• We present optical continuum lags for two Seyfert 1 galaxies, MCG+08-11-011 and NGC 2617, using monitoring data from a reverberation mapping campaign carried out in 2014. Our light curves span the ugriz filters over four months, with median cadences of 1.0 and 0.6 days for MCG+08-11-011 and NGC\,2617, respectively, combined with roughly daily X-ray and near-UV data from Swift for NGC 2617. We find lags consistent with geometrically thin accretion-disk models that predict a lag-wavelength relation of $\tau \propto \lambda^{4/3}$. However, the observed lags are larger than predictions based on standard thin-disk theory by factors of 3.3 for MCG+08-11-011 and 2.3 for NGC\,2617. These differences can be explained if the mass accretion rates are larger than inferred from the optical luminosity by a factor of 4.3 in MCG+08-11-011 and a factor of 1.3 in NGC\,2617, although uncertainty in the SMBH masses determines the significance of this result. While the X-ray variability in NGC\,2617 precedes the UV/optical variability, the long 2.6 day lag is problematic for coronal reprocessing models.
  • We present the results of a multi-wavelength study of a sample of high-redshift Radio Loud (RL) Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasars. This way we extend to higher redshift previous studies on the radio properties, and broadband optical colors of these objects. We have se- lected a sample of 22 RL BAL quasars with 3.6 z 4.8 cross-correlating the FIRST radio survey with the SDSS. Flux densities between 1.25 and 9.5 GHz have been collected with the JVLA and Effelsberg-100m telescopes for 15 BAL and 14 non-BAL quasars used as compar- ison sample. We determine the synchrotron peak frequency, constraining their age. A large number of GigaHertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and High Frequency Peakers (HFP) sources has been found in both samples (80% for BAL and 71% for non-BAL QSOs), not suggesting a younger age for BAL quasars. The spectral index distribution provides information about the orientation of these sources, and we find statistically similar distributions for the BAL and non-BAL quasars in contrast to work done on lower redshift samples. Our sample may be too small to convincingly find the same effect, or might represent a real evolutionary effect based on the large fraction of young sources. We also study the properties of broadband colors in both optical (SDSS) and near- and mid-infrared (UKIDSS and WISE) bands, finding that also at high redshift BAL quasars tend to be optically redder than non-BAL quasars. However, these differences are no more evident at longer wavelength, when comparing colors of the two samples by mean of the WISE survey.
  • We present the first results from an optical reverberation mapping campaign executed in 2014, targeting the active galactic nuclei (AGN) MCG+08-11-011, NGC 2617, NGC 4051, 3C 382, and Mrk 374. Our targets have diverse and interesting observational properties, including a "changing look" AGN and a broad-line radio galaxy. Based on continuum-H$\beta$ lags, we measure black hole masses for all five targets. We also obtain H$\gamma$ and He{\sc ii}\,$\lambda 4686$ lags for all objects except 3C 382. The He{\sc ii}\,$\lambda 4686$ lags indicate radial stratification of the BLR, and the masses derived from different emission lines are in general agreement. The relative responsivities of these lines are also in qualitative agreement with photoionization models. These spectra have extremely high signal-to-noise ratios (100--300 per pixel) and there are excellent prospects for obtaining velocity-resolved reverberation signatures.
