panchromatic dataset is well-described by non-thermal synchrotron emission (radio/mm) with inverse Compton scattering (X-ray) of a thermal population of optical photons. In this scenario, the shock partition fractions deviate from equipartition by a factor, (e_e/e_B) ~ 30. We derive the properties of the shockwave and the circumstellar environment and find a shock velocity, v~0.1c, and a progenitor mass loss rate of ~6e-5 M_sun/yr. These properties are consistent with the sub-class of Type IIb SNe characterized by compact progenitors (Type cIIb) and dissimilar from those with extended progenitors (Type eIIb). Furthermore, we consider the early optical emission in the context of a cooling envelope model to estimate a progenitor radius of ~1e+11 cm, in line with the expectations for a Type cIIb SN. Together, these diagnostics are difficult to reconcile with the extended radius of the putative yellow supergiant progenitor star identified in archival HST observations, unless the stellar density profile is unusual. Finally, we searched for the high energy shock breakout pulse using X-ray and gamma-ray observations obtained during the purported explosion date range. Based on the compact radius of the progenitor, we estimate that the breakout pulse was detectable with current instruments but likely missed due to their limited temporal/spatial coverage. [Abridged]
  • We report on Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) observations of the Type IIb supernova 2011dh, performed over the first 100 days of its evolution and spanning 1-40 GHz in frequency. The radio emission is well-described by the self-similar propagation of a spherical shockwave, generated as the supernova ejecta interact with the local circumstellar environment. Modeling this emission with a standard synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) model gives an average expansion velocity of v \approx 0.1c, supporting the classification of the progenitor as a compact star (R_* \approx 10^11 cm). We find that the circumstellar density is consistent with a {\rho} \propto r^-2 profile. We determine that the progenitor shed mass at a constant rate of \approx 3 \times 10^-5 M_\odot / yr, assuming a wind velocity of 1000 km / s (values appropriate for a Wolf-Rayet star), or \approx 7 \times 10^-7 M_\odot / yr assuming 20 km / s (appropriate for a yellow supergiant [YSG] star). Both values of the mass-loss rate assume a converted fraction of kinetic to magnetic energy density of {\epsilon}_B = 0.1. Although optical imaging shows the presence of a YSG, the rapid optical evolution and fast expansion argue that the progenitor is a more compact star - perhaps a companion to the YSG. Furthermore, the excellent agreement of the radio properties of SN 2011dh with the SSA model implies that any YSG companion is likely in a wide, non-interacting orbit.
  • The Galactic Black hole candidate XTE J1752-223 was observed during the decay of its 2009 outburst with the Suzaku and XMM-Newton observatories. The observed spectra are consistent with the source being in the ''intermediate`` and ''low-hard state`` respectively. The presence of a strong, relativistic iron emission line is clearly detected in both observations and the line profiles are found to be remarkably consistent and robust to a variety of continuum models. This strongly points to the compact object in \j\ being a stellar-mass black hole accretor and not a neutron star. Physically-motivated and self-consistent reflection models for the Fe-\ka\ emission-line profile and disk reflection spectrum rule out either a non-rotating, Schwarzchild black hole or a maximally rotating, Kerr black hole at greater than 3sigma level of confidence. Using a fully relativistic line function in which the black hole spin parameter is a variable, we have formally constrained the spin parameter to be $0.52\pm0.11 (1\sigma)$. Furthermore, we show that the source in the low--hard state still requires an optically--thick disk component having a luminosity which is consistent with the $L\propto T^4$ relation expected for a thin disk extending down to the inner--most stable circular orbit. Our result is in contrast to the prevailing paradigm that the disk is truncated in the low-hard state.
