• We explore how the group environment may affect the evolution of star-forming galaxies. We select 1197 Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) groups at $0.05\leq z \leq 0.2$ and analyze the projected phase space (PPS) diagram, i.e. the galaxy velocity as a function of projected group-centric radius, as a local environmental metric in the low-mass halo regime $10^{12}\leq (M_{200}/M_{\odot})< 10^{14}$. We study the properties of star-forming group galaxies, exploring the correlation of star formation rate (SFR) with radial distance and stellar mass. We find that the fraction of star-forming group members is higher in the PPS regions dominated by recently accreted galaxies, whereas passive galaxies dominate the virialized regions. We observe a small decline in specific SFR of star-forming galaxies towards the group center by a factor $\sim 1.2$ with respect to field galaxies. Similar to cluster studies, we conclude for low-mass halos that star-forming group galaxies represent an infalling population from the field to the halo and show suppressed star formation.
  • One key problem in astrophysics is understanding how and why galaxies switch off their star formation, building the quiescent population that we observe in the local Universe. From the GAMA and VIPERS surveys, we use spectroscopic indices to select quiescent and candidate transition galaxies. We identify potentially rapidly transitioning post-starburst galaxies, and slower transitioning green-valley galaxies. Over the last 8 Gyrs the quiescent population has grown more slowly in number density at high masses (M$_*>10^{11}$M$_\odot$) than at intermediate masses (M$_*>10^{10.6}$M$_\odot$). There is evolution in both the post-starburst and green valley stellar mass functions, consistent with higher mass galaxies quenching at earlier cosmic times. At intermediate masses (M$_*>10^{10.6}$M$_\odot$) we find a green valley transition timescale of 2.6 Gyr. Alternatively, at $z\sim0.7$ the entire growth rate could be explained by fast-quenching post-starburst galaxies, with a visibility timescale of 0.5 Gyr. At lower redshift, the number density of post-starbursts is so low that an unphysically short visibility window would be required for them to contribute significantly to the quiescent population growth. The importance of the fast-quenching route may rapidly diminish at $z<1$. However, at high masses (M$_*>10^{11}$M$_\odot$), there is tension between the large number of candidate transition galaxies compared to the slow growth of the quiescent population. This could be resolved if not all high mass post-starburst and green-valley galaxies are transitioning from star-forming to quiescent, for example if they rejuvenate out of the quiescent population following the accretion of gas and triggering of star formation, or if they fail to completely quench their star formation.
  • We introduce a method for modeling disk galaxies designed to take full advantage of data from integral field spectroscopy (IFS). The method fits equilibrium models to simultaneously reproduce the surface brightness, rotation and velocity dispersion profiles of a galaxy. The models are fully self-consistent 6D distribution functions for a galaxy with a Sersic-profile stellar bulge, exponential disk and parametric dark matter halo, generated by an updated version of GalactICS. By creating realistic flux-weighted maps of the kinematic moments (flux, mean velocity and dispersion), we simultaneously fit photometric and spectroscopic data using both maximum-likelihood and Bayesian (MCMC) techniques. We apply the method to a GAMA spiral galaxy (G79635) with kinematics from the SAMI Galaxy Survey and deep $g$- and $r$-band photometry from the VST-KiDS survey, comparing parameter constraints with those from traditional 2D bulge-disk decomposition. Our method returns broadly consistent results for shared parameters, while constraining the mass-to-light ratios of stellar components and reproducing the HI-inferred circular velocity well beyond the limits of the SAMI data. While the method is tailored for fitting integral field kinematic data, it can use other dynamical constraints like central fibre dispersions and \HI circular velocities, and is well-suited for modelling galaxies with a combination of deep imaging and HI and/or optical spectra (resolved or otherwise). Our implementation (MagRite) is computationally efficient and can generate well-resolved models and kinematic maps in under a minute on modern processors.