  • With a quasar sample designed for studying orientation effects, we investigate the orientation dependence of characteristics of the C IV 1549 broad emission line in approximately 50 Type 1 quasars with z=0.1-1.4. Orientation is measured for the sample via radio core dominance. In our analysis we include measurements of the continuum luminosity and the optical-to-X-ray spectral slope, spectral properties commonly included in the suite known as "Eigenvector 1", and the full-width at half maximum, full-width at one-quarter-maximum, shape, blueshift, and equivalent width of the C IV broad emission line. We also investigate a new prescription that we recently developed for predicting the velocity line width of the H-beta broad emission line based on the velocity line width of the C IV line and the ratio of continuum subtracted peak fluxes of Si IV + O IV] at 1400 A to C IV. In addition to a correlation analysis of the ultraviolet spectral properties and radio core dominance, we provide composite spectra of edge-on and face-on sources for this sample. In particular, we highlight the orientation dependence of the velocity line width predicted for H-beta. We find that this predicted line width depends on orientation in a manner similar to the true velocity line width of H-beta, where no such dependence is observed for C IV. This is an indication that orientation information concerning the line emitting regions can be extracted from ultraviolet spectra. [abridged]
  • Currently, the ability to produce black hole mass estimates using the CIV 1549 line that are consistent with Hb mass estimates is uncertain, due in large part to disagreement between velocity line width measurements for the two lines. This discrepancy between Hb and CIV arises from the fact that both line profiles are treated the same way in single-epoch scaling relationships based on the assumption that the broad-line region is virialized, even though a non-virialized emission component is often significant in the CIV line and absent or weak in the Hb line. Using quasi-simultaneous optical and ultra-violet spectra for a sample of 85 optically bright quasars with redshifts in the range z=0.03-1.4, we present a significant step along the path to rehabilitating the CIV line for black hole mass estimates. We show that the residuals of velocity line width between CIV and Hb are significantly correlated with the peak flux ratio of SiIV+OIV] 1400 to CIV. Using this relationship, we develop a prescription for estimating black hole masses from the ultra-violet spectrum that agree better with Hb-based masses than the traditional CIV masses. The scatter between Hb and CIV masses is initially 0.43 dex in our sample and is reduced to 0.33 dex when using our prescription. The peak flux ratio of SiIV+OIV] 1400 to CIV is an ultraviolet indicator of the suite of spectral properties commonly known as "Eigenvector 1", thus the reduction in scatter between CIV and Hb black hole masses is essentially due to removing an Eigenvector 1 bias in CIV-based masses.
  • We have obtained IRTF/SpeX spectra of eight moderate-redshift (z=0.7-2.4), radio-selected (log R*~0.4-1.9) broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. The spectra cover the rest-frame optical band. We compare the optical properties of these quasars to those of canonically radio-quiet (log R*<1) BAL quasars at similar redshifts and to low-redshift quasars from the Palomar-Green catalog. As with previous studies of BAL quasars, we find that [OIII] 5007 is weak, and optical FeII emission is strong, a rare combination in canonically radio-loud (log R*>1) quasars. With our measurements of the optical properties, particularly the Balmer emission line widths and the continuum luminosity, we have used empirical scaling relations to estimate black hole masses and Eddington ratios. These lie in the range (0.4-2.6)x10^9 M_sun and 0.1-0.9, respectively. Despite their comparatively extreme radio properties relative to most BAL quasars, their optical properties are quite consistent with those of radio-quiet BAL quasars and dissimilar to those of radio-loud non-BAL quasars. While BAL quasars generally appear to have low values of [OIII]/FeII, an extreme of "Eigenvector 1", the Balmer line widths and Eddington ratios do not appear to significantly differ from those of unabsorbed quasars at similar redshifts and luminosities.
  • We study the kinematics and excitation mechanisms of H2 and [Fe II] lines in a sample of 67 emission-line galaxies with Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX near-infrared (NIR, 0.8-2.4 micrometers) spectroscopy together with new photoionisation models. H2 emission lines are systematically narrower than narrow-line region (NLR) lines, suggesting that the two are, very likely, kinematically disconnected. The new models and emission-line ratios show that the thermal excitation plays an important role not only in active galactic nuclei but also in star forming galaxies. The importance of the thermal excitation in star forming galaxies may be associated with the presence of supernova remnants close to the region emitting H2 lines. This hypothesis is further supported by the similarity between the vibrational and rotational temperatures of H2. We confirm that the diagram involving the line ratios H2 2.121/Br_gamma and [Fe II] 1.257/Pa_beta is an efficient tool for separating emission-line objects according to their dominant type of activity. We suggest new limits to the line ratios in order to discriminate between the different types of nuclear activity.
