• High-redshift, luminous, dusty star forming galaxies (DSFGs) constrain the extremity of galaxy formation theories. The most extreme are discovered through follow-up on candidates in large area surveys. Here we present 850 $\mu$m SCUBA-2 follow-up observations of 188 red DSFG candidates from the \textit{Herschel} Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) Large Mode Survey, covering 274 deg$^2$. We detected 87 per cent with a signal-to-noise ratio $>$ 3 at 850~$\mu$m. We introduce a new method for incorporating the confusion noise in our spectral energy distribution fitting by sampling correlated flux density fluctuations from a confusion limited map. The new 850~$\mu$m data provide a better constraint on the photometric redshifts of the candidates, with photometric redshift errors decreasing from $\sigma_z/(1+z)\approx0.21$ to $0.15$. Comparison spectroscopic redshifts also found little bias ($\langle (z-z_{\rm spec})/(1+z_{\rm spec})\rangle = 0.08 $). The mean photometric redshift is found to be 3.6 with a dispersion of $0.4$ and we identify 21 DSFGs with a high probability of lying at $z > 4$. After simulating our selection effects we find number counts are consistent with phenomenological galaxy evolution models. There is a statistically significant excess of WISE-1 and SDSS sources near our red galaxies, giving a strong indication that lensing may explain some of the apparently extreme objects. Nevertheless, our sample should include examples of galaxies with the highest star formation rates in the Universe ($\gg10^3$ M$_\odot$yr$^{-1}$).
  • The coeval AGN and galaxy evolution and the observed local relations between SMBHs and galaxy properties suggest some connection or feedback between SMBH growth and galaxy build-up. We looked for correlations between properties of X-ray detected AGN and their FIR detected host galaxies, to find quantitative evidences for this connection, highly debated in the latest years. We exploit the rich multi-wavelength data set available in the COSMOS field for a large sample (692 sources) of AGN and their hosts, in the redshift range $0.1<z<4$. We use X-ray data to select AGN and determine their properties (intrinsic luminosity and nuclear obscuration), and broad-band SED fitting to derive host galaxy properties (stellar mass $M_*$ and star formation rate SFR). We find that the AGN 2-10 keV luminosity ($L_{\rm X}$) and the host $8-1000~\mu m$ star formation luminosity ($L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$) are significantly correlated. However, the average host $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$ has a flat distribution in bins of AGN $L_{\rm X}$, while the average AGN $L_{\rm X}$ increases in bins of host $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$, with logarithmic slope of $\sim0.7$, in the redshifts range $0.4<z<1.2$. We also discuss the comparison between the distribution of these two quantities and the predictions from hydro-dynamical simulations. Finally we find that the average column density ($N_H$) shows a positive correlation with the host $M_*$, at all redshifts, but not with the SFR (or $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$). This translates into a negative correlation with specific SFR. Our results are in agreement with the idea that BH accretion and SF rates are correlated, but occur with different variability time scales. The presence of a positive correlation between $N_H$ and host $M_*$ suggests that the X-ray $N_H$ is not entirely due to the circum-nuclear obscuring torus, but may also include a contribution from the host galaxy.
  • We study a sample of six X-ray selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index alpha=0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, alpha_OX, of the X-ray selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of 1.69 +- 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically-selected BALQSOs typically have much larger alpha_OX and so are characterised as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray spectra are absorbed by a similar degree to that seen in optically-selected BALQSO samples; X-ray absorption appears to be ubiquitous in BALQSOs, but X-ray weakness is not. We argue that BALQSOs sit at one end of a spectrum of X-ray absorption properties in QSOs related to the degree of ultraviolet absorption in C IV 1550.
  • We investigate the properties of the galaxies selected from the deepest 850-micron survey undertaken to date with SCUBA-2 on the JCMT. This deep 850-micron imaging was taken in parallel with deep 450-micron imaging in the very best observing conditions as part of the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. A total of 106 sources were uncovered at 850 microns from ~150, sq. arcmin in the centre of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA/CANDELS field, imaged to a typical rms depth of ~0.25 mJy. We utilise the wealth of available deep multi-frequency data to establish the complete redshift distribution for this sample, yielding <z> = 2.38 +- 0.09, a mean redshift comparable with that derived for all but the brightest previous sub-mm samples. We have also been able to establish the stellar masses of the majority of the galaxy identifications, enabling us to explore their location on the star-formation-rate:stellar-mass (SFR:M*) plane. Crucially, our new deep sample reaches flux densities equivalent to SFR ~ 100 Msun/yr, enabling us to confirm that sub-mm galaxies form the high-mass end of the `main sequence' (MS) of star-forming galaxies at z > 1.5 (with a mean specific SFR of sSFR = 2.25 +- 0.19 /Gyr at z ~ 2.5). Our results are consistent with no significant flattening of the MS towards high masses at these redshifts, suggesting that reports of such flattening possibly arise from under-estimates of dust-enshrouded star-formation activity in massive star-forming galaxies. However, our findings add to the growing evidence that average sSFR rises only slowly at high redshift, resulting in log(sSFR) being an apparently simple linear function of the age of the Universe.