  • Using the stellar kinematic maps and ancillary imaging data from the Sydney AAO Multi Integral field (SAMI) Galaxy Survey, the intrinsic shape of kinematically-selected samples of galaxies is inferred. We implement an efficient and optimised algorithm to fit the intrinsic shape of galaxies using an established method to simultaneously invert the distributions of apparent ellipticities and kinematic misalignments. The algorithm output compares favourably with previous studies of the intrinsic shape of galaxies based on imaging alone and our re-analysis of the ATLAS3D data. Our results indicate that most galaxies are oblate axisymmetric. We show empirically that the intrinsic shape of galaxies varies as a function of their rotational support as measured by the "spin" parameter proxy Lambda_Re. In particular, low spin systems have a higher occurrence of triaxiality, while high spin systems are more intrinsically flattened and axisymmetric. The intrinsic shape of galaxies is linked to their formation and merger histories. Galaxies with high spin values have intrinsic shapes consistent with dissipational minor mergers, while the intrinsic shape of low-spin systems is consistent with dissipationless multi-merger assembly histories. This range in assembly histories inferred from intrinsic shapes is broadly consistent with expectations from cosmological simulations.
  • In this paper, we compare the radio emission at 1.4 GHz with optical outflow signatures of edge-on galaxies. We report observations of six edge-on star-forming galaxies in the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey with 1.4 GHz luminosities $> 1\times10^{21}$ W Hz$^{-1}$. Extended minor axis optical emission is detected with enhanced \nii/H$\alpha$ line ratios and velocity dispersions consistent with galactic winds in three of six galaxies. These galaxies may host outflows driven by a combination of thermal and cosmic ray processes. We find that galaxies with the strongest wind signatures have extended radio morphologies. Our results form a baseline for understanding the driving mechanisms of galactic winds.
  • In the local Universe, the growth of massive galaxy clusters mainly operates through the continuous accretion of group-scale systems. The infalling group in Abell 2142 is the poster child of such an accreting group, and as such, it is an ideal target to study the astrophysical processes induced by structure formation. We present the results of a deep (200 ks) observation of this structure with Chandra, which highlights the complexity of this system in exquisite detail. In the core of the group, the spatial resolution of Chandra reveals the presence of a leading edge and a complex AGN-induced activity. The morphology of the stripped gas tail appears straight in the innermost 250 kpc, suggesting that magnetic draping efficiently shields the gas from its surroundings. However, beyond $\sim300$ kpc from the core, the tail flares and the morphology becomes strongly irregular, which could be explained by a breaking of the drape, e.g. because of turbulent motions. The power spectrum of surface-brightness fluctuations is relatively flat ($P_{2D}\propto k^{-2.3}$), which indicates that thermal conduction is strongly inhibited even beyond the region where magnetic draping is effective. The amplitude of density fluctuations in the tail is consistent with a mild level of turbulence with a Mach number $M_{3D}\sim0.1-0.25$. Overall, our results show that the processes leading to the thermalization and mixing of the infalling gas are slow and relatively inefficient.
  • Recently, large samples of visually classified early-type galaxies (ETGs) containing dust have been identified using space-based infrared observations with the Herschel Space Telescope. The presence of large quantities of dust in massive ETGs is peculiar as X-ray halos of these galaxies are expected to destroy dust in 10 Myr (or less). This has sparked a debate regarding the origin of the dust: is it internally produced by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, or is it accreted externally through mergers? We examine the 2D stellar and ionised gas kinematics of dusty ETGs using IFS observations from the SAMI galaxy survey, and integrated star-formation rates, stellar masses, and dust masses from the GAMA survey. Only 8% (4/49) of visually-classified ETGs are kinematically consistent with being dispersion-supported systems. These "dispersion-dominated galaxies" exhibit discrepancies between stellar and ionised gas kinematics, either offsets in the kinematic position angle or large differences in the rotational velocity, and are outliers in star-formation rate at a fixed dust mass compared to normal star-forming galaxies. These properties are suggestive of recent merger activity. The remaining 90% of dusty ETGs have low velocity dispersions and/or large circular velocities, typical of "rotation-dominated galaxies". These results, along with the general evidence of published works on X-ray emission in ETGs, suggest that they are unlikely to host hot, X-ray gas consistent with their low stellar mass when compared to dispersion-dominated galaxies. This means dust will be long lived and thus these galaxies do not require external scenarios for the origin of their dust content.