  • We recently presented radio observations of a large sample of radio-loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasars from the SDSS and FIRST surveys, as well as a well matched sample of unabsorbed quasars, primarily to measure their radio spectral indices and estimate ensemble orientations. Here, we analyze the SDSS spectra of these samples and compare the rest-frame ultraviolet properties of radio-loud BAL and non-BAL quasars. Ultraviolet properties include the continuum shape, emission-line measurements of C IV, Al III, C III], Fe II, and Mg II, and BAL properties including the balnicity index (BI), absorption index (AI), and minimum and maximum outflow velocities. We find that radio-loud BAL quasars have similar ultraviolet properties compared to radio-loud non-BAL sources, though they do appear to have redder continua and stronger Fe II emission, which is consistent with what is found for radio-quiet BAL sources. No correlations exist between outflow properties and orientation (radio spectral index), suggesting that BAL winds along any line of sight are driven by the same mechanisms. There are also few correlations between spectral index and other properties. We conclude that BAL outflows occur along all lines of sight with similar strengths and velocities.
  • We present images of 29 post-starburst quasars (PSQs) from a Hubble Space Telescope (\emph{HST}) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel Snapshot program. These broad-lined active galactic nuclei (AGN) possess the spectral signatures of massive ($M_{burst} \sim 10^{10} M_{\odot}$), moderate-aged stellar populations (hundreds of Myrs). Thus, their composite nature provides insight into the AGN-starburst connection. We measure quasar-to-host galaxy light contributions via semi-automated two-dimensional light profile fits of PSF-subtracted images. We examine the host morphologies, as well as, model the separate bulge and disk components. The \emph{HST}/ACS-F606W images reveal an equal number of spiral (13/29) and early-type (13/29) hosts, with the remaining three hosts having indeterminate classifications. AGNs hosted by early-type galaxies have on average greater luminosity than those hosted by spiral galaxies. Disturbances, such as tidal tails, shells, star-forming knots, and asymmetries are seen as signposts of interaction/merger activity. Disturbances such as these were found in 17 of the 29 objects and are evenly distributed among early-type and spiral galaxies. Two of these systems are clearly merging with their companions. Compared to other AGN of similar luminosity and redshift these PSQs have a higher fraction of early-type hosts and disturbances. Our most luminous objects with disturbed early-type host galaxies appear to be consistent with merger products. Thus, these luminous disturbed galaxies may represent a phase in an evolutionary scenario for merger driven activity and of hierarchical galaxy evolution. Our less luminous objects appear to be consistent with Seyfert galaxies not requiring triggering by major mergers. Many of these Seyferts are barred spiral galaxies.
  • We use photometric data from Spitzer to explore the mid- and far-IR properties of 10 red QSOs (J-K>2, R-K>5) selected by combining the 2MASS in the NIR with the SDSS at optical wavelengths. Optical and/or near-infrared spectra are available for 8/10 sources. Modeling the SED from UV to far-IR shows that moderate dust reddening (A_V=1.3-3.2) can explain the red optical and near-IR colours of the sources in the sample. There is also evidence that red QSOs have 60/12micron luminosity ratio higher than PG QSOs (97% significance). This can be interpreted as a higher level of star-formation in these systems (measured by the 60micron luminosity) for a given AGN power (approximated by the 12micron luminosity). This is consistent with a picture where red QSOs represent an early phase of AGN evolution, when the supermassive black hole is enshrouded in dust and gas clouds, which will eventually be blown out (possibly by AGN driven outflows) and the system will appear as typical optically luminous QSO. There is also tentative evidence significant at the 96% level that red 2MASS QSOs are more often associated with radio emission than optically selected SDSS QSOs. This may indicate outflows, also consistent with the young AGN interpretation. We also estimate the space density of red QSOs relative to optically selected SDSS QSOs, taking into account the effect of dust extinction and the intrinsic luminosity of the sources. We estimate that the fraction of red QSOs in the overall population increases from 3% at M_K=-27.5mag to 12% at M_K=-29.5mag. This suggests that reddened QSOs become more important at the bright end of the Luminosity Function. If red QSOs are transition objects on the way to becoming typical optically luminous QSOs, the low fractions above suggest that these systems spent <12% of their lifetime at the "reddened" stage.
