• We identify seven new ultracool white dwarfs discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The SDSS photometry, spectra, and proper motions are presented, and additional BVRI data are given for these and other previously discovered ultracool white dwarfs. The observed colors span a remarkably wide range, qualitatively similar to colors predicted by models for very cool white dwarfs. One of the new stars (SDSS J1251+44) exhibits strong collision-induced absorption (CIA) in its spectra, while the spectra and colors of the other six are consistent with mild CIA. Another of the new discoveries (SDSS J2239+00A) is part of a binary system -- its companion is also a cool white dwarf, and other data indicate that the companion exhibits an infrared flux deficiency, making this the first binary system composed of two CIA white dwarfs. A third discovery (SDSS J0310-00) has weak Balmer emission lines. The proper motions of all seven stars are consistent with membership in the disk or thick disk.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 sq. deg. region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.
  • We describe the results of a search for galaxies with large (> 350 km/s) velocity dispersions. The largest systems we have found appear to be the extremes of the early-type galaxy population: compared to other galaxies with similar luminosities, they have the largest velocity dispersions and the smallest sizes. However, they are not distant outliers from the Fundamental Plane and mass-to-light scaling relations defined by the bulk of the early-type galaxy population. They may host the most massive black holes in the Universe, and their abundance and properties can be used to constrain galaxy formation models. Clear outliers from the scaling relations tend to be objects in superposition (angular separations smaller than 1 arcsec), evidence for which comes sometimes from the spectra, sometimes from the images, and sometimes from both. The statistical properties of the superposed pairs, e.g., the distribution of pair separations and velocity dispersions, can be used to provide useful information about the expected distribution of image multiplicities, separations and flux ratios due to gravitational lensing by multiple lenses, and may also constrain models of their interaction rates.
  • We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M_i = -22 (in a cosmology with H_0 = 70 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, and Omega_Lambda = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km/s or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 4188 sq. deg. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2 arcsec. rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800--9200A at a spectral resolution about 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.
  • We present the large-scale correlation function measured from a spectroscopic sample of 46,748 luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The survey region covers 0.72 h^{-3} Gpc^3 over 3816 square degrees and 0.16<z<0.47, making it the best sample yet for the study of large-scale structure. We find a well-detected peak in the correlation function at 100h^{-1} Mpc separation that is an excellent match to the predicted shape and location of the imprint of the recombination-epoch acoustic oscillations on the low-redshift clustering of matter. This detection demonstrates the linear growth of structure by gravitational instability between z=1000 and the present and confirms a firm prediction of the standard cosmological theory. The acoustic peak provides a standard ruler by which we can measure the ratio of the distances to z=0.35 and z=1089 to 4% fractional accuracy and the absolute distance to z=0.35 to 5% accuracy. From the overall shape of the correlation function, we measure the matter density Omega_mh^2 to 8% and find agreement with the value from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. Independent of the constraints provided by the CMB acoustic scale, we find Omega_m = 0.273 +- 0.025 + 0.123 (1+w_0) + 0.137 Omega_K. Including the CMB acoustic scale, we find that the spatial curvature is Omega_K=-0.010+-0.009 if the dark energy is a cosmological constant. More generally, our results provide a measurement of cosmological distance, and hence an argument for dark energy, based on a geometric method with the same simple physics as the microwave background anisotropies. The standard cosmological model convincingly passes these new and robust tests of its fundamental properties.
  • We study 16,707 quasar spectra from the SDSS using the Karhunen-Lo\`eve (KL) transform (or Principal Component Analysis, PCA). The quasar eigenspectra of the full catalog reveal the following: 1st order - the mean spectrum; 2nd order - a host-galaxy component; 3rd order - the UV-optical continuum slope; 4th order - the correlations of Balmer emission lines. We find that the spectral classification of quasars is redshift and luminosity dependent, as such there does not exist a compact set (< 10 modes) of eigenspectra (covering 900 to 8000 angstrom) which can describe most variations (> 95%) of the entire catalog. We therefore construct several sets of eigenspectra in different redshift and luminosity bins. From these eigenspectra we find that quasar spectra can be classified (by the first two eigenspectra) into a sequence that is defined by a simple progression in the steepness of the slope of the continuum. We also find a dependence on redshift and luminosity in the eigencoefficients. The dominant redshift effect is a result of the evolution of the blended FeII emission (optical) and the Balmer continuum (the ``small bump''). A luminosity dependence is also present in the eigencoefficients and is related to the Baldwin effect. The eigenspectra constructed from the wavelength-selected SDSS spectra are found to agree with the principal components by Francis et al. (1992) and the well-known ``Eigenvector-1'' (Boroson and Green 1992). (Abridged)
  • The distribution of early-type galaxy velocity dispersions, phi(sigma), is measured using a sample drawn from the SDSS database. Its shape differs significantly from that which one obtains by simply using the mean correlation between luminosity, L, and velocity dispersion, sigma, to transform the luminosity function into a velocity function: ignoring the scatter around the mean sigma-L relation is a bad approximation. An estimate of the contribution from late-type galaxies is also made, which suggests that phi(sigma) is dominated by early-type galaxies at velocities larger than ~ 200 km/s.