  • We describe the selection of galaxies targeted in eight low redshift clusters (APMCC0917, A168, A4038, EDCC442, A3880, A2399, A119 and A85; $0.029 < z < 0.058$) as part of the Sydney-AAO Multi-Object integral field Spectrograph Galaxy Survey (SAMI-GS). We have conducted a redshift survey of these clusters using the AAOmega multi-object spectrograph on the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope. The redshift survey is used to determine cluster membership and to characterise the dynamical properties of the clusters. In combination with existing data, the survey resulted in 21,257 reliable redshift measurements and 2899 confirmed cluster member galaxies. Our redshift catalogue has a high spectroscopic completeness ($\sim 94\%$) for $r_{\rm petro} \leq 19.4$ and clustercentric distances $R< 2\rm{R}_{200}$. We use the confirmed cluster member positions and redshifts to determine cluster velocity dispersion, $\rm{R}_{200}$, virial and caustic masses, as well as cluster structure. The clusters have virial masses $14.25 \leq {\rm log }({\rm M}_{200}/\rm{M}_{\odot}) \leq 15.19$. The cluster sample exhibits a range of dynamical states, from relatively relaxed-appearing systems, to clusters with strong indications of merger-related substructure. Aperture- and PSF-matched photometry are derived from SDSS and VST/ATLAS imaging and used to estimate stellar masses. These estimates, in combination with the redshifts, are used to define the input target catalogue for the cluster portion of the SAMI-GS. The primary SAMI-GS cluster targets have $R< \rm{R}_{200}$, velocities $|v_{\rm pec}| < 3.5\sigma_{200}$ and stellar masses $9.5 \leq {\rm log(M}^*_{approx}/\rm{M}_{\odot}) \leq 12$. Finally, we give an update on the SAMI-GS progress for the cluster regions.
  • The merging history of galaxies can be traced with studies of dynamically close pairs. These consist of a massive primary galaxy and a less massive secondary (or satellite) galaxy. The study of the stellar populations of secondary (lower mass) galaxies in close pairs provides a way to understand galaxy growth by mergers. Here we focus on systems involving at least one massive galaxy - with stellar mass above $10^{11}M_\odot$ in the highly complete GAMA survey. Our working sample comprises 2,692 satellite galaxy spectra (0.1<z<0.3). These spectra are combined into high S/N stacks, and binned according to both an "internal" parameter, the stellar mass of the satellite galaxy (i.e. the secondary), and an "external" parameter, selecting either the mass of the primary in the pair, or the mass of the corresponding dark matter halo. We find significant variations in the age of the populations with respect to environment. At fixed mass, satellites around the most massive galaxies are older and possibly more metal rich, with age differences ~1-2Gyr within the subset of lower mass satellites ($\sim 10^{10}M_\odot$). These variations are similar when stacking with respect to the halo mass of the group where the pair is embedded. The population trends in the lower-mass satellites are consistent with the old stellar ages found in the outer regions of massive galaxies.
  • We study the properties of kinematically disturbed galaxies in the SAMI Galaxy Survey using a quantitative criterion, based on kinemetry (Krajnovic et al.). The approach, similar to the application of kinemetry by Shapiro et al. uses ionised gas kinematics, probed by H{\alpha} emission. By this method 23+/-7% of our 360-galaxy sub-sample of the SAMI Galaxy Survey are kinematically asymmetric. Visual classifications agree with our kinemetric results for 90% of asymmetric and 95% of normal galaxies. We find stellar mass and kinematic asymmetry are inversely correlated and that kinematic asymmetry is both more frequent and stronger in low-mass galaxies. This builds on previous studies that found high fractions of kinematic asymmetry in low mass galaxies using a variety of different methods. Concentration of star forma- tion and kinematic disturbance are found to be correlated, confirming results found in previous work. This effect is stronger for high mass galaxies (log(M*) > 10) and indicates that kinematic disturbance is linked to centrally concentrated star formation. Comparison of the inner (within 0.5Re) and outer H{\alpha} equivalent widths of asymmetric and normal galaxies shows a small but significant increase in inner equivalent width for asymmetric galaxies.