  • We present far-ultraviolet spectra of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 5548 obtained in 2000 June with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Our data span the observed wavelength range 915--1185 Angstroms at a resolution of 20 km/s. The spectrum shows a weak continuum and emission from O VI, C III, and He II. The FUSE data were obtained when the AGN was in a low state, which has revealed strong, narrow O VI emission lines. We also resolve intrinsic, associated absorption lines of O VI and the Lyman series. Several distinct kinematic components are present, spanning a velocity range of 0 to -1300 km/s relative to systemic, with kinematic structure similar to that seen in previous observations of longer wavelength ultraviolet (UV) lines. We explore the relationship between the far-UV absorbers and those seen previously in the UV and X-rays. We find that the high-velocity UV absorption component is consistent with being low-ionization, contrary to some previous claims, and is consistent with its non-detection in high-resolution X-ray spectra. The intermediate velocity absorbers, at -300 to -400 km/s, show H I and O VI column densities consistent with having contributions from both a high-ionization X-ray absorber and a low-ionization UV absorber. No single far-UV absorbing component can be solely identified with the X-ray absorber.
  • We present a very high signal-to-noise ratio composite spectrum created using 657 radio-selected quasars from the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey. The spectrum spans rest-frame wavelengths 900 - 7500 Angstroms. Additionally we present composite spectra formed from subsets of the total data set in order to investigate the spectral dependence on radio loudness and the presence of broad absorption. In particular, radio-loud quasars are red compared to radio-quiet quasars, and quasars showing low-ionization broad absorption lines are red compared to other quasars. We compare our composites with those from the Large Bright Quasar Survey. Composite quasar spectra have proven to be valuable tools for a host of applications, and in that spirit we make these publically available via the FIRST survey web page.
  • We report the discovery of a bright quasar (E=15.8, z=0.868) associated with the flat spectrum radio source NVSS J235953-124148. This quasar we designate QSO 2359-1241 possesses a rare combination of extreme properties that make it of special interest. These properties include: intrinsic high-velocity outflow seen in absorption for both high and low-ionization species, high optical polarization (about 5%), significant radio emission, and dust reddening. The dereddened absolute magnitude of QSO 2359-1241 places it among the three most optically luminous quasars known at z<1. High-resolution spectroscopy and a detailed analysis of the optical/ultraviolet absorption features will be given in a companion paper (Arav et al 2000).
  • We have used the VLA FIRST survey and the APM catalog of the POSS-I plates as the basis for constructing a new radio-selected sample of optically bright quasars. This is the first radio-selected sample that is competitive in size with current optically selected quasar surveys. Using only two basic criteria, radio-optical positional coincidence and optical morphology, quasars and BL Lacs can be identified with 60% selection efficiency; the efficiency increases to 70% for objects fainter than magnitude 17. We show that a more sophisticated selection scheme can predict with better than 85% reliability which candidates will turn out to be quasars. This paper presents the second installment of the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey with a catalog of 636 quasars distributed over 2682 square degrees. The quasar sample is characterized and all spectra are displayed. The FBQS detects both radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars out to a redshift z>3. We find a large population of objects of intermediate radio-loudness; there is no evidence in our sample for a bimodal distribution of radio characteristics. The sample includes ~29 broad absorption line quasars, both high and low ionization, and a number of new objects with remarkable optical spectra.
  • We report the discovery of a spectacular ``post-starburst quasar'' UN J1025-0040 (B=19; z=0.634). The optical spectrum is a chimera, displaying the broad Mg II emission line and strong blue continuum characteristic of quasars, but is dominated in the red by a large Balmer jump and prominent high-order Balmer absorption lines indicative of a substantial young stellar population at similar redshift. Stellar synthesis population models show that the stellar component is consistent with a 400 Myr old instantaneous starburst with a mass of less than or about 10^{11} solar masses. A deep, K_s-band image taken in 0.5 arcsec seeing shows a point source surrounded by asymmetric extended fuzz. Approximately 70% of the light is unresolved, the majority of which is expected to be emitted by the starburst. While starbursts and galaxy interactions have been previously associated with quasars, no quasar ever before has been seen with such an extremely luminous young stellar population.