  • An initial assessment is made of white dwarf and hot subdwarf stars observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In a small area of sky (190 square degrees), observed much like the full survey will be, 269 white dwarfs and 56 hot subdwarfs are identified spectroscopically where only 44 white dwarfs and 5 hot subdwarfs were known previously. Most are ordinary DA (hydrogen atmosphere) and DB (helium) types. In addition, in the full survey to date, a number of WDs have been found with uncommon spectral types. Among these are blue DQ stars displaying lines of atomic carbon; red DQ stars showing molecular bands of C_2 with a wide variety of strengths; DZ stars where Ca and occasionally Mg, Na, and/or Fe lines are detected; and magnetic WDs with a wide range of magnetic field strengths in DA, DB, DQ, and (probably) DZ spectral types. Photometry alone allows identification of stars hotter than 12000 K, and the density of these stars for 15<g<20 is found to be ~2.2 deg^{-2} at Galactic latitudes 29-62 deg. Spectra are obtained for roughly half of these hot stars. The spectra show that, for 15<g<17, 40% of hot stars are WDs and the fraction of WDs rises to ~90% at g=20. The remainder are hot sdB and sdO stars.
  • A magnitude limited sample of nearly 9000 early-type galaxies, in the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.3, was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using morphological and spectral criteria. The sample was used to study how early-type galaxy observables, including luminosity L, effective radius R_o, surface brightness I_o, color, and velocity dispersion sigma, are correlated with one another. Measurement biases are understood with mock catalogs which reproduce all of the observed scaling relations and their dependences on fitting technique. At any given redshift, the intrinsic distribution of luminosities, sizes and velocity dispersions in our sample are all approximately Gaussian. A maximum likelihood analysis shows that sigma ~ L^{0.25\pm 0.012}, R_o ~ L^{0.63\pm 0.025}, and R_o ~ I^{-0.75\pm 0.02} in the r* band. In addition, the mass-to-light ratio within the effective radius scales as M_o/L ~ L^{0.14\pm 0.02} or M_o/L ~ M_o^{0.22\pm 0.05}, and galaxies with larger effective masses have smaller effective densities: Delta_o ~ M_o^{-0.52\pm 0.03}. These relations are approximately the same in the g*, i* and z* bands. Relative to the population at the median redshift in the sample, galaxies at lower and higher redshifts have evolved only little, with more evolution in the bluer bands. The luminosity function is consistent with weak passive luminosity evolution and a formation time of about 9 Gyrs ago.
  • A magnitude limited sample of nearly 9000 early-type galaxies, in the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.3, was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using morphological and spectral criteria. The Fundamental Plane relation in this sample is R_o ~ sigma^{1.49\pm 0.05} I_o^{-0.75\pm 0.01} in the r* band. It is approximately the same in the g*, i* and z* bands. Relative to the population at the median redshift in the sample, galaxies at lower and higher redshifts have evolved only little. If the Fundamental Plane is used to quantify this evolution then the apparent magnitude limit can masquerade as evolution; once this selection effect has been accounted for, the evolution is consistent with that of a passively evolving population which formed the bulk of its stars about 9 Gyrs ago. One of the principal advangtages of the SDSS sample over previous samples is that the galaxies in it lie in environments ranging from isolation in the field to the dense cores of clusters. The Fundamental Plane shows that galaxies in dense regions are slightly different from galaxies in less dense regions.
  • The colors and chemical abundances of early-type galaxies at redshifts z<0.3 are studied using a sample of nearly 9000 galaxies, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using morphological and spectral criteria. In this sample, redder galaxies have larger velocity dispersions. Color also correlates with magnitude and size, but these correlations are entirely due to the L-sigma and R_o-sigma relations: the primary correlation is color-sigma. The red light in early-type galaxies is, on average, slightly more centrally concentrated than the blue. Because of these color gradients, the strength of the color--magnitude relation depends on whether or not the colors are defined using a fixed metric aperture. Chemical evolution and star formation histories of early-type galaxies are investigated using co-added spectra of similar objects. At fixed sigma, the population at z ~ 0.2 had weaker Mg_2 and stronger H_beta absorption compared to the population at z ~ 0. It was also bluer. Comparison of these colors and line-strengths, and their evolution, with single-burst stellar population models suggests a formation time of 9 Gyrs ago, consistent with a Fundamental Plane analysis of this sample.
  • A sample of nearly 9000 early-type galaxies, in the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.3, was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using morphological and spectral criteria. This paper describes how the sample was selected, presents examples of images and seeing corrected fits to the observed surface brightness profiles, describes our method for estimating K-corrections, and shows that the SDSS spectra are of sufficiently high quality to measure velocity dispersions accurately. It also provides catalogs of the measured photometric and spectroscopic parameters. In related papers, these data are used to study how early-type galaxy observables, including luminosity, effective radius, surface brightness, color, and velocity dispersion, are correlated with one another.
  • The effective optical depth in the Ly-alpha forest region of 1061 low-resolution QSO spectra drawn from the SDSS database decreases with decreasing redshift over the range 2.5 < z < 4. Although the evolution is relatively smooth, tau_eff ~ (1+z)^{3.8 pm 0.2}, at z ~ 3.2 the effective optical depth decreases suddenly, by about ten percent with respect to this smoother evolution. It climbs back to the original smooth scaling again by z ~ 2.9. We describe two techniques, one of which is new, for quantifying this evolution which give consistent results. A variety of tests show that the feature is not likely to be a consequence of how the QSO sample was selected, nor the result of flux calibration or other systematic effects. Other authors have argued that, at this same epoch, the temperature of the IGM also shows a departure from an otherwise smooth decrease with time. These features in the evolution of the temperature and the optical depth are signatures of the reionization of He II.
  • The expansion of the Universe leads to a rapid drop in the mean hydrogen Ly-alpha opacity tau of the intergalactic medium (IGM), tau (1+z)^{3.8}, between redshifts 4 and 3. Measurements of the temperature evolution of the IGM and of the He II opacity both suggest that He II reionizes in this redshift range. We use hydrodynamical simulations to show that the temperature increase associated with He II reionization leads to a relatively sudden decrease in tau around the reionization epoch of ~ 10 per cent. We find clear evidence for such a feature in the evolution of tau determined from a sample of ~ 1100 quasars obtained from the SDSS. He II reionization starts at redshift ~ 3.4, and lasts for (Delta z) ~ 0.4. The increase in the IGM temperature also explains the widths of hydrogen absorption lines as measured in high-resolution spectra.
  • A sample of nearly 9000 early-type galaxies, in the redshift range 0.01<z<0.3, was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using morphological and spectral criteria. The sample was used to study how early-type galaxy observables, including luminosity L, effective radius R, surface brightness I, color, and velocity dispersion V, are correlated with one another. Measurement biases are understood with mock catalogs which reproduce all of the observed scaling relations. At any given redshift, the intrinsic distribution of luminosities, sizes and velocity dispersions in our sample are all approximately Gaussian. In the r* band L ~ V^3.91, L ~ R^1.58, R ~ I^(-0.75), and the Fundamental Plane relation is R ~ V^(1.49) I^(-0.75). These relations are approximately the same in the g*, i* and z* bands. At fixed luminosity, the mass-to-light ratio scales as M/L ~ L^0.14. The g*-r* color scales as V^0.25. Color also correlates with magnitude and size, but these correlations are entirely due to the L-V and R-V relations. Chemical evolution and star formation histories are investigated using co-added spectra of similar objects in our sample. Chemical abundances correlate primarily with velocity dispersion. At fixed V, the higher redshift population is bluer, is weaker in Mg2, and is stronger in Hbeta than the population nearby. In addition, the population at higher redshifts is slightly more luminous. These differences are consistent with that of a passively evolving population which formed the bulk of its stars about 9 Gyrs ago. The Fundamental Plane suggests that galaxies in dense regions are slightly different from those in less dense regions, but the co-added spectra and color--magnitude relations show no statistically significant dependence on environment.
  • We describe the target selection and resulting properties of a spectroscopic sample of luminous, red galaxies (LRG) from the imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These galaxies are selected on the basis of color and magnitude to yield a sample of luminous, intrinsically red galaxies that extends fainter and further than the main flux-limited portion of the SDSS galaxy spectroscopic sample. The sample is designed to impose a passively-evolving luminosity and rest-frame color cut to a redshift of 0.38. Additional, yet more luminous, red galaxies are included to a redshift of 0.5. Approximately 12 of these galaxies per square degree are targeted for spectroscopy, so the sample will number over 100,000 with the full survey. SDSS commissioning data indicate that the algorithm efficiently selects luminous (M_g=-21.4), red galaxies, that the spectroscopic success rate is very high, and that the resulting set of galaxies is approximately volume-limited out to z=0.38. When the SDSS is complete, the LRG spectroscopic sample will fill over 1h^-3 Gpc^3 with an approximately homogeneous population of galaxies and will therefore be well suited to studies of large-scale structure and clusters out to z=0.5.