  • We use data from the Sydney-AAO Multi-Object Integral Field Spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey to investigate the spatially-resolved signatures of the environmental quenching of star formation in galaxies. Using dust-corrected measurements of the distribution of H$\alpha$ emission we measure the radial profiles of star formation in a sample of 201 star-forming galaxies covering three orders of magnitude in stellar mass (M$_{*}$; $10^{8.1}$-$10^{10.95}\, $M$_{\odot}$) and in $5^{th}$ nearest neighbour local environment density ($\Sigma_{5}$; $10^{-1.3}$-$10^{2.1}\,$Mpc$^{-2}$). We show that star formation rate gradients in galaxies are steeper in dense ($\log_{10}(\Sigma_{5}/$Mpc$^{2})>0.5$) environments by $0.58\pm 0.29\, dex\, $r$_{e}^{-1}$ in galaxies with stellar masses in the range $10^{10}<$M$_{*}/$M$_{\odot}<10^{11}$ and that this steepening is accompanied by a reduction in the integrated star formation rate. However, for any given stellar mass or environment density the star-formation morphology of galaxies shows large scatter. We also measure the degree to which the star formation is centrally concentrated using the unitless scale-radius ratio ($r_{50,H\alpha}/r_{50,cont}$), which compares the extent of ongoing star formation to previous star formation. With this metric we find that the fraction of galaxies with centrally concentrated star formation increases with environment density, from $\sim 5\pm 4\%$ in low-density environments ($\log_{10}(\Sigma_{5}/$Mpc$^{2})<0.0$) to $30\pm 15\%$ in the highest density environments ($\log_{10}(\Sigma_{5}/$Mpc$^{2})>1.0$). These lines of evidence strongly suggest that with increasing local environment density the star formation in galaxies is suppressed, and that this starts in their outskirts such that quenching occurs in an outside-in fashion in dense environments and is not instantaneous.
  • The growth of brightest cluster galaxies is closely related to the properties of their host cluster. We present evidence for dry mergers as the dominant source of BCG mass growth at $z\lesssim1$ in the XXL 100 brightest cluster sample. We use the global red sequence, H$\alpha$ emission and mean star formation history to show that BCGs in the sample possess star formation levels comparable to field ellipticals of similar stellar mass and redshift. XXL 100 brightest clusters are less massive on average than those in other X-ray selected samples such as LoCuSS or HIFLUGCS. Few clusters in the sample display high central gas concentration, rendering inefficient the growth of BCGs via star formation resulting from the accretion of cool gas. Using measures of the relaxation state of their host clusters, we show that BCGs grow as relaxation proceeds. We find that the BCG stellar mass corresponds to a relatively constant fraction 1\%\ of the total cluster mass in relaxed systems. We also show that, following a cluster scale merger event, the BCG stellar mass lags behind the expected value from the M$_{cluster}$ - M$_{BCG}$ relation but subsequently accretes stellar mass via dry mergers as the BCG and cluster evolve towards a relaxed state.
  • We investigate the relationship between stellar and gas specific angular momentum $j$, stellar mass $M_{*}$ and optical morphology for a sample of 488 galaxies extracted from the SAMI Galaxy Survey. We find that $j$, measured within one effective radius, monotonically increases with $M_{*}$ and that, for $M_{*}>$10$^{9.5}$ M$_{\odot}$, the scatter in this relation strongly correlates with optical morphology (i.e., visual classification and S\'ersic index). These findings confirm that massive galaxies of all types lie on a plane relating mass, angular momentum and stellar light distribution, and suggest that the large-scale morphology of a galaxy is regulated by its mass and dynamical state. We show that the significant scatter in the $M_{*}-j$ relation is accounted for by the fact that, at fixed stellar mass, the contribution of ordered motions to the dynamical support of galaxies varies by at least a factor of three. Indeed, the stellar spin parameter (quantified via $\lambda_R$) correlates strongly with S\'ersic and concentration indices. This correlation is particularly strong once slow-rotators are removed from the sample, showing that late-type galaxies and early-type fast rotators form a continuous class of objects in terms of their kinematic properties.
  • We compare common star-formation rate (SFR) indicators in the local Universe in the GAMA equatorial fields (around 160 sq. deg.), using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from GALEX, far-infrared (FIR) and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) photometry from H-ATLAS, and Halpha spectroscopy from the GAMA survey. With a high-quality sample of 745 galaxies (median redshift 0.08), we consider three SFR tracers: UV luminosity corrected for dust attenuation using the UV spectral slope beta (SFRUV,corr), Halpha line luminosity corrected for dust using the Balmer decrement (BD) (SFRHalpha,corr), and the combination of UV and IR emission (SFRUV+IR). We demonstrate that SFRUV,corr can be reconciled with the other two tracers after applying attenuation corrections by calibrating IRX (i.e. the IR to UV luminosity ratio) and attenuation in the Halpha (derived from BD) against beta. However, beta on its own is very unlikely to be a reliable attenuation indicator. We find that attenuation correction factors depend on parameters such as stellar mass, z and dust temperature (Tdust), but not on Halpha equivalent width (EW) or Sersic index. Due to the large scatter in the IRX vs beta correlation, when compared to SFRUV+IR, the beta-corrected SFRUV,corr exhibits systematic deviations as a function of IRX, BD and Tdust.