  • We report the discovery of a small separation quasar pair (z=0.586, O=18.4, 19.2, sep. = 2.3 arcsec) associated with the radio source FIRST J164311.3+315618 (S_1400 = 120 mJy). The spectrum of the brighter quasar (A) has a much stronger narrow emission-line spectrum than the other (B), and also stronger Balmer lines relative to the continuum. The continuum ratio of the spectra is flat in the blue at about 2.1, but falls to 1.5 at longer wavelengths. A K' image shows two unresolved sources with a flux ratio of 1.3. The different colors appear to result from the contribution of the host galaxy of B, which is evident from Ca II and high-order Balmer absorption lines indicative of a substantial young stellar population. New 3.6 cm VLA observations show that the compact radio source is coincident with quasar A (B is only marginally detected). We rule out the lensing hypothesis because the optical flux ratio is A/B = 1.2 to 2, while the radio flux ratio is A/B > 40, and conclude that this system is a binary. Moreover, the radio-loud quasar is a compact steep spectrum source. FIRST J164311.3+315618A, B is the lowest redshift and smallest separation binary quasar yet identified.
  • We have carried out a spectropolarimetric search for hidden broad-line quasars in three ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) discovered in the positional correlations between sources detected in deep radio surveys and the IRAS Faint Source Catalog. Only the high-ionization Seyfert 2 galaxy TF J1736+1122 is highly polarized, displaying a broad-line spectrum visible in polarized light. The other two objects, TF J1020+6436 and FF J1614+3234, display spectra dominated by a population of young (A-type) stars similar to those of ``E + A'' galaxies. They are unpolarized, showing no sign of hidden broad-line regions. The presence of young starburst components in all three galaxies indicates that the ULIRG phenomenon encompasses both AGN and starburst activity, but the most energetic ULIRGs do not necessarily harbor ``buried quasars''. We find that a luminous infrared galaxy is most likely to host an obscured quasar if it exhibits a high-ionization ([O III] 5007/Hb >~ 5) spectrum typical of a ``classic'' Seyfert 2 galaxy with little or no Balmer absorption lines, is ``ultraluminous'' (L_IR >~ 10^12 L_sun), and has a ``warm'' IR color (f_25/f_60 >~ 0.25). The detection of hidden quasars in this group but not in the low-ionization, starburst-dominated ULIRGs (classified as LINERs or H II galaxies) may indicate an evolutionary connection, with the latter being found in younger systems.
  • Many ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) are powered by quasars hidden in the center, but many are also powered by starbursts. A simply diagnostic diagram is proposed that can identify obscured quasars in ULIRGs by their high-ionization emission lines ([O III] 5007/Hbeta >~ 5), and ``warm'' IR color (f_{25}/f_{60} >~ 0.25).
  • Statistical investigations of samples of quasars have established that clusters of properties are correlated. The strongest trends among the ultraviolet emission-line properties are characterized by the object-to-object variation of emission from low-velocity gas, the so-called ``intermediate-line region'' or ILR. The strongest trends among the optical emission-line properties are characterized by the object-to-object variation of the line intensity ratio of [O III] 5007 to optical Fe II. Additionally, the strength of ILR emission correlates with [O III]/Fe II, as well as with radio and X-ray properties. The fundamental physical parameter driving these related correlations is not yet identified. Because the variation in the ILR dominates the variation in the equivalent widths of lines showing the Baldwin effect, it is important to understand whether the physical parameter underlying this variation also drives the Baldwin effect or is a primary source of scatter in the Baldwin effect.
  • A unique, essentially complete sample of 22 QSOs, with high quality soft X-ray spectra from ROSAT, as well as HST and optical spectrophotometry from below Ly-alpha to above H-alpha, is being used to investigate the relationships among the ionizing continuum and the optical and UV continuum, emission and absorption lines. Here we present a first analysis showing that optical `Eigenvector 1' linking steeper soft X-ray spectra with increasing optical Fe II strength, decreasing [O III] 5007 emission, and narrower BLR H-beta emission, extends to the UV emission lines, and is manifested by weaker C IV 1549 emission, stronger Si III] 1892/C III] 1909 ratio, and narrower C III] 1909 emission. Steeper soft X-ray spectra have been linked to higher L/L_Edd ratios, thus apparently linking BLR densities, high and low ionization gas, and kinematics, to the accretion process.