  • In this Paper we report on radio (VLA and ATCA) and X-ray (RXTE, Chandra and Swift) observations of the outburst decay of the transient black hole candidate H1743-322 in early 2008. We find that the X-ray light curve followed an exponential decay, leveling off towards its quiescent level. The exponential decay timescale is ~4 days and the quiescent flux corresponds to a luminosity of 3x10^32 (d/7.5 kpc)^2 erg/s. This together with the relation between quiescent X-ray luminosity and orbital period reported in the literature suggests that H1743-322 has an orbital period longer than ~10 hours. Both the radio and X-ray light curve show evidence for flares. The radio - X-ray correlation can be well described by a power-law with index ~0.18. This is much lower than the index of 0.6-0.7 found for the decay of several black hole transients before. The radio spectral index measured during one of the radio flares while the source is in the low-hard state, is -0.5+-0.15, which indicates that the radio emission is optically thin. This is unlike what has been found before in black hole sources in the low-hard state. We attribute the radio flares and the low index for the radio - X-ray correlation to the presence of shocks downstream the jet flow, triggered by ejection events earlier in the outburst. We find no evidence for a change in X-ray power law spectral index during the decay, although the relatively high extinction of N_H =2.3x10^22 cm^-2 limits the detected number of soft photons and thus the accuracy of the spectral fits.
  • The black-hole X-ray binary transient GRO J1655-40 underwent an outburst beginning in early 2005. We present the results of our multi-wavelength observational campaign to study the early outburst spectral and temporal evolution, which combines data from X-ray (RXTE, INTEGRAL), radio (VLA) and optical (ROTSE, SMARTS) instruments. During the reported period the source left quiescence and went through four major accreting black hole states: low-hard, hard intermediate, soft intermediate and high-soft. We investigated dipping behavior in the RXTE band and compare our results to the 1996-1997 case, when the source was predominantly in the high-soft state, finding significant differences. We consider the evolution of the low frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and find that the frequency strongly correlates with the spectral characteristics, before shutting off prior to the transition to the high-soft state. We model the broad-band high-energy spectrum in the context of empirical models, as well as more physically motivated thermal and bulk-motion Comptonization and Compton reflection models. RXTE and INTEGRAL data together support a statistically significant high energy cut-off in the energy spectrum at 100~200 keV during the low-hard state. The RXTE data alone also show it very significantly during the transition, but cannot see one in the high-soft state spectra. We consider radio, optical and X-ray connections in the context of possible synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton origins of X-ray emission in low-hard and intermediate states. In this outburst of GRO J1655-40, the radio flux does not rise strongly with the X-ray flux.
  • We present the first results of our X-ray monitoring campaign on a 1.7 square degree region centered on Sgr A* using the satellites XMM-Newton and Chandra. The purpose of this campaign is to monitor the behavior (below 10 keV) of X-ray sources (both persistent and transient) which are too faint to be detected by monitoring instruments aboard other satellites currently in orbit (e.g., Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer; INTEGRAL). Our first monitoring observations (using the HRC-I aboard Chandra) were obtained on June 5, 2005. Most of the sources detected could be identified with foreground sources, such as X-ray active stars. In addition we detected two persistent X-ray binaries (1E 1743.1-2843; 1A 1742-294), two faint X-ray transients (GRS 1741.9-2853; XMM J174457-2850.3), as well as a possible new transient source at a luminosity of a few times 1E34 erg/s. We report on the X-ray results on these systems and on the non-detection of the transients in follow-up radio data using the Very Large Array. We discuss how our monitoring campaign can help to improve our understanding of the different types of X-ray transients (i.e., the very faint ones).
  • We present radio observations of the black hole X-ray transient XTE J1720-318, which was discovered in 2003 January as it entered an outburst. We analyse the radio data in the context of the X-ray outburst and the broad-band spectrum. An unresolved radio source was detected during the rising phase, reaching a peak of nearly 5 mJy approximately coincident with the peak of the X-ray lightcurve. Study of the spectral indices suggests that at least two ejection events took place, the radio-emitting material expanding and becoming optically thin as it faded. The broad-band spectra suggested that the accretion disc dominated the emission, as expected for a source in the high/soft state. The radio emission decayed to below the sensitivity of the telescopes for ~6 weeks but switched on again during the transition of the X-ray source to the low/hard state. At least one ``glitch'' was superimposed on the otherwise exponential decay of the X-ray lightcurve, which was reminiscent of the multiple jet ejections of XTE J1859+226. We also present a K_s-band image of XTE J1720-318 and its surrounding field taken with the VLT.