  • With Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations, we have discovered a diverse assembly of steep spectrum emission that is apparently associated with the intra cluster medium (ICM) of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 2034. Such a rich variety of complex emission associated with the ICM has been observed in few other clusters. This not only indicates that Abell 2034 is a more interesting and complex system than previously thought but it also demonstrates the importance of sensitive and high-resolution, low-frequency observations. These observations can reveal emission from relativistic particles which have been accelerated to sufficient energy to produce observable emission or have had their high energy maintained by mechanisms in the ICM. The most prominent feature in our maps is a bright bulb of emission connected to two steep spectrum filamentary structures, the longest of which extends perpendicular to the merger axis for 0.5Mpc across the south of the cluster. The origin of these objects is unclear, with no shock detected in the X-ray images and no obvious connection with cluster galaxies or AGNs. We also find that the X-ray bright region of the cluster coincides with a giant radio halo with an irregular morphology and a very steep spectrum. In addition, the cluster hosts up to three possible radio relics, which are misaligned with the cluster X-ray emission. Finally, we have identified multiple regions of emission with a very steep spectral index that seem to be associated with either tailed radio galaxies or a shock.
  • Line-of-sight velocities of gas and stars can constrain dark matter (DM) within rotationally supported galaxies if they trace circular orbits extensively. Photometric asymmetries may signify non-circular motions, requiring spectra with dense spatial coverage. Our integral-field spectroscopy of 178 galaxies spanned the mass range of the SAMI Galaxy Survey. We derived circular speed curves (CSCs) of gas and stars from non-parametric Diskfit fits out to $r\sim2r_e$. For 12/14 with measured H I profiles, ionized gas and H I maximum velocities agreed. We fitted mass-follows-light models to 163 galaxies by approximating the radial starlight profile as nested, very flattened mass homeoids viewed as a S\'ersic form. Fitting broad-band SEDs to SDSS images gave median stellar mass/light 1.7 assuming a Kroupa IMF vs. 2.6 dynamically. Two-thirds of the dynamical mass/light measures were consistent with star+remnant IMFs. One-fifth required upscaled starlight to fit, hence comparable mass of unobserved baryons and/or DM distributed similarly across the SAMI aperture that came to dominate motions as the starlight CSC declined rapidly. The rest had mass distributed differently from starlight. Subtracting fits of S\'ersic profiles to 13 VIKING Z-band images revealed residual weak bars. Near the bar PA, we assessed m = 2 streaming velocities, and found deviations usually <30 km/s from the CSC; three showed no deviation. Thus, asymmetries rarely influenced our CSCs despite co-located shock-indicating, emission-line flux ratios in more than 2/3.
  • Both theoretical predictions and observations of the very nearby Universe suggest that low-mass galaxies (log$_{10}$[M$_{*}$/M$_{\odot}$]<9.5) are likely to remain star-forming unless they are affected by their local environment. To test this premise, we compare and contrast the local environment of both passive and star-forming galaxies as a function of stellar mass, using the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey. We find that passive fractions are higher in both interacting pair and group galaxies than the field at all stellar masses, and that this effect is most apparent in the lowest mass galaxies. We also find that essentially all passive log$_{10}$[M$_{*}$/M$_{\odot}$]<8.5 galaxies are found in pair/group environments, suggesting that local interactions with a more massive neighbour cause them to cease forming new stars. We find that the effects of immediate environment (local galaxy-galaxy interactions) in forming passive systems increases with decreasing stellar mass, and highlight that this is potentially due to increasing interaction timescales giving sufficient time for the galaxy to become passive via starvation. We then present a simplistic model to test this premise, and show that given our speculative assumptions, it is consistent with our observed results.
