• This report reviews the study of open heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in high-energy hadronic collisions, as tools to investigate fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, from the proton and nucleus structure at high energy to deconfinement and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Emphasis is given to the lessons learnt from LHC Run 1 results, which are reviewed in a global picture with the results from SPS and RHIC at lower energies, as well as to the questions to be addressed in the future. The report covers heavy flavour and quarkonium production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes discussion of the effects of hot and cold strongly interacting matter, quarkonium photo-production in nucleus-nucleus collisions and perspectives on the study of heavy flavour and quarkonium with upgrades of existing experiments and new experiments. The report results from the activity of the SaporeGravis network of the I3 Hadron Physics programme of the European Union 7th Framework Programme.
  • We analyze different stages of magnetized quark star evolution incorporating baryon number conservation and using an anisotropic energy momentum tensor. The first stages of the evolution are simulated through the inclusion of trapped neutrinos and fixed entropy per particle, while in the last stage the star is taken to be deleptonized and cold. We find that, although strong magnetic fields modify quark star masses, the evolution of isolated stars needs to be constrained by fixed baryon number, which necessarily lowers the possible star masses. Moreover, magnetic field effects, measured by the difference between the parallel and perpendicular pressures, are more pronounced in the beginning of the star evolution, when there is a larger number of charged leptons and up quarks. We also show that having a spatially varying magnetic field allows for larger magnetic fields to be supported.
  • It is well known that in noncentral heavy-ion collisions a transient strong magnetic field is generated in the direction perpendicular to the reaction plane. The maximal strength of this field is estimated to be $eB \sim m^2_{\pi} \sim 0.02 \text{GeV}^2$ at the RHIC and $eB \sim 15 m^2_{\pi} \sim 0.3 \text{GeV}^2$ at the LHC. We investigate the effects of a strong magnetic field on $B$ and $D$ mesons, focusing on the changes of the energy levels and the masses of the bound states. Using the Color Evaporation Model we discuss the possible changes in the production of $J/\psi$ and $\Upsilon$.
  • The recently formulated framework of anisotropic hydrodynamics is used in 3+1 dimensions to study behavior of matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The model predictions for various hadronic observables show that the effects of the initial anisotropy of pressure may be compensated by appropriate adjustment of the initial energy density. In this way, the final hadronic observables become insensitive to the early stage dynamics and the early thermalization/isotropization puzzle may be circumvented.
  • There has been significant progress in our understanding of finite-temperature field theory over the past decade. In this paper, we review the progress in perturbative thermal field theory focusing on thermodynamic quantities. We first discuss the breakdown of naive perturbation theory at finite temperature and the need for an effective expansion that resums an infinite class of diagrams in the perturbative expansion. This effective expansion which is due to Braaten and Pisarski, can be used to systematically calculate various static and dynamical quantities as a weak-coupling expansion in powers of g. However, it turns that the weak-coupling expansion for thermodynamic quantities are useless unless the coupling constant is very small. We critically discuss various ways of reorganizing the perturbative series for thermal field theories in order to improve its convergence. These include screened perturbation theory (SPT), hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory (HTLPT), the Phi-derivable approach, dimensionally reduced (DR) SPT, and the DR Phi-derivable approach.