  • The Herschel Extragalactic Legacy Project (HELP) brings together a vast range of data from many astronomical observatories. Its main focus is on the Herschel data, which maps dust obscured star formation over 1300 deg$^2$. With this unprecedented combination of data sets, it is possible to investigate how the star formation vs stellar mass relation (main-sequence) of star-forming galaxies depends on environment. In this pilot study we explore this question between 0.1 < z < 3.2 using data in the COSMOS field. We estimate the local environment from a smoothed galaxy density field using the full photometric redshift probability distribution. We estimate star formation rates by stacking the SPIRE data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). Our analysis rules out the hypothesis that the main-sequence for star-forming systems is independent of environment at 1.5 < z < 2, while a simple model in which the mean specific star formation rate declines with increasing environmental density gives a better description. However, we cannot exclude a simple hypothesis in which the main-sequence for star-forming systems is independent of environment at z < 1.5 and z > 2. We also estimate the evolution of the star formation rate density in the COSMOS field and our results are consistent with previous measurements at z < 1.5 and z > 2 but we find a $1.4^{+0.3}_{-0.2}$ times higher peak value of the star formation rate density at $z \sim 1.9$.
  • We present an intrinsic AGN SED extending from the optical to the submm, derived with a sample of unobscured, optically luminous (vLv(5100)>10^43.5 erg/s) QSOs at z<0.18 from the Palomar Green survey. The intrinsic AGN SED was computed by removing the contribution from stars using the 11.3um polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) feature in the QSOs' mid-IR spectra; the 1sigma uncertainty on the SED ranges between 12 and 45 per cent as a function of wavelength and is a combination of PAH flux measurement errors and the uncertainties related to the conversion between PAH luminosity and star-forming luminosity. Longwards of 20um the shape of the intrinsic AGN SED is independent of the AGN power indicating that our template should be applicable to all systems hosting luminous AGN (vLv(5100) or L_X(2-10keV) > 10^43.5 erg/s). We note that for our sample of luminous QSOs, the average AGN emission is at least as high as, and mostly higher than, the total stellar powered emission at all wavelengths from the optical to the submm. This implies that in many galaxies hosting powerful AGN, there is no `safe' broadband photometric observation (at lambda<1000um) which can be used in calculating star-formation rates without subtracting the AGN contribution. Roughly, the AGN contribution may be ignored only if the intrinsic AGN luminosity at 5100 Ang is at least a factor of 4 smaller than the total infrared luminosity (L_IR; 8-1000um) of the galaxy. Finally, we examine the implication of our work in statistical studies of star-formation in AGN host galaxies.
  • We used wide area surveys over 39 deg$^2$ by the HerMES collaboration, performed with the Herschel Observatory SPIRE multi-wavelength camera, to estimate the low-redshift, $0.02<z<0.5$, monochromatic luminosity functions (LFs) of galaxies at 250, 350 and 500$\,\mu$m. SPIRE flux densities were also combined with Spitzer photometry and multi-wavelength archival data to perform a complete SED fitting analysis of SPIRE detected sources to calculate precise k-corrections, as well as the bolometric infrared (8-1000$\,\mu$m) luminosity functions and their low-$z$ evolution from a combination of statistical estimators. Integration of the latter prompted us to also compute the local luminosity density (LLD) and the comoving star formation rate density (SFRD) for our sources, and to compare them with theoretical predictions of galaxy formation models. The luminosity functions show significant and rapid luminosity evolution already at low redshifts, $0.02<z<0.2$, with L$_{IR}^* \propto (1+z)^{6.0\pm0.4}$ and $\Phi_{IR}^* \propto (1+z)^{-2.1\pm0.4}$, L$_{250}^* \propto (1+z)^{5.3\pm0.2}$ and $\Phi_{250}^* \propto (1+z)^{-0.6\pm0.4}$ estimated using the IR bolometric and the 250$\,\mu$m LFs respectively. Converting our IR LD estimate into an SFRD assuming a standard Salpeter IMF and including the unobscured contribution based on the UV dust-uncorrected emission from local galaxies, we estimate a SFRD scaling of SFRD$_0+0.08 z$, where SFRD$_0\simeq (1.9\pm 0.03)\times 10^{-2} [\mathrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{Mpc}^{-3}]$ is our total SFRD estimate at $z\sim0.02$.