  • We present the SAMI Pilot Survey, consisting of integral field spectroscopy of 106 galaxies across three galaxy clusters, Abell 85, Abell 168 and Abell 2399. The galaxies were selected by absolute magnitude to have $M_r<-20.25$ mag. The survey, using the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI), comprises observations of galaxies of all morphological types with 75\% of the sample being early-type galaxies (ETGs) and 25\% being late-type galaxies (LTGs). Stellar velocity and velocity dispersion maps are derived for all 106 galaxies in the sample. The $\lambda_{R}$ parameter, a proxy for the specific stellar angular momentum, is calculated for each galaxy in the sample. We find a trend between $\lambda_{R}$ and galaxy concentration such that LTGs are less concentrated higher angular momentum systems, with the fast-rotating ETGs (FRs) more concentrated and lower in angular momentum. This suggests that some dynamical processes are involved in transforming LTGs to FRs, though a significant overlap between the $\lambda_{R}$ distributions of these classes of galaxies implies that this is just one piece of a more complicated picture. We measure the kinematic misalignment angle, $\Psi$, for the ETGs in the sample, to probe the intrinsic shapes of the galaxies. We find the majority of FRs (83\%) to be aligned, consistent with them being oblate spheroids (i.e. disks). The slow rotating ETGs (SRs), on the other hand, are significantly more likely to show kinematic misalignment (only 38\% are aligned). This confirms previous results that SRs are likely to be mildly triaxial systems.
  • We examine the properties of galaxies in the Galaxies and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey located in voids with radii $>10~h^{-1}$ Mpc. Utilising the GAMA equatorial survey, 592 void galaxies are identified out to z~0.1 brighter than $M_{r} = -18.4$, our magnitude completeness limit. Using the $W_{\rm{H\alpha}}$ vs. [NII]/H$\alpha$ (WHAN) line strength diagnostic diagram, we classify their spectra as star forming, AGN, or dominated by old stellar populations. For objects more massive than $5\times10^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$, we identify a sample of 26 void galaxies with old stellar populations classed as passive and retired galaxies in the WHAN diagnostic diagram, else they lack any emission lines in their spectra. When matched to WISE mid-IR photometry, these passive and retired galaxies exhibit a range of mid-IR colour, with a number of void galaxies exhibiting [4.6]-[12] colours inconsistent with completely quenched stellar populations, with a similar spread in colour seen for a randomly drawn non-void comparison sample. We hypothesise that a number of these galaxies host obscured star formation, else they are star forming outside of their central regions targeted for single fibre spectroscopy. When matched to a randomly drawn sample of non-void galaxies, the void and non-void galaxies exhibit similar properties in terms of optical and mid-IR colour, morphology, and star formation activity, suggesting comparable mass assembly and quenching histories. A trend in mid-IR [4.6]-[12] colour is seen, such that both void and non-void galaxies with quenched/passive colours <1.5 typically have masses higher than $10^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$, where internally driven processes play an increasingly important role in galaxy evolution.
  • The modification of star formation (SF) in galaxy interactions is a complex process, with SF observed to be both enhanced in major mergers and suppressed in minor pair interactions. Such changes likely to arise on short timescales and be directly related to the galaxy-galaxy interaction time. Here we investigate the link between dynamical phase and direct measures of SF on different timescales for pair galaxies, targeting numerous star-formation rate (SFR) indicators and comparing to pair separation, individual galaxy mass and pair mass ratio. We split our sample into the higher (primary) and lower (secondary) mass galaxies in each pair and find that SF is indeed enhanced in all primary galaxies but suppressed in secondaries of minor mergers. We find that changes in SF of primaries is consistent in both major and minor mergers, suggesting that SF in the more massive galaxy is agnostic to pair mass ratio. We also find that SF is enhanced/suppressed more strongly for short-time duration SFR indicators (e.g. H-alpha), highlighting recent changes to SF in these galaxies, which are likely to be induced by the interaction. We propose a scenario where the lower mass galaxy has its SF suppressed by gas heating or stripping, while the higher mass galaxy has its SF enhanced, potentially by tidal gas turbulence and shocks. This is consistent with the seemingly contradictory observations for both SF suppression and enhancement in close pairs.
  • We have observed two kinematically offset active galactic nuclei (AGN), whose ionised gas is at a different line-of-sight velocity to their host galaxies, with the SAMI integral field spectrograph (IFS). One of the galaxies shows gas kinematics very different to the stellar kinematics, indicating a recent merger or accretion event. We demonstrate that the star formation associated with this event was triggered within the last 100 Myr. The other galaxy shows simple disc rotation in both gas and stellar kinematics, aligned with each other, but in the central region has signatures of an outflow driven by the AGN. Other than the outflow, neither galaxy shows any discontinuity in the ionised gas kinematics at the galaxy's centre. We conclude that in these two cases there is no direct evidence of the AGN being in a supermassive black hole binary system. Our study demonstrates that selecting kinematically offset AGN from single-fibre spectroscopy provides, by definition, samples of kinematically peculiar objects, but IFS or other data are required to determine their true nature.