  • We report simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of V404 Cyg in quiescence. The X-ray flux varied dramatically by a factor of >20 during a 60ks observation. X-ray variations were well correlated with those in Halpha, although the latter include an approximately constant component as well. Correlations can also be seen with the optical continuum, although these are less clear. We see no large lag between X-ray and optical line variations; this implies they are causally connected on short timescales. As in previous observations, Halpha flares exhibit a double-peaked profile suggesting emission distributed across the accretion disk. The peak separation is consistent with material extending outwards to at least the circularization radius. The prompt response in the entire Halpha line confirms that the variability is powered by X-ray (and/or EUV) irradiation.
  • Obtaining simultaneous radio and X-ray data during the outburst decay of soft X-ray transients is a potentially important tool to study the disc - jet connection. Here we report results of the analysis of (nearly) simultaneous radio (VLA or WSRT) and Chandra X-ray observations of XTE J1908+094 during the last part of the decay of the source after an outburst. The limit on the index of a radio - X-ray correlation we find is consistent with the value of 0.7 which was found for other black hole candidates in the low/hard state. Interestingly, the limit we find seems more consistent with a value of 1.4 which was recently shown to be typical for radiatively efficient accretion flow models. We further show that when the correlation-index is the same for two sources one can use the differences in normalisation in the radio - X-ray flux correlation to estimate the distance towards the sources if the distance of one of them is accurately known (assuming black hole spin and mass and jet Lorentz factor differences are unimportant or minimal). Finally, we observed a strong increase in the rate of decay of the X-ray flux. Between March 23, 2003 and April 19, 2003 the X-ray flux decayed with a factor ~5 whereas between April 19, 2003 and May 13, 2003, the X-ray flux decreased by a factor ~750. The source (0.5-10 keV) luminosity at the last Chandra observation was L~3x10^32 (d/8.5 kpc)^2 erg s^-1.
  • We present the analysis of simultaneous X-ray (RXTE) and radio (VLA) observations of two atoll-type neutron star X-ray binaries: 4U 1820-30 and Ser X-1. Both sources were steadily in the soft (banana) X-ray state during the observations. We have detected the radio counterpart of 4U 1820-30 at 4.86 GHz and 8.46 GHz at a flux density of ~0.1 mJy. This radio source is positionally coincident with the radio pulsar PSR 1820-30A. However, the pulsar's radio emission falls rapidly with frequency (proportional to \nu^(-3)) and we argue that the X-ray binary's radio emission is dominant above ~2 GHz. Supporting this interpretation, comparison with previous observations reveals variability at the higher radio frequencies that is likely to be due to the X-ray binary. We have detected for the first time the radio counterpart of Ser X-1 at 8.46 GHz, also at a flux density of ~0.1 mJy. The position of the radio counterpart has allowed us to unambiguously identify its optical counterpart. We briefly discuss similarities and differences between the disc-jet coupling in neutron star and black hole X-ray binaries. In particular, we draw attention to the fact that, contrary to other states, neutron star X-ray binaries seem to be more radio loud than persistent black hole candidates when the emission is 'quenched' in the soft state.
  • We present new high resolution and high sensitivity multi-frequency VLA radio continuum observations of the G9.62+0.19-F hot molecular core. We detect for the first time faint centimetric radio continuum emission at the position of the core. The centimetric continuum spectrum of the source is consistent with thermal emission from ionised gas. This is the first direct evidence that a newly born massive star is powering the G9.62+0.19-F hot core.
  • Cyg X-3 is an unusual X-ray binary which shows remarkable correlative behavior between the hard X-ray, soft X-ray, and the radio. We present an analysis of these long term light curves in the context of spectral changes of the system. This analysis will also incorporate a set of pointed RXTE observations made during a period when Cyg X-3 made a transition from a quiescent radio state to a flaring state (including a major flare) and then returned to a quiescent radio state.
  • In the period between May 1997 and August 1997 a series of pointed RXTE observations were made of Cyg X-3. During this period Cyg X-3 made a transition from a quiescent radio state to a flare state (including a major flare) and then returned to a quiescent radio state. Analyses of the observations are made in the context of concurrent observations in the hard X-ray (CGRO/BATSE), soft X-ray (RXTE/ASM) and the radio (Green Bank Interferometer, Ryle Telescope, and RATAN-600). Preliminary analyses of the observations are presented.