• Abridged - We quantify the effect of the galaxy group environment (for 12.5 < log(M_group/Msun) < 14.0) on the star formation rates of the (morphologically-selected) population of disk-dominated local Universe spiral galaxies (z < 0.13) with stellar masses log(M*/Msun) > 9.5. Within this population, we find that, while a small minority of group satellites are strongly quenched, the group centrals, and the large majority of satellites exhibit levels of SFR indistinguishable from ungrouped "field" galaxies of the same M*, albeit with a higher scatter, and for all M*. Modelling these results, we deduce that disk-dominated satellites continue to be characterized by a rapid cycling of gas into and out of their ISM at rates similar to those operating prior to infall, with the on-going fuelling likely sourced from the group intrahalo medium (IHM) on Mpc scales, rather than from the circum-galactic medium on 100kpc scales. Consequently, the color-density relation of the galaxy population as a whole would appear to be primarily due to a change in the mix of disk- and spheroid-dominated morphologies in the denser group environment compared to the field, rather than to a reduced propensity of the IHM in higher mass structures to cool and accrete onto galaxies. We also suggest that the inferred substantial accretion of IHM gas by satellite disk-dominated galaxies will lead to a progressive reduction in their specific angular momentum, thereby representing an efficient secular mechanism to transform morphology from star-forming disk-dominated types to more passive spheroid-dominated types.
  • We present ground-based and Swift photometric and spectroscopic observations of the tidal disruption event (TDE) ASASSN-15oi, discovered at the center of 2MASX J20390918-3045201 ($d\simeq216$ Mpc) by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). The source peaked at a bolometric luminosity of $L\simeq1.3\times10^{44}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ and radiated a total energy of $E\simeq6.6\times10^{50}$ ergs over the first $\sim3.5$ months of observations. The early optical/UV emission of the source can be fit by a blackbody with temperature increasing from $T\sim2\times10^4$ K to $T\sim4\times10^4$ K while the luminosity declines from $L\simeq1.3\times10^{44}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ to $L\simeq2.3\times10^{43}$ ergs s$^{-1}$, requiring the photosphere to be shrinking rapidly. The optical/UV luminosity decline during this period is most consistent with an exponential decline, $L\propto e^{-(t-t_0)/\tau}$, with $\tau \simeq46.5$ days for $t_0\simeq57241.6$ (MJD), while a power-law decline of $L\propto (t-t_0)^{-\alpha}$ with $t_0\simeq57212.3$ and $\alpha=1.62$ provides a moderately worse fit. ASASSN-15oi also exhibits roughly constant soft X-ray emission that is significantly weaker than the optical/UV emission. Spectra of the source show broad helium emission lines and strong blue continuum emission in early epochs, although these features fade rapidly and are not present $\sim3$ months after discovery. The early spectroscopic features and color evolution of ASASSN-15oi are consistent with a TDE, but the rapid spectral evolution is unique among optically-selected TDEs.
  • We study the surface brightness profiles of disc galaxies in the 3.6 micron images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) and K_s-band images from the Near Infrared S0-Sa galaxy Survey (NIRS0S). We particularly connect properties of single exponential (type I), downbending double exponential (type II), and upbending double exponential (type III) disc profile types, to structural components of galaxies by using detailed morphological classifications, and size measurements of rings and lenses. We also study how the local environment of the galaxies affects the profile types by calculating parameters describing the environmental density and the tidal interaction strength. We find that in majority of type II profiles the break radius is connected with structural components such as rings, lenses, and spirals. The exponential disc sections of all three profile types, when considered separately, follow the disc scaling relations. However, the outer discs of type II, and the inner discs of type III, are similar in scalelength to the single exponential discs. Although the different profile types have similar mean environmental parameters, the scalelengths of the type III profiles show a positive correlation with the tidal interaction strength.
  • This paper is the second in a pair of articles presenting data release 1 (DR1) of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS), the largest single open-time key project carried out with the Herschel Space Observatory. The H-ATLAS is a wide-area imaging survey carried out in five photometric bands at 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500$\mu$m covering a total area of 600deg$^2$. In this paper we describe the identification of optical counterparts to submillimetre sources in DR1, comprising an area of 161 deg$^2$ over three equatorial fields of roughly 12$^\circ$x4.5$^\circ$ centred at 9$^h$, 12$^h$ and 14.5$^h$ respectively. Of all the H-ATLAS fields, the equatorial regions benefit from the greatest overlap with current multi-wavelength surveys spanning ultraviolet (UV) to mid-infrared regimes, as well as extensive spectroscopic coverage. We use a likelihood-ratio technique to identify SDSS counterparts at r<22.4 for 250-$\mu$m-selected sources detected at $\geq$ 4$\sigma$ ($\approx$28mJy). We find `reliable' counterparts (reliability R$\geq$0.8) for 44,835 sources (39 per cent), with an estimated completeness of 73.0 per cent and contamination rate of 4.7 per cent. Using redshifts and multi-wavelength photometry from GAMA and other public catalogues, we show that H-ATLAS-selected galaxies at $z<0.5$ span a wide range of optical colours, total infrared (IR) luminosities, and IR/UV ratios, with no strong disposition towards mid-IR-classified AGN in comparison with optical selection. The data described herein, together with all maps and catalogues described in the companion paper (Valiante et al. 2016), are available from the H-ATLAS website at www.h-atlas.org.
  • We combine Herschel/SPIRE sub-millimeter (submm) observations with existing multi-wavelength data to investigate the characteristics of low redshift, optically red galaxies detected in submm bands. We select a sample of galaxies in the redshift range 0.01$\leq$z$\leq$0.2, having >5$\sigma$ detections in the SPIRE 250 micron submm waveband. Sources are then divided into two sub-samples of $red$ and $blue$ galaxies, based on their UV-optical colours. Galaxies in the $red$ sample account for $\approx$4.2 per cent of the total number of sources with stellar masses M$_{*}\gtrsim$10$^{10}$ Solar-mass. Following visual classification of the $red$ galaxies, we find that $\gtrsim$30 per cent of them are early-type galaxies and $\gtrsim$40 per cent are spirals. The colour of the $red$-spiral galaxies could be the result of their highly inclined orientation and/or a strong contribution of the old stellar population. It is found that irrespective of their morphological types, $red$ and $blue$ sources occupy environments with more or less similar densities (i.e., the $\Sigma_5$ parameter). From the analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies in our samples based on MAGPHYS, we find that galaxies in the $red$ sample (of any morphological type) have dust masses similar to those in the $blue$ sample (i.e. normal spiral/star-forming systems). However, in comparison to the $red$-spirals and in particular $blue$ systems, $red$-ellipticals have lower mean dust-to-stellar mass ratios. Besides galaxies in the $red$-elliptical sample have much lower mean star-formation/specific-star-formation rates in contrast to their counterparts in the $blue$ sample. Our results support a scenario where dust in early-type systems is likely to be of an external origin.
  • Resonance rings are the consequence of secular evolution processes that redistribute material and angular momentum in discs. We produced a Catalogue and an Atlas of the rings detected in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) and to conduct a statistical study of the data in the Catalogue. We traced the contours of rings previously identified by Buta et al. (in preparation) and fitted them with ellipses. We found the orientation of bars by studying the galaxy ellipse fits from S4G's Pipeline 4. We used the galaxy orientation data obtained by S4G's Pipeline 4 to obtain intrinsic ellipticities and orientations of rings and the bars. ARRAKIS contains data on 724 ringed galaxies in the S4G. The frequency of resonance rings in the S4G is of 16+-1% and 35+-1% for outer and inner features, respectively. Outer rings are mostly found in Hubble stages -1<=T<=4. Inner rings are found in a distribution that covers the range -1<=T<=7. We confirm that outer rings have two preferred orientations, parallel and perpendicular to the bar. We confirm a tendency for inner rings to be oriented parallel to the bar, but we find that a significant fraction (~50%) of them have random orientations with respect to the bar. These misaligned inner rings are mostly found in late-type galaxies (T>=4). This may be due to spiral modes decoupled from the bar dominating the Fourier amplitude spectrum at the radius of the inner ring. We find that the fraction of barred galaxies hosting outer (inner) rings is ~1.7 times (~1.3 times) that in unbarred galaxies. The fact that rings are only mildly favoured by bars suggests that those in unbarred galaxies either formed due to weak departures from the axisymmetry of the galactic potential or that they are born because of bars that have been destroyed after the ring formation.
  • The mid-infrared is an optimal window to trace stellar mass in nearby galaxies and the 3.6$\mu m$ IRAC band has been exploited to this effect, but such mass estimates can be biased by dust emission. We present our pipeline to reveal the old stellar flux at 3.6$\mu m$ and obtain stellar mass maps for more than 1600 galaxies available from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S$^{4}$G). This survey consists of images in two infrared bands (3.6 and 4.5$\mu m$), and we use the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) method presented in Meidt et al. (2012) to separate the dominant light from old stars and the dust emission that can significantly contribute to the observed 3.6$\mu m$ flux. We exclude from our ICA analysis galaxies with low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N < 10) and those with original [3.6]-[4.5] colors compatible with an old stellar population, indicative of little dust emission (mostly early Hubble types, which can directly provide good mass maps). For the remaining 1251 galaxies to which ICA was successfully applied, we find that as much as 10-30% of the total light at 3.6$\mu m$ typically originates from dust, and locally it can reach even higher values. This contamination fraction shows a correlation with specific star formation rates, confirming that the dust emission that we detect is related to star formation. Additionally, we have used our large sample of mass estimates to calibrate a relationship of effective mass-to-light ratio ($M/L$) as a function of observed [3.6]-[4.5] color: $\log(M/L)=-0.339 (\pm 0.057) \times ([3.6]-[4.5]) -0.336 (\pm 0.002)$. Our final pipeline products have been made public through IRSA, providing the astronomical community with an unprecedentedly large set of stellar mass maps ready to use for scientific applications.
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low-redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ~286 deg^2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238,000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm - 1 m. Here we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component S\'ersic fits, stellar masses, H$\alpha$-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72,225 objects in total). The database serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
  • New mid-infrared period-luminosity (PL) relations are presented for \rrl{} variables in the globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121). Accurate photometry was obtained for 37 \rrl{} variables using observations from the Infrared Array Camera onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The dispersion of M4's PL relations is 0.056, and the uncertainty in the slope is 0.11 mag. Additionally, weestablished calibrated PL relations at 3.6 and 4.5~\micron{} using published Hubble Space Telescopegeometric parallaxes of five Galactic \rrl{} stars. The resulting band-averaged distance modulus for M4 is $ \mu = 11.399 \pm 0.007 \textrm{(stat)} \pm 0.080 \textrm{(syst)} \pm 0.015 \textrm{(cal)} \pm 0.020 \textrm{(ext)}$. The systematic uncertainty will be greatly reduced when parallaxes of more stars become available from the GAIA mission. Optical and infrared period-color (PC) relations are also presented, and the lack of a MIR PC relation suggests that \rrl{} stars are not affected by CO absorptionin the 4.5~\micron{} band.
  • The Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) is the largest available database of deep, homogeneous middle-infrared (mid-IR) images of galaxies of all types. The survey, which includes 2352 nearby galaxies, reveals galaxy morphology only minimally affected by interstellar extinction. This paper presents an atlas and classifications of S4G galaxies in the Comprehensive de Vaucouleurs revised Hubble-Sandage (CVRHS) system. The CVRHS system follows the precepts of classical de Vaucouleurs (1959) morphology, modified to include recognition of other features such as inner, outer, and nuclear lenses, nuclear rings, bars, and disks, spheroidal galaxies, X patterns and box/peanut structures, OLR subclass outer rings and pseudorings, bar ansae and barlenses, parallel sequence late-types, thick disks, and embedded disks in 3D early-type systems. We show that our CVRHS classifications are internally consistent, and that nearly half of the S4G sample consists of extreme late-type systems (mostly bulgeless, pure disk galaxies) in the range Scd-Im. The most common family classification for mid-IR types S0/a to Sc is SA while that for types Scd to Sm is SB. The bars in these two type domains are very different in mid-IR structure and morphology. This paper examines the bar, ring, and type classification fractions in the sample, and also includes several montages of images highlighting the various kinds of "stellar structures" seen in mid-IR galaxy morphology.
  • We combine data from the Spitzer Survey for Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S$^4$G), a recently calibrated empirical stellar mass estimator from Eskew et al., and an extensive database of HI spectral line profiles to examine the baryonic Tully-Fisher (BTF) relation. We find 1) that the BTF has lower scatter than the classic Tully-Fisher (TF) relation and is better described as a linear relationship, confirming similar previous results, 2) that the inclusion of a radial scale in the BTF decreases the scatter but only modestly, as seen previously for the TF relation, and 3) that the slope of the BTF, which we find to be $3.5\pm 0.2$ ($\Delta$ log $M_{baryon}/\Delta$ log $v_c$), implies that on average a nearly constant fraction ($\sim 0.4$) of all baryons expected to be in a halo are "condensed" onto the central region of rotationally supported galaxies. The condensed baryon fraction, $M_{baryon}/M_{total}$, is, to our measurement precision, nearly independent of galaxy circular velocity (our sample spans circular velocities, $v_c$, between 60 and 250 km s$^{-1}$, but is extended to $v_c\sim 10$ km s$^{-1}$ using data from the literature). The observed galaxy-to-galaxy scatter in this fraction is generally $\le$ a factor of 2 despite fairly liberal selection criteria. These results imply that cooling and heating processes, such as cold vs. hot accretion, mass loss due to stellar winds, and AGN driven feedback, to the degree that they affect the global galactic properties involved in the BTF, are independent of halo mass for galaxies with $10 < v_c < 250$ km/s and typically introduce no more than a factor of two range in the resulting $M_{baryon}/M_{total}$. Recent simulations by Aumer et al. of a small sample of disk galaxies are in excellent agreement with our data, suggesting that current simulations are capable of reproducing the global properties of individual disk galaxies.
  • We present a new approach for estimating the 3.6 micron stellar mass-to-light ratio in terms of the [3.6]-[4.5] colors of old stellar populations. Our approach avoids several of the largest sources of uncertainty in existing techniques. By focusing on mid-IR wavelengths, we gain a virtually dust extinction-free tracer of the old stars, avoiding the need to adopt a dust model to correctly interpret optical or optical/NIR colors normally leveraged to assign M/L. By calibrating a new relation between NIR and mid-IR colors of GLIMPSE giant stars we also avoid discrepancies in model predictions for the [3.6]-[4.5] colors of old stellar populations due to uncertainties in molecular line opacities. We find that the [3.6]-[4.5] color, which is driven primarily by metallicity, provides a tight constraint on M/L_3.6, which varies intrinsically less than at optical wavelengths. The uncertainty on M/L_3.6 of ~0.07 dex due to unconstrained age variations marks a significant improvement on existing techniques for estimating the stellar M/L with shorter wavelength data. A single M/L_3.6=0.6 (assuming a Chabrier IMF), independent of [3.6]-[4.5] color, is also feasible as it can be applied simultaneously to old, metal-rich and young, metal-poor populations, and still with comparable (or better) accuracy (~0.1 dex) as alternatives. We expect our M/L_3.6 to be optimal for mapping the stellar mass distributions in S4G galaxies, for which we have developed an Independent Component Analysis technique to first isolate the old stellar light at 3.6 micron from non-stellar emission (e.g. hot dust and the 3.3 PAH feature). Our estimate can also be used to determine the fractional contribution of non-stellar emission to global (rest-frame) 3.6 micron fluxes, e.g. in WISE imaging, and establishes a reliable basis for exploring variations in the stellar IMF.
  • (Abridged) We present a non-parametric cell-based method of selecting highly pure and largely complete samples of spiral galaxies using photometric and structural parameters as provided by standard photometric pipelines and simple shape fitting algorithms, demonstrably superior to commonly used proxies. Furthermore, we find structural parameters derived using passbands longwards of the $g$ band and linked to older stellar populations, especially the stellar mass surface density $\mu_*$ and the $r$ band effective radius $r_e$, to perform at least equally well as parameters more traditionally linked to the identification of spirals by means of their young stellar populations. In particular the distinct bimodality in the parameter $\mu_*$, consistent with expectations of different evolutionary paths for spirals and ellipticals, represents an often overlooked yet powerful parameter in differentiating between spiral and non-spiral/elliptical galaxies. We investigate the intrinsic specific star-formation rate - stellar mass relation ($\psi_* - M_*$) for a morphologically defined volume limited sample of local universe spiral galaxies, defined using the cell-based method with an appropriate parameter combination. The relation is found to be well described by $\psi_* \propto M_*^{-0.5}$ over the range of $10^{9.5} M_{\odot} \le M_* \le 10^{11} M_{\odot}$ with a mean interquartile range of $0.4\,$dex. This is somewhat steeper than previous determinations based on colour-selected samples of star-forming galaxies, primarily due to the inclusion in the sample of red quiescent disks.
  • The morphology of galaxies can be quantified to some degree using a set of scale-invariant parameters. Concentration (C), Asymmetry (A), Smoothness (S), the Gini index (G), relative contribution of the brightest pixels to the second order moment of the flux (M20), ellipticity (E), and the Gini index of the second order moment (GM) have all been applied to morphologically classify galaxies at various wavelengths. Here we present a catalog of these parameters for the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G), a volume-limited near-infrared imaging survey of nearby galaxies using the 3.6 and 4.5 micron channels of the IRAC camera. Our goal is to provide a reference catalog of near-infrared quantified morphology for high-redshift studies and galaxy evolution models with enough detail to resolve stellar mass morphology. We explore where normal, non-interacting galaxies -those typically found on the Hubble tuning fork- lie in this parameter space and show that there is a tight relation between Concentration and M20 for normal galaxies. M20 can be used to classify galaxies into earlier and later types (e.g., to separate spirals from irregulars). Several criteria using these parameters exist to select systems with a disturbed morphology, i.e., those that appear to be undergoing a tidal interaction. We examine the applicability of these criteria to Spitzer near-infrared imaging. We find that four relations, based on the parameters A&S, G&M20, GM, and C&M20, respectively, select outliers in the morphological parameter space, but each selects different subsets of galaxies. Two criteria (GM > 0.6, G > -0.115 x M20 + 0.384) seem most appropriate to identify possible mergers and the merger fraction in near-infrared surveys. We find no strong relation between lopsidedness and most of these morphological parameters, except for a weak dependence of lopsidedness on Concentration and M20.
  • We present two large, nearby (0.013$\le$z$\le$0.06) samples of Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs): a visually classified sample of 220 ETGs, created using source-matched data from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) database with FIR/sub-mm detections from $Herschel$-ATLAS; and a visually classified sample of 551 ETGs which are undetected with $Herschel$-ATLAS. Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are removed from our samples using optical emission line diagnostics. These samples are scrutinised to determine characteristics of sub-mm detected versus undetected ETGs. We find similarities in the stellar mass distributions of the two ETG samples but testing other properties uncovers significant differences. The sub-mm detected sample is shown to have lower concentration and S\'ersic indices than those in the undetected sample - a result which may be linked to the presence of dust in the former. Optical and UV-optical colours are also shown to be much bluer, indicating that the dust is linked with recent star formation. The intrinsic effective radii are on average 1.5 times larger for the sub-mm detected ETGs. Surface densities and groups data from the GAMA database are examined for the two samples, leading to the conclusion that dusty ETGs inhabit sparser environments than non-dusty ETGs in the nearby universe, although environments of the brightest ETGs are shown to differ the least. Modified Planck functions are fit to the H-ATLAS detected PACS and SPIRE fluxes for ETGs with sub-mm flux densities of at least 3$\sigma$ in the 350$\mu$m SPIRE band, giving a resultant mean cold dust temperature of T$_{d}$=22.1K, with a range of 9-30K. The corresponding mean dust mass is 1.8$\times10^{7}$M$_{\odot}$, with a range of (0.08-35.0)$\times10^{7}$M$_{\odot}$. The dust masses calculated from these fits, normalised by stellar mass, are shown to increase with decreasing stellar mass and bluer colours.
  • We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, \tau^f_B, and the stellar mass surface density, \mu_{*}, of nearby (z < 0.13) spiral galaxies: log(\tau^f_B) = 1.12(+-0.11)log(\mu_{*}/M_sol kpc^2)-8.6(+-0.8). This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey and detected in the FIR/submm in the Herschel-ATLAS survey. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to \mu_{*} we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and S'ersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships between stellar mass, metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the \tau^f_B-\mu_{*} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the ISM. We use the \tau^f_B-\mu_{*} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu & Tuffs (2011) to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (sSFR), stellar mass, and \mu_{*}, in which the attenuation of the UV light used to measure the SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which is demonstrably due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar radiation field.
  • We present the selection and classification of over a thousand ultraviolet (UV) variable sources discovered in ~ 40 deg^2 of GALEX Time Domain Survey (TDS) NUV images observed with a cadence of 2 days and a baseline of observations of ~ 3 years. The GALEX TDS fields were designed to be in spatial and temporal coordination with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, which provides deep optical imaging and simultaneous optical transient detections via image differencing. We characterize the GALEX photometric errors empirically as a function of mean magnitude, and select sources that vary at the 5\sigma level in at least one epoch. We measure the statistical properties of the UV variability, including the structure function on timescales of days and years. We report classifications for the GALEX TDS sample using a combination of optical host colors and morphology, UV light curve characteristics, and matches to archival X-ray, and spectroscopy catalogs. We classify 62% of the sources as active galaxies (358 quasars and 305 active galactic nuclei), and 10% as variable stars (including 37 RR Lyrae, 53 M dwarf flare stars, and 2 cataclysmic variables). The remaining unclassified sources include UV-bright extragalactic transients, two of which have been spectroscopically confirmed to be a young core-collapse supernova and a flare from the tidal disruption of a star by dormant supermassive black hole. We calculate a surface density for variable sources in the UV with NUV < 23 mag and |\Delta m| > 0.2 mag of ~ 8.0, 7.7, and 1.8 deg^-2 for quasars, AGNs, and RR Lyrae stars, respectively. We also calculate a surface density rate in the UV for transient sources, using the effective survey time at the cadence appropriate to each class, of ~ 15 and 52 deg^-2 yr^-1 for M dwarfs and extragalactic transients, respectively. (Abridged.)
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at mid-infrared wavelengths 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22 microns. The mission was primarily designed to extract point sources, leaving resolved and extended sources unexplored. We have begun a dedicated WISE Enhanced Resolution Galaxy Atlas (WERGA) project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalogue. Here we demonstrate the first results of the project for a sample of 17 galaxies, chosen to be of large angular size, diverse morphology, color, stellar mass and star formation. It includes many well-studied galaxies, such as M51, M81, M83, M87, M101, IC342. Photometry and surface brightness decomposition is carried out after special super-resolution processing, achieving spatial fidelity similar to that of Spitzer-IRAC. We present WISE, Spitzer and GALEX photometric and characterization measurements, combining the measurements to study the global properties. We derive star formation rates using the PAH-sensitive 12 micron (W3) fluxes, warm-dust sensitive 22 micron (W4) fluxes, and young massive-star sensitive UV fluxes. Stellar masses are estimated using the 3.4 micron (W1) and 4.6 micron (W2) measurements that trace the dominant stellar mass content. We highlight and showcase the detailed results of M83, comparing the infrared results with the ATCA HI gas distribution and GALEX UV emission, tracing the evolution from gas to stars. In addition to the enhanced images, WISE all-sky coverage provides a tremendous advantage over Spitzer for building a complete nearby galaxy catalog, tracing both stellar mass and star formation histories. We discuss the construction of a complete mid-infrared catalog of galaxies and its complementary role to study the assembly and evolution of galaxies in the local universe.
  • We use the GAMA I dataset combined with GALEX, SDSS and UKIDSS imaging to construct the low-redshift (z<0.1) galaxy luminosity functions in FUV, NUV, ugriz, and YJHK bands from within a single well constrained volume of 3.4 x 10^5 (Mpc/h)^{3}. The derived luminosity distributions are normalised to the SDSS DR7 main survey to reduce the estimated cosmic variance to the 5 per cent level. The data are used to construct the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) from 0.1 to 2.1 \mum free from any wavelength dependent cosmic variance for both the elliptical and non-elliptical populations. The two populations exhibit dramatically different CSEDs as expected for a predominantly old and young population respectively. Using the Driver et al. (2008) prescription for the azimuthally averaged photon escape fraction, the non-ellipticals are corrected for the impact of dust attenuation and the combined CSED constructed. The final results show that the Universe is currently generating (1.8 +/- 0.3) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} of which (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} is directly released into the inter-galactic medium and (0.6 +/- 0.1) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} is reprocessed and reradiated by dust in the far-IR. Using the GAMA data and our dust model we predict the mid and far-IR emission which agrees remarkably well with available data. We therefore provide a robust description of the pre- and post dust attenuated energy output of the nearby Universe from 0.1micron to 0.6mm. The largest uncertainty in this measurement lies in the mid and far-IR bands stemming from the dust attenuation correction and its currently poorly constrained dependence on environment, stellar mass, and morphology.
  • We present a pan-chromatic analysis of an unprecedented sample of 1402 250 micron-selected galaxies at z < 0.5 (mean z = 0.24) from the Herschel-ATLAS survey. We complement our Herschel 100-500 micron data with UV-K-band photometry from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey and apply the MAGPHYS energy-balance technique to produce pan-chromatic SEDs for a representative sample of 250 micron selected galaxies spanning the most recent 5 Gyr of cosmic history. We derive estimates of physical parameters, including star formation rates, stellar masses, dust masses and infrared luminosities. The typical H-ATLAS galaxy at z < 0.5 has a far-infrared luminosity in the range 10^10 - 10^12 Lsolar (SFR: 1-50 Msolar/yr) thus is broadly representative of normal star forming galaxies over this redshift range. We show that 250 micron-selected galaxies contain a larger mass of dust at a given infra-red luminosity or star formation rate than previous samples selected at 60 micron from IRAS. We derive typical SEDs for H-ATLAS galaxies, and show that the emergent SED shape is most sensitive to specific star formation rate. The optical-UV SEDs also become more reddened due to dust at higher redshifts. Our template SEDs are significantly cooler than existing infra-red templates. They may therefore be most appropriate for inferring total IR luminosities from moderate redshift submillimetre selected samples and for inclusion in models of the lower redshift submillimetre galaxy populations.
  • After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 {\mu}m, 4.6 {\mu}m, 12 {\mu}m and 22 {\mu}m. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas (WHRGA) project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalogue. Here we summarize the deconvolution technique used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE super-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, GALEX and ground-based imaging. The is the first paper in a two part series; results for a much larger sample of nearby galaxies is presented in the second paper.
  • We use the Herschel-ATLAS survey to conduct the first large-scale statistical study of the submm properties of optically selected galaxies. Using ~80,000 r-band selected galaxies from 126 deg^2 of the GAMA survey, we stack into submm imaging at 250, 350 and 500{\mu}m to gain unprecedented statistics on the dust emission from galaxies at z < 0.35. We find that low redshift galaxies account for 5% of the cosmic 250{\mu}m background (4% at 350{\mu}m; 3% at 500{\mu}m), of which approximately 60% comes from 'blue' and 20% from 'red' galaxies (rest-frame g - r). We compare the dust properties of different galaxy populations by dividing the sample into bins of optical luminosity, stellar mass, colour and redshift. In blue galaxies we find that dust temperature and luminosity correlate strongly with stellar mass at a fixed redshift, but red galaxies do not follow these correlations and overall have lower luminosities and temperatures. We make reasonable assumptions to account for the contaminating flux from lensing by red sequence galaxies and conclude that galaxies with different optical colours have fundamentally different dust emission properties. Results indicate that while blue galaxies are more luminous than red galaxies due to higher temperatures, the dust masses of the two samples are relatively similar. Dust mass is shown to correlate with stellar mass, although the dust/stellar mass ratio is much higher for low stellar mass galaxies, consistent with the lowest mass galaxies having the highest specific star formation rates. We stack the 250{\mu}m/NUV luminosity ratio, finding results consistent with greater obscuration of star formation at lower stellar mass and higher redshift. Submm luminosities and dust masses of all galaxies are shown to evolve strongly with redshift, indicating a fall in the amount of obscured star formation in ordinary galaxies over the last four billion years.
  • We present the dust properties and star-formation histories of local submillimetre-selected galaxies in Herschel-ATLAS, classified by optical morphology. The early-type galaxies (ETGs) that are detected contain as much dust as typical spirals, and form a unique sample that has been blindly selected at submillimetre wavelengths. Comparing H-ATLAS galaxies to a control sample of optically selected galaxies, we find 5.5% of luminous ETGs are detected in H-ATLAS. The H-ATLAS ETGs contain a significant mass of cold dust: the mean dust mass is 5.5x10^7 Msun, with individual galaxies ranging from 9x10^5-4x10^8 Msun. This is comparable to that of spirals in our sample, and is an order of magnitude more dust than that found for the control ETGs, which have a median dust mass inferred from stacking of (0.8-4.0)x10^6 Msun. The ETGs detected in H-ATLAS have bluer NUV-r colours, higher specific star-formation rates and younger stellar populations than ETGs which are optically selected, and may be transitioning from the blue cloud to the red sequence. We also find that H-ATLAS and control ETGs inhabit similar low-density environments. We conclude that the dust in H-ATLAS and control ETGs cannot be solely from stellar sources, and a large contribution from dust formed in the ISM or external sources is required. Alternatively, dust destruction may not be as efficient as predicted. We also explore the properties of the most passive spiral galaxies in our sample with SSFR<10^-11/yr. We find these passive spirals have lower dust-to-stellar mass ratios, higher stellar masses and older stellar population ages than normal spirals. The passive spirals inhabit low density environments similar to those of the normal spiral galaxies in our sample. This shows that the processes which turn spirals passive do not occur solely in the intermediate density environments of group and cluster outskirts. (Abridged)
  • We present a technique to identify optical counterparts of 250 um-selected sources from the Herschel-ATLAS survey. Of the 6621 250 um > 32 mJy sources in our science demonstration catalogue we find that ~60 percent have counterparts brighter than r=22.4 mag in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Applying a likelihood ratio technique we are able to identify 2423 of the counterparts with a reliability R > 0.8. This is approximately 37 percent of the full 250 micron catalogue. We have estimated photometric redshifts for each of these 2423 reliable counterparts, while 1099 also have spectroscopic redshifts collated from several different sources, including the GAMA survey. We estimate the completeness of identifying counterparts as a function of redshift, and present evidence that 250 um-selected Herschel-ATLAS galaxies have a bimodal redshift distribution. Those with reliable optical identifications have a redshift distribution peaking at z ~ 0.25 +/- 0.05, while sub-mm colours suggest that a significant fraction with no counterpart above the r-band limit have z > 1. We also suggest a method for selecting populations of strongly-lensed high redshift galaxies. Our identifications are matched to UV--NIR photometry from the GAMA survey, and these data are available as part of the Herschel-ATLAS public data release.
  • We investigate the ultraviolet and optical properties and environment of low redshift galaxies detected in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) science demonstration data. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey seventh release and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly database to select galaxies with r_Petro < 19.0 mag in the redshift range 0.02 < z < 0.2 and look for their submillimeter counterparts in H-ATLAS. Our results show that at low redshift, H-ATLAS detects mainly blue/star-forming galaxies with a minor contribution from red systems which are highly obscured by dust. In addition we find that the colour of a galaxy rather than the local density of its environment determines whether it is detectable by H-ATLAS. The average dust temperature of galaxies that are simultaneously detected by both PACS and SPIRE is 25K \pm 4K, independent of environment. This analysis provides a glimpse of the potential of the H-ATLAS data to investigate the submillimeter properties of galaxies in the local universe.