• We present observations of DES16C2nm, the first spectroscopically confirmed hydrogen-free superluminous supernova (SLSN-I) at redshift z~2. DES16C2nm was discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Supernova Program, with follow-up photometric data from the Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope supplementing the DES data. Spectroscopic observations confirm DES16C2nm to be at z=1.998, and spectroscopically similar to Gaia16apd (a SLSN-I at z=0.102), with a peak absolute magnitude of U=-22.26$\pm$0.06. The high redshift of DES16C2nm provides a unique opportunity to study the ultraviolet (UV) properties of SLSNe-I. Combining DES16C2nm with ten similar events from the literature, we show that there exists a homogeneous class of SLSNe-I in the UV (~2500A), with peak luminosities in the (rest-frame) U band, and increasing absorption to shorter wavelengths. There is no evidence that the mean photometric and spectroscopic properties of SLSNe-I differ between low (z<1) and high redshift (z>1), but there is clear evidence of diversity in the spectrum at <2000A, possibly caused by the variations in temperature between events. No significant correlations are observed between spectral line velocities and photometric luminosity. Using these data, we estimate that SLSNe-I can be discovered to z=3.8 by DES. While SLSNe-I are typically identified from their blue observed colors at low redshift (z<1), we highlight that at z>2 these events appear optically red, peaking in the observer-frame z-band. Such characteristics are critical to identify these objects with future facilities such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Euclid, and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, which should detect such SLSNe-I to z=3.5, 3.7, and 6.6, respectively.
  • Core collapse supernova (CCSN) rates suffer from large uncertainties as many CCSNe exploding in regions of bright background emission and significant dust extinction remain unobserved. Such a shortfall is particularly prominent in luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), which have high star formation (and thus CCSN) rates and host bright and crowded nuclear regions, where large extinctions and reduced search detection efficiency likely lead to a significant fraction of CCSNe remaining undiscovered. We present the first results of project SUNBIRD (Supernovae UNmasked By Infra-Red Detection), where we aim to uncover CCSNe that otherwise would remain hidden in the complex nuclear regions of LIRGs, and in this way improve the constraints on the fraction that is missed by optical seeing-limited surveys. We observe in the near-infrared 2.15 {\mu}m $K_s$-band, which is less affected by dust extinction compared to the optical, using the multi-conjugate adaptive optics imager GeMS/GSAOI on Gemini South, allowing us to achieve a spatial resolution that lets us probe close in to the nuclear regions. During our pilot program and subsequent first full year we have discovered three CCSNe and one candidate with projected nuclear offsets as small as 200 pc. When compared to the total sample of LIRG CCSNe discovered in the near-IR and optical, we show that our method is singularly effective in uncovering CCSNe in nuclear regions and we conclude that the majority of CCSNe exploding in LIRGs are not detected as a result of dust obscuration and poor spatial resolution.
  • NGC253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst which becomes the best candidate to study the relationship between starburst and AGN activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus. The near infrared spectroscopy could be advantageous in order to shed light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis and through the brightest infrared source. We present evidence showing that the brightest near infrared and mid infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a stellar supercluster, in fact, presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. It is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.0" of the symmetry center of the galactic bar. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H2 rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate observed at 18.3 {\mu}m (Qa) and 12.8 {\mu}m ([NeII]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Br_gamma emission line profile is blue-shifted and this emission line has also the highest equivalent width at this position. All these evidences point out TH7 as the best candidate to be the galactic nucleus of NGC 253.
  • Finding a sample of the most massive clusters with redshifts $z>0.6$ can provide an interesting consistency check of the $\Lambda$ cold dark matter ($\Lambda$CDM) model. Here we present results from our search for clusters with $0.6\lesssim z\lesssim1.0$ where the initial candidates were selected by cross-correlating the RASS faint and bright source catalogues with red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR8. Our survey thus covers $\approx10,000\,\rm{deg^2}$, much larger than previous studies of this kind. Deeper follow-up observations in three bands using the William Herschel Telescope and the Large Binocular Telescope were performed to confirm the candidates, resulting in a sample of 44 clusters for which we present richnesses and red sequence redshifts, as well as spectroscopic redshifts for a subset. At least two of the clusters in our sample are comparable in richness to RCS2-$J$232727.7$-$020437, one of the richest systems discovered to date. We also obtained new observations with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy for a subsample of 21 clusters. For 11 of those we detect the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect signature. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal allows us to estimate $M_{200}$ and check for tension with the cosmological standard model. We find no tension between our cluster masses and the $\Lambda$CDM model.
  • We investigate the globular cluster system of the isolated elliptical NGC 7796, present new photometry of the galaxy, and use published kinematical data to constrain the dark matter content. Deep images in B and R, obtained with the VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph (VIMOS) at the VLT, form the data base. We present isotropic and anisotropic Jeans-models and give a morphological description of the companion dwarf galaxy. The globular cluster system has about 2000 members, so it is not as rich as those of giant ellipticals in galaxy clusters with a comparable stellar mass, but richer than many cluster systems of other isolated ellipticals. The colour distribution of GCs is bimodal, which does not necessarily mean a metallicity bimodality. The kinematic literature data are somewhat inconclusive. The velocity dispersion in the inner parts can be reproduced without dark matter under isotropy. Radially anisotropic models need a low stellar mass-to-light ratio, which would contrast with the old age of the galaxy. A MONDian model is supported by X-ray analysis and previous dynamical modelling, but better data are necessary for a confirmation. The dwarf companion galaxy NGC 7796-1 exhibits tidal tails, multiple nuclei, and very boxy isophotes. NGC 7796 is an old, massive isolated elliptical galaxy with no indications of later major star formation events as seen frequently in other isolated ellipticals. Its relatively rich globular cluster system shows that isolation does not always mean a poor cluster system. The properties of the dwarf companion might indicate a dwarf-dwarf merger. (abridged)
  • Recent ground based near-IR studies of stellar clusters in nearby galaxies have suggested that young clusters remain embedded for 7-10Myr in their progenitor molecular cloud, in conflict with optical based studies which find that clusters are exposed after 1-3Myr. Here, we investigate the role that spatial resolution plays in this apparent conflict. We use a recent catalogue of young ($<10$~Myr) massive ($>5000$~\msun) clusters in the nearby spiral galaxy, M83, along with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging in the optical and near-IR, and ground based near-IR imaging, to see how the colours (and hence estimated properties such as age and extinction) are affected by the aperture size employed, in order to simulate studies of differing resolution. We find that the near-IR is heavily affected by the resolution, and when aperture sizes $>40$~pc are used, all young/blue clusters move red-ward in colour space, which results in their appearance as heavily extincted clusters. However, this is due to contamination from nearby sources and nebular emission, and is not an extinction effect. Optical colours are much less affected by resolution. Due to the larger affect of contamination in the near-IR, we find that, in some cases, clusters will appear to show near-IR excess when large ($>20$~pc) apertures are used. Our results explain why few young ($<6$~Myr), low extinction ($\av < 1$~mag) clusters have been found in recent ground based near-IR studies of cluster populations, while many such clusters have been found in higher resolution HST based studies. Additionally, resolution effects appear to (at least partially) explain the origin of the near-IR excess that has been found in a number of extragalactic YMCs.
  • Metagenomics is an approach for characterizing environmental microbial communities in situ, it allows their functional and taxonomic characterization and to recover sequences from uncultured taxa. For communities of up to medium diversity, e.g. excluding environments such as soil, this is often achieved by a combination of sequence assembly and binning, where sequences are grouped into 'bins' representing taxa of the underlying microbial community from which they originate. Assignment to low-ranking taxonomic bins is an important challenge for binning methods as is scalability to Gb-sized datasets generated with deep sequencing techniques. One of the best available methods for the recovery of species bins from an individual metagenome sample is the expert-trained PhyloPythiaS package, where a human expert decides on the taxa to incorporate in a composition-based taxonomic metagenome classifier and identifies the 'training' sequences using marker genes directly from the sample. Due to the manual effort involved, this approach does not scale to multiple metagenome samples and requires substantial expertise, which researchers who are new to the area may not have. With these challenges in mind, we have developed PhyloPythiaS+, a successor to our previously described method PhyloPythia(S). The newly developed + component performs the work previously done by the human expert. PhyloPythiaS+ also includes a new k-mer counting algorithm, which accelerated k-mer counting 100-fold and reduced the overall execution time of the software by a factor of three. Our software allows to analyze Gb-sized metagenomes with inexpensive hardware, and to recover species or genera-level bins with low error rates in a fully automated fashion.
  • Constraints on the mass distribution in high-redshift clusters of galaxies are not currently very strong. We aim to constrain the mass profile, M(r), and dynamical status of the $z \sim 0.8$ LCDCS 0504 cluster of galaxies characterized by prominent giant gravitational arcs near its center. Our analysis is based on deep X-ray, optical, and infrared imaging, as well as optical spectroscopy. We model the mass distribution of the cluster with three different mass density profiles, whose parameters are constrained by the strong lensing features of the inner cluster region, by the X-ray emission from the intra-cluster medium, and by the kinematics of 71 cluster members. We obtain consistent M(r) determinations from three methods (dispersion-kurtosis, caustics and MAMPOSSt), out to the cluster virial radius and beyond. The mass profile inferred by the strong lensing analysis in the central cluster region is slightly above, but still consistent with, the kinematics estimate. On the other hand, the X-ray based M(r) is significantly below both the kinematics and strong lensing estimates. Theoretical predictions from $\Lambda$CDM cosmology for the concentration--mass relation are in agreement with our observational results, when taking into account the uncertainties in both the observational and theoretical estimates. There appears to be a central deficit in the intra-cluster gas mass fraction compared to nearby clusters. Despite the relaxed appearance of this cluster, the determinations of its mass profile by different probes show substantial discrepancies, the origin of which remains to be determined. The extension of a similar dynamical analysis to other clusters of the DAFT/FADA survey will allow to shed light on the possible systematics that affect the determination of mass profiles of high-z clusters, possibly related to our incomplete understanding of intracluster baryon physics.
  • We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range is available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter cosmology.XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a beta-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. Only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first cluster pericentre approach and are relatively recent infalls. We also find hints of a decreasing X-ray gas density profile core radius with redshift. The percentage of mass included in substructures was found to be roughly constant with redshift with values of 5-15%, in agreement both with the general CDM framework and with the results of numerical simulations. Galaxies in substructures show the same general behaviour as regular cluster galaxies; however, in substructures, there is a deficiency of both late type and old stellar population galaxies. Late type galaxies with recent bursts of star formation seem to be missing in the substructures close to the bottom of the host cluster potential well. However, our sample would need to be increased to allow a more robust analysis.
  • This paper studies the relative spatial distribution of red-sequence and blue-cloud galaxies, and their relation to the dark matter distribution in the COMBO-17 survey as function of scale down to z~1. We measure the 2nd-order auto- and cross-correlation functions of galaxy clustering and express the relative biasing by using aperture statistics. Also estimated is the relation between the galaxies and the dark matter distribution exploiting galaxy-galaxy lensing (GGL). All observables are further interpreted in terms of a halo model. To fully explain the galaxy clustering cross-correlation function with a halo model, we need to introduce a new parameter,R, that describes the statistical relation between numbers of red and blue galaxies within the same halo. We find that red and blue galaxies are clearly differently clustered, a significant evolution of the relative clustering with redshift was not found. There is evidence for a scale-dependence of relative biasing. The relative clustering, the GGL and, with some tension, the galaxy numbers can be explained consistently within a halo model. For the cross-correlation function one requires a HOD variance that becomes Poisson even for relatively small occupancy numbers. For our sample, this rules out with high confidence a "Poisson satellite" scenario as found in semi-analytical models. Red galaxies have to be concentrated towards the halo centre, either by a central red galaxy or by a concentration parameter above that for dark matter.The value of R depends on the presence or absence of central galaxies: If no central galaxies or only red central galaxies are allowed, R is consistent with zero, whereas a positive correlation $R=+0.5\pm0.2$ is needed if both blue and red galaxies can have central galaxies.[ABRIDGED]
  • We searched for a fast moving H$\alpha$ shell around the Crab nebula. Such a shell could account for this supernova remnant's missing mass, and carry enough kinetic energy to make SN 1054 a normal Type II event. Deep H$\alpha$ images were obtained with WFI at the 2.2m MPG/ESO telescope and with MOSCA at the 2.56m NOT. The data are compared with theoretical expectations derived from shell models with ballistic gas motion, constant temperature, constant degree of ionisation and a power law for the density profile. We reach a surface brightness limit of $5\times10^{-8} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} sr^{-1}$. A halo is detected, but at a much higher surface brightness than our models of recombination emission and dust scattering predict. Only collisional excitation of Ly$\beta$ with partial de-excitation to H$\alpha$ could explain such amplitudes. We show that the halo seen is due to PSF scattering and thus not related to a real shell. We also investigated the feasibility of a spectroscopic detection of high-velocity H$\alpha$ gas towards the centre of the Crab nebula. Modelling of the emission spectra shows that such gas easily evades detection in the complex spectral environment of the H$\alpha$-line. PSF scattering significantly contaminates our data, preventing a detection of the predicted fast shell. A real halo with observed peak flux of about $2\times10^{-7} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} sr^{-1} $ could still be accomodated within our error bars, but our models predict a factor 4 lower surface brightness. 8m class telescopes could detect such fluxes unambiguously, provided that a sufficiently accurate PSF model is available. Finally, we note that PSF scattering also affects other research areas where faint haloes are searched for around bright and extended targets.
  • We present the CFHTLS-Archive-Research Survey (CARS). It is a virtual multi-colour survey based on public archive images from the CFHT-Legacy-Survey. Our main scientific interests in CARS are optical searches for galaxy clusters from low to high redshift and their subsequent study with photometric and weak-gravitational lensing techniques. As a first step of the project we present multi-colour catalogues from 37 sq. degrees of the CFHTLS-Wide component. Our aims are to create astrometrically and photometrically well calibrated co-added images. Second goal are five-band (u*, g', r', i', z') multi-band catalogues with an emphasis on reliable estimates for object colours. These are subsequently used for photometric redshift estimates. The article explains in detail data processing, multi-colour catalogue creation and photometric redshift estimation. Furthermore we apply a novel technique, based on studies of the angular galaxy cross-correlation function, to quantify the reliability of photo-z's. The accuracy of our high-confidence photo-z sample (10-15 galaxies per sq. arcmin) is estimated to $\sigma_{\Delta_z/(1+z)}\approx 0.04-0.05$ up to i'<24 with typically only 1-3% outliers. Interested users can obtain access to our data by request to the authors.
  • We report on the highly extinguished afterglow of GRB 070306 and the properties of the host galaxy. An optical afterglow was not detected at the location of the burst, but in near-infrared a doubling in brightness during the first night and later power-law decay in the K band provided a clear detection of the afterglow. The host galaxy is relatively bright, R ~ 22.8. An optical low resolution spectrum revealed a largely featureless host galaxy continuum with a single emission line. Higher resolution follow-up spectroscopy shows this emission to be resolved and consisting of two peaks separated by 7 AA, suggesting it to be [O II] at a redshift of z = 1.49594 +- 0.00006. The infrared color H-K = 2 directly reveals significant reddening. By modeling the optical/X-ray spectral energy distribution at t = 1.38 days with an extinguished synchrotron spectrum, we derive A_V = 5.5 +- 0.6 mag. This is among the largest values ever measured for a GRB afterglow and visual extinctions exceeding unity are rare. The importance of early NIR observations is obvious and may soon provide a clearer view into the once elusive 'dark bursts'.
  • The kinematics, shaping, density distribution, expansion distance, and ionized mass of the nebula Hen 2-104, and the nature of its symbiotic Mira are investigated. A combination of multi-epoch HST images and VLT integral field high-resolution spectroscopy is used to study the nebular dynamics both along the line of sight and in the plane of the sky. These observations allow us to construct a 3-D spatio-kinematical model of the nebula, which together with the measurement of its apparent expansion in the plane of the sky over a period of 4 years, provides the expansion parallax for the nebula. The integral field data featuring the [S{\sc ii}] $\lambda\lambda$671.7,673.1 emission line doublet provide us with a density map of the inner lobes of the nebula, which together with the distance estimation allow us to estimate its ionized mass. We find densities ranging from n$_e$=500 to 1000 cm$^{-3}$ in the inner lobes and from 300 to 500cm$^{-3}$ in the outer lobes. We determine an expansion parallax distance of 3.3$\pm$0.9 kpc to Hen 2-104, implying an unexpectedly large ionized mass for the nebula of the order of one tenth of a solar mass.
  • We introduce our publicly available Wide-Field-Imaging reduction pipeline THELI. The procedures applied for the efficient pre-reduction and astrometric calibration are presented. A special emphasis is put on the methods applied to the photometric calibration. As a test case the reduction of optical data from the ESO Deep Public Survey including the WFI-GOODS data is described. The end-products of this project are now available via the ESO archive Advanced Data Products section.
  • [ABRIDGED] The weak gravitational lensing effect is used to infer matter density fluctuations within the field-of-view of the Garching-Bonn Deep Survey (GaBoDS). This information is employed for a statistical comparison of the galaxy distribution to the total matter distribution. The result of this comparison is expressed by means of the linear bias factor, b, the ratio of density fluctuations, and the correlation factor $r$ between density fluctuations. The total galaxy sample is divided into three sub-samples using R-band magnitudes and the weak lensing analysis is applied separately for each sub-sample. Together with the photometric redshifts from the related COMBO-17 survey we estimate the typical mean redshifts of these samples with $\bar{z}=0.35, 0.47, 0.61$, respectively. For all three samples, a slight galaxy anti-bias, b~0.8+-0.1, on scales of a few Mpc/h is found; the bias factor shows evidence for a slight scale-dependence. The correlation between galaxy and (dark) matter distribution is high, r~0.6+-0.2, indicating a non-linear or/and stochastic biasing relation between matter and galaxies. Between the three samples no significant evolution with redshift is found.
  • We apply the linear filter for the weak-lensing signal of dark-matter halos developed in Maturi et al. (2005) to the cosmic-shear data extracted from the Garching-Bonn-Deep-Survey (GaBoDS). We wish to search for dark-matter halos through weak-lensing signatures which are significantly above the random and systematic noise level caused by intervening large-scale structures. We employ a linear matched filter which maximises the signal-to-noise ratio by minimising the number of spurious detections caused by the superposition of large-scale structures (LSS). This is achieved by suppressing those spatial frequencies dominated by the LSS contamination. We confirm the improved stability and reliability of the detections achieved with our new filter compared to the commonly-used aperture mass (Schneider, 1996; Schneider et al., 1998) and to the aperture mass based on the shear profile expected for NFW haloes (see e.g. Schirmer et al., 2004; Hennawi & Spergel, 2005). Schirmer et al.~(2006) achieved results comparable to our filter, but probably only because of the low average redshift of the background sources in GaBoDS, which keeps the LSS contamination low. For deeper data, the difference will be more important, as shown by Maturi et al. (2005). We detect fourteen halos on about eighteen square degrees selected from the survey. Five are known clusters, two are associated with over-densities of galaxies visible in the GaBoDS image, and seven have no known optical or X-ray counterparts.
  • Aims. We present a cosmic shear analysis and data validation of 15 square degree high-quality R-band data of the Garching-Bonn Deep Survey obtained with the Wide Field Imager of the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope. Methods. We measure the two-point shear correlation functions to calculate the aperture mass dispersion. Both statistics are used to perform the data quality control. Combining the cosmic shear signal with a photometric redshift distribution of a galaxy sub-sample obtained from two square degree of UBVRI-band observations of the Deep Public Survey we determine constraints for the matter density Omega_m, the mass power spectrum normalisation sigma_8 and the dark energy density Omega_Lambda in the magnitude interval R in [21.5,24.5]. In this magnitude interval the effective number density of source galaxies is n=12.5/sq. arcmin, and their mean redshift is z_m=0.78. To estimate the posterior likelihood we employ the Monte Carlo Markov Chain method. Results. Using the aperture mass dispersion we obtain for the mass power spectrum normalisation sigma_8=0.80 +- 0.10 (1 sigma statistical error) at a fixed matter density Omega_m=0.30 assuming a flat universe with negligible baryon content and marginalising over the Hubble parameter and the uncertainties in the fitted redshift distribution.
  • Aims. In this paper the optical data of the ESO Deep-Public-Survey observed with the Wide Field Imager and reduced with the THELI pipeline are described. Methods. Here we present 63 fully reduced and stacked images. The astrometric and photometric calibrations are discussed and the properties of the images are compared to images released by the ESO Imaging Survey team covering a subset of our data. Results. These images are publicly released to the community. Our main scientific goals with this survey are to study the high-redshift universe by optically pre-selecting high-redshift objects from imaging data and to use VLT instruments for follow-up spectroscopy as well as weak lensing applications.
  • We report the initial results of a VLT/NACO high spatial resolution imaging survey for multiple systems among 58 M-type members of the nearby Upper Scorpius OB association. Nine pairs with separations below 100 have been resolved. Their small angular separations and the similarity in the brightness of the components (DMagK <1 for all of them), indicate there is a reasonable likelihood several of them are true binaries rather than chance projections. Follow-up imaging observations with WHT/LIRIS of the two widest binaries confirm that their near-infrared colours are consistent with physical very low mass binaries. For one of these two binaries, WHT/LIRIS spectra of each component were obtained. We find that the two components have similar M6-M7 spectral types and signatures of low-gravity, as expected for a young brown dwarf binary in this association. Our preliminary results indicate a possible population of very low-mass binaries with semimajor axis in the range 100 AU 150 AU, which has not been seen in the Pleiades open cluster. If these candidates are confirmed (one is confirmed by this work), these results would indicate that the binary properties of very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs may depend on the environment where they form.
  • We present X-ray properties of NGC 300 point sources, extracted from 66 ksec of XMM-Newton data taken in 2000 December and 2001 January. A total of 163 sources were detected in the energy range of 0.3-6 kev. We report on the global properties of the sources detected inside the D25 optical disk, such as the hardness ratio and X-ray fluxes, and on the properties of their optical counterparts found in B, V, and R images from the 2.2m MPG/ESO telescope. Furthermore, we cross-correlate the X-ray sources with SIMBAD, the USNO-A2.0 catalog, and radio catalogues.
  • We present first results of our search for high-redshift galaxies in deep CCD mosaic images. As a pilot study for a larger survey, very deep images of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), taken withWFI@MPG/ESO2.2m, are used to select large samples of 1070 U-band and 565 B-band dropouts with the Lyman-break method. The data of these Lyman-break galaxies are made public as an electronic table. These objects are good candidates for galaxies at z~3 and z~4 which is supported by their photometric redshifts. The distributions of apparent magnitudes and the clustering properties of the two populations are analysed, and they show good agreement to earlier studies. We see no evolution in the comoving clustering scale length from z~3 to z~4. The techniques presented here will be applied to a much larger sample of U-dropouts from the whole survey in near future.
  • We present our image processing system for the reduction of optical imaging data from multi-chip cameras. In the framework of the Garching Bonn Deep Survey (GaBoDS; Schirmer et al. 2003) consisting of about 20 square degrees of high-quality data from WFI@MPG/ESO 2.2m, our group developed an imaging pipeline for the homogeneous and efficient processing of this large data set. Having weak gravitational lensing as the main science driver, our algorithms are optimised to produce deep co-added mosaics from individual exposures obtained from empty field observations. However, the modular design of our pipeline allows an easy adaption to different scientific applications. Our system has already been ported to a large variety of optical instruments and its products have been used in various scientific contexts. In this paper we give a thorough description of the algorithms used and a careful evaluation of the accuracies reached. This concerns the removal of the instrumental signature, the astrometric alignment, photometric calibration and the characterisation of final co-added mosaics. In addition we give a more general overview on the image reduction process and comment on observing strategies where they have significant influence on the data quality.
  • We present a measurement of mass estimates for dark matter halos around galaxies from the COMBO-17 survey using weak gravitational lensing. COMBO-17 is particularly useful for this kind of investigation because it covers observations in 17 optical filters from which accurate photometric redshifts and spectral classification for objects with $R<24$ are derived. This allows us to select lens and source galaxies from their redshifts and to thus avoid any uncertainties from estimates of the source redshift distribution. We study galaxy lenses at redshifts $z_\mathrm{d}=0.2-0.7$ by fitting the normalization of either singular isothermal spheres (SIS) or Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profiles to the whole lens sample; we then consider halos around blue and red subsamples separately. We also constrain the scaling of halo mass with light. For the NFW model, we find virial masses $M_\mathrm{vir}^*=3.9^{+3.3}_{-2.4}\times 10^{11}h^{-1}M_{\sun}$ (1-$\sigma$) for blue and $M_\mathrm{vir}^*=7.1^{+7.1}_{-3.8}\times 10^{11}h^{-1}M_{\sun}$ for red galaxies of $L_\star=10^{10}h^{-2}L_{\sun}$, respectively. The derived mass-to-light scaling relations suggest that the mass-to-light ratio might decrease with increasing luminosity for blue galaxies but increase with increasing luminosity for red galaxies. However, these differences between blue and red galaxies are only marginally significant and both subsamples are consistent with having the same mass-to-light ratio at all luminosities. Finally, we compare our results to those obtained from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Taking differences in the actual modelling into account, we find very good agreement with these surveys.
  • We investigate how galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements depend on the knowledge of redshifts for lens and source galaxies. Galaxy-galaxy lensing allows one to study dark matter halos of galaxies statistically using weak gravitational lensing. Redshift information is required to reliably distinguish foreground lens galaxies from background source galaxies and to convert the measured shear into constraints on the lens model. Without spectroscopy or multi-colour information, redshifts can be drawn from independently estimated probability distributions. The COMBO-17 survey provides redshifts for both lens and source galaxies. It thus offers the unique possibility to do this investigation with observational data. We find that it is of great importance to know the redshifts of individual lens galaxies in order to constrain the properties of their dark matter halos. Whether the redshifts are derived from $UBVRI$ or the larger number of filters available in COMBO-17 is not very important. In contrast, knowledge of individual source redshifts improves the measurements only very little over the use of statistical source redshift distributions as long as the source redshift distribution is known accurately.