  • We report the discovery of five broad-absorption-line (BAL) QSOs in a complete sample of 111 ultraviolet excess (UVX) QSO candidates also detected in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. All five BAL QSOs, which include two high-ionization BAL QSOs and three low-ionization BAL QSOs, are formally radio-loud. Of QSOs with z > 0.4, 3+/-2% show low-ionization BALs, and of QSOs with z > 1.5, all radio-loud, 9+/-5% show BALs; these frequencies are consistent with those of optical surveys. While the first reported radio-loud BAL QSO, FIRST J155633.8+351758, is likely to be heavily dust reddened and thus less radio-loud than indicated by its observed radio-to-optical luminosity, these QSOs are UVX selected and probably free of significant dust along the line of sight. We point out unusual features in two of the BAL QSOs and discuss the significance finding these heretofore rare objects.
  • We present Keck spectropolarimetry of the highly polarized radio-loud quasar 3CR 68.1 (z=1.228, V=19). The polarization increases from 5 in the red (4000 A rest-frame) to >10% in the blue (1900 A rest-frame). The broad emission lines are polarized the same as the continuum, which shows that 3CR 68.1 is not a blazar as it has sometimes been regarded in the past. We also present measurements of the emission lines and a strong, blueshifted, associated absorption line system, as well as a detection at the emission-line redshift of Ca II K absorption, presumably from stars in the host galaxy. 3CR 68.1 belongs to an observationally rare class of highly polarized quasars that are neither blazars nor partially obscured radio-quiet QSOs. Taking into account 3CR 68.1's other unusual properties, such as its extremely red spectral energy distribution and its extreme lobe dominance, we explain our spectropolarimetric results in terms of unified models. We argue that we have a dusty, highly inclined view of 3CR 68.1, with reddened scattered (polarized) quasar light diluted by even more dust-reddened quasar light reaching us directly from the nucleus.
  • We present Keck spectropolarimetry of two rare low-ionization broad absorption line (BAL) QSOs, FIRST J084044.5+363328 and FIRST J155633.8+351758, that also exhibit narrow absorption lines from metastable excited levels of Fe II (``Iron Lo-BALs''). These QSOs were discovered in optical follow-ups to a deep radio survey; FIRST J155633.8+351758 is radio-loud, the first BAL QSO so identified. FIRST J084044.5+363328 is highly polarized and exhibits many features found in other BAL QSOs, and the polarization and its position angle vary in a complicated manner across the metastable Fe II absorption lines, suggesting that more than one mechanism is at work, or that the system geometry is complex. FIRST J155633.8+351758 may be the most highly polarized BAL QSO known, and exhibits other unusual polarization properties compared to other highly polarized BAL QSOs. Currently available data cannot yet discriminate among the possible lines of sight to BAL QSOs (edge-on, pole-on, or random).
  • We present Keck spectropolarimetry of a rare ``Iron Lo-BALQSO,'' FIRST 0840+3633. The continuum is 4% polarized near 2000 angstroms rest-frame, but falls to 2% at longer wavelengths, and maintains a relatively constant position angle of 50 degrees. The emission lines are unpolarized. The polarization increases up to 8% in the low-ionization absorption troughs of Mg II 2800 and Al III 1860. The polarization and its position angle vary in a complicated manner across the metastable Fe II absorption lines, suggesting that more than one mechanism is at work or that the system geometry is complex.
  • QSOs' emission lines arise from highest velocity (approximately 10000 km/s), dense gas within approximately 0.1 parsec of the central engine, out to low-velocity, low-density gas at great distances from the host galaxy. In radio-loud QSOs there are clear indications that the distribution and kinematics of emission-line gas are related to the symmetry axis of the central engine, as defined by the radio jet. These jets originate at nuclear distances < 0.1 pc --- similar to the highest-velocity emission line gas. There are two ways we can investigate the different environments of radio-loud and radio-quiet QSOs, i.e., those with and without powerful radio jets. One is to look for optical-UV spectroscopic differences between radio-loud and radio-quiet QSOs. The other is to investigate dependences of spectroscopic properties on properties of the powerful jets in radio-loud QSOs. Here we summarize the spectroscopic differences between the two classes, and present known dependences of spectra on radio core-dominance, which we interpret as dependences on the angle of the central engine to the line-of-sight. We speculate on what some of the differences may mean.