• The ability to directly follow and time resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as {\pi}g) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with {\pi}g and {\pi}u symmetries, respectively, and where their ionisation probabilities do not maximise along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong back scattering contributions from low-Z atoms.
  • We report on the characterization of a superconducting nanowire detector for ions at low kinetic energies. We measure the absolute single particle detection efficiency $\eta$ and trace its increase with energy up to $\eta = 100$ %. We discuss the influence of noble gas adsorbates on the cryogenic surface and analyze their relevance for the detection of slow massive particles. We apply a recent model for the hot spot formation to the incidence of atomic ions at energies between 0.2-1 keV. We suggest how the differences observed for photons and atoms or molecules can be related to the surface condition of the detector and we propose that the restoration of proper surface conditions may open a new avenue to SSPD-based optical spectroscopy on molecules and nanoparticles.
  • We present a proof-of-principle study of superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) for the detection of individual neutral molecules/nanoparticles at low energies. The new detector is applied to characterize a laser desorption source for biomolecules and it allows to retrieve the arrival time distribution of a pulsed molecular beam containing the amino acid tryptophan, the polypeptide gramicidin as well as insulin, myoglobin and hemoglobin. We discuss the experimental evidence that the detector is actually sensitive to isolated neutral particles.
  • The generation of organic particle beams is studied in combination with photoionization using uv radiation at 266 nm and vuv light at 157 nm. Single-photon ionization with pulsed vuv light turns out to be sensitive enough to detect various large neutral biomolecular complexes ranging from metal-amino acid complexes to nucleotide clusters and aggregates of polypeptides. Different biomolecular clusters are shown to exhibit rather specific binding characteristics with regard to the various metals that are co-desorbed in the source. We also find that the ion signal of gramicidin can be increased by a factor of fifteen when the photon energy is increased from 4.66 eV to 7.9 eV.