  • We study the 850um emission in X-ray selected AGN in the 2 sq-deg COSMOS field using new data from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. We find 19 850um bright X-ray AGN in a high-sensitivity region covering 0.89 sq-deg with flux densities of S850=4-10 mJy. The 19 AGN span the full range in redshift and hard X-ray luminosity covered by the sample - 0.7<z<3.5 and 43.2<log10(LX) <45. We report a highly significant stacked 850um detection of a hard X-ray flux-limited population of 699 z>1 X-ray AGN - S850=0.71+/-0.08mJy. We explore trends in the stacked 850um flux densities with redshift, finding no evolution in the average cold dust emission over the redshift range probed. For Type 1 AGN, there is no significant correlation between the stacked 850um flux and hard X-ray luminosity. However, in Type 2 AGN the stacked submm flux is a factor of 2 higher at high luminosities. When averaging over all X-ray luminosities, no significant differences are found in the stacked submm fluxes of Type 1 and Type 2 AGN as well as AGN separated on the basis of X-ray hardness ratios and optical-to-infrared colours. However, at log10(LX) >44.4, dependences in average submm flux on the optical-to-infrared colours become more pronounced. We argue that these high luminosity AGN represent a transition from a secular to a merger-driven evolutionary phase where the star formation rates and accretion luminosities are more tightly coupled. Stacked AGN 850um fluxes are compared to the stacked fluxes of a mass-matched sample of K-band selected non-AGN galaxies. We find that at 10.5<log10(M*/M0)<11.5, the non-AGN 850um fluxes are 1.5-2x higher than in Type 2 AGN of equivalent mass. We suggest these differences are due to the presence of massive dusty, red starburst galaxies in the K-band selected non-AGN sample, which are not present in optically selected catalogues covering a smaller area.
  • We separate the extragalactic radio source population above ~50 uJy into active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming sources. The primary method of our approach is to fit the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), constructed using Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS and Herschel/SPIRE photometry, of 380 radio sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. From the fitted SEDs, we determine the relative AGN and star-forming contributions to their infrared emission. With the inclusion of other AGN diagnostics such as X-ray luminosity, Spitzer/IRAC colours, radio spectral index and the ratio of star-forming total infrared flux to k-corrected 1.4 GHz flux density, qIR, we determine whether the radio emission in these sources is powered by star formation or by an AGN. The majority of these radio sources (60 per cent) show the signature of an AGN at some wavelength. Of the sources with AGN signatures, 58 per cent are hybrid systems for which the radio emission is being powered by star formation. This implies that radio sources which have likely been selected on their star formation have a high AGN fraction. Below a 1.4 GHz flux density of 1 mJy, along with finding a strong contribution to the source counts from pure star-forming sources, we find that hybrid sources constitute 20-65 per cent of the sources. This result suggests that hybrid sources have a significant contribution, along with sources that do not host a detectable AGN, to the observed flattening of the source counts at ~1mJy for the extragalactic radio source population.
  • We study the relation of AGN accretion, star formation rate (SFR), and stellar mass (M$_*$) using a sample of $\approx$ 8600 star-forming galaxies up to z=2.5 selected with \textit{Herschel} imaging in the GOODS and COSMOS fields. For each of them we derive SFR and M$_*$, both corrected, when necessary, for emission from an active galactic nucleus (AGN), through the decomposition of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). About 10 per cent of the sample are detected individually in \textit{Chandra} observations of the fields. For the rest of the sample we stack the X-ray maps to get average X-ray properties. After subtracting the X-ray luminosity expected from star formation and correcting for nuclear obscuration, we derive the average AGN accretion rate for both detected sources and stacks, as a function of M$_{*}$, SFR and redshift. The average accretion rate correlates with SFR and with M$_*$. The dependence on SFR becomes progressively more significant at z$>$0.8. This may suggest that SFR is the original driver of these correlations. We find that average AGN accretion and star formation increase in a similar fashion with offset from the star-forming "main-sequence". Our interpretation is that accretion onto the central black hole and star formation broadly trace each other, irrespective of whether the galaxy is evolving steadily on the main-sequence or bursting.