  • The SAMI Galaxy Survey will observe 3400 galaxies with the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) in a 3-year survey which began in 2013. We present the throughput of the SAMI system, the science basis and specifications for the target selection, the survey observation plan and the combined properties of the selected galaxies. The survey includes four volume limited galaxy samples based on cuts in a proxy for stellar mass, along with low-stellar mass dwarf galaxies all selected from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA regions were selected because of the vast array of ancillary data available, including ultraviolet through to radio bands. These fields are on the celestial equator at 9, 12, and 14.5 hours, and cover a total of 144 square degrees (in GAMA-I). Higher density environments are also included with the addition of eight clusters. The clusters have spectroscopy from 2dFGRS and SDSS and photometry in regions covered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and/or VLT Survey Telescope/ATLAS. The aim is to cover a broad range in stellar mass and environment, and therefore the primary survey targets cover redshifts 0.004 < z < 0.095, magnitudes r$_{pet}$ < 19.4, stellar masses $10^{7} - 10^{12}$ M$_{sol}$, and environments from isolated field galaxies through groups to clusters of $10^{15}$ M$_{sol}$.
  • We present bivariate luminosity and stellar mass functions of H$\alpha$ star forming galaxies drawn from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. While optically deep spectroscopic observations of GAMA over a wide sky area enable the detection of a large number of $0.001<{SFR}_{H\alpha}$ (M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$)$<100$ galaxies, the requirement for an H$\alpha$ detection in targets selected from an $r$-band magnitude limited survey leads to an incompleteness due to missing optically faint star forming galaxies. Using $z<0.1$ bivariate distributions as a reference we model the higher-$z$ distributions, thereby approximating a correction for the missing optically faint star forming galaxies to the local SFR and stellar mass densities. Furthermore, we obtain the $r$-band LFs and stellar mass functions of H$\alpha$ star forming galaxies from the bivariate LFs. As our sample is selected on the basis of detected H$\alpha$ emission, a direct tracer of on-going star formation, this sample represents a true star forming galaxy sample, and is drawn from both photometrically classified blue and red sub-populations, though mostly from the blue population. On average 20-30% of red galaxies at all stellar masses are star forming, implying that these galaxies may be dusty star forming systems.
  • We present a methodology for the regularisation and combination of sparse sampled and irregularly gridded observations from fibre-optic multi-object integral-field spectroscopy. The approach minimises interpolation and retains image resolution on combining sub-pixel dithered data. We discuss the methodology in the context of the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey underway at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The SAMI instrument uses 13 fibre bundles to perform high-multiplex integral-field spectroscopy across a one degree diameter field of view. The SAMI Galaxy Survey is targeting 3000 galaxies drawn from the full range of galaxy environments. We demonstrate the subcritical sampling of the seeing and incomplete fill factor for the integral-field bundles results in only a 10% degradation in the final image resolution recovered. We also implement a new methodology for tracking covariance between elements of the resulting datacubes which retains 90% of the covariance information while incurring only a modest increase in the survey data volume.
  • We present the Early Data Release of the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. The SAMI Galaxy Survey is an ongoing integral field spectroscopic survey of ~3400 low-redshift (z<0.12) galaxies, covering galaxies in the field and in groups within the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey regions, and a sample of galaxies in clusters. In the Early Data Release, we publicly release the fully calibrated datacubes for a representative selection of 107 galaxies drawn from the GAMA regions, along with information about these galaxies from the GAMA catalogues. All datacubes for the Early Data Release galaxies can be downloaded individually or as a set from the SAMI Galaxy Survey website. In this paper we also assess the quality of the pipeline used to reduce the SAMI data, giving metrics that quantify its performance at all stages in processing the raw data into calibrated datacubes. The pipeline gives excellent results throughout, with typical sky subtraction residuals in the continuum of 0.9-1.2 per cent, a relative flux calibration uncertainty of 4.1 per cent (systematic) plus 4.3 per cent (statistical), and atmospheric dispersion removed with an accuracy of 0."09, less than a fifth of a spaxel.