  • We have assembled a sample of 5 X-ray-absorbed and submm-luminous type 1 QSOs at $z \sim 2$ which are simultaneously growing their central black holes through accretion and forming stars copiously. We present here the analysis of their rest-frame UV to submm Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs), including new Herschel data. Both AGN (direct and reprocessed) and Star Formation (SF) emission are needed to model their SEDs. From the SEDs and their UV-optical spectra we have estimated the masses of their black holes $M_{BH}\sim 10^{9}-10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$, their intrinsic AGN bolometric luminosities $L_{BOL}\sim(0.8 - 20)\times 10^{13} L_{\odot}$, Eddington ratios $L_{BOL}/L_{Edd}\sim 0.1 - 1.1$ and bolometric corrections $L_{BOL}/L_{X,2-10}\sim 30 - 500$. These values are common among optically and X-ray-selected type 1 QSOs (except for RX~J1249), except for the bolometric corrections, which are higher. These objects show very high far-infrared luminosities $L_{FIR}\sim$ (2 - 8)$\times10^{12}\,M_{\odot}$ and Star Formation Rates SFR$\sim 1000 M_{\odot}/$y. From their $L_{FIR}$ and the shape of their FIR-submm emission we have estimated star-forming dust masses of $M_{DUST}\sim 10^9\,M_\odot$. We have found evidence of a tentative correlation between the gas column densities of the ionized absorbers detected in X-ray (N$_{H_{ion}}$) and $SFR$. Our computed black hole masses are amongst the most massive known.
  • We present a detailed study of a X -ray selected sample of 5 submillimeter bright QSOs at $z\sim2$, where the highest rates of star formation (SF) and further growth of black holes (BH) occur. Therefore, this sample is a great laboratory to investigate the co-evolution of star formation and AGN. We present here the analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SED) of the 5 QSOS, including new data from Herschel PACS and SPIRE. Both AGN components (direct and reprocessed) and like Star Formation (SF) are needed to model its SED. From the SED and their UV-optical spectra we have estimated the mass of the black hole ($M_{BH} = 10^9 - 10^{10} M_{SUN}$) and bolometric luminosities of AGN ($L_{BOL} = (0.8-20) \times 10^{13} L_{SUN}$). These objects show very high luminosities in the far infrared range (at the H/ULIRG levels) and very high rates of SF (SFR = 400-1400 $M_{SUN}$/y). Known their current SFR and their BH masses, we deduce that their host galaxies must be already very massive, or would not have time to get to the local relation between BH mass and bulge. Finally, we found evidence of a possible correlation between the column density of ionized gas detected in X-rays ($NH_{ion}$) and SFR, which would provide a link between AGN and SF processes.
  • We present the most complete study to date of the X-ray emission from star-formation in high redshift (median z=0.7; z<1.5), IR-luminous (L_IR=10^10-10^13 L_sun) galaxies detected by Herschel's PACS and SPIRE instruments. For our purpose we take advantage of the deepest X-ray data to date, the Chandra deep fields (North and South). Sources which host AGN are removed from our analysis by means of multiple AGN indicators. We find an AGN fraction of 18+/-2 per cent amongst our sample and note that AGN entirely dominate at values of log[L_X/L_IR]>-3 in both hard and soft X-ray bands. From the sources which are star-formation dominated, only a small fraction are individually X-ray detected and for the bulk of the sample we calculate average X-ray luminosities through stacking. We find an average soft X-ray to infrared ratio of log[L_SX/L_IR]=-4.3 and an average hard X-ray to infrared ratio of log[L_HX/L_IR]=-3.8. We report that the X-ray/IR correlation is approximately linear through the entire range of L_IR and z probed and, although broadly consistent with the local (z<0.1) one, it does display some discrepancies. We suggest that these discrepancies are unlikely to be physical, i.e. due to an intrinsic change in the X-ray properties of star-forming galaxies with cosmic time, as there is no significant evidence for evolution of the L_X/L_IR ratio with redshift. Instead they are possibly due to selection effects and remaining AGN contamination. We also examine whether dust obscuration in the galaxy plays a role in attenuating X-rays from star-formation, by investigating changes in the L_X/L_IR ratio as a function of the average dust temperature. We conclude that X-rays do not suffer any measurable attenuation in the host galaxy.
  • We present Herschel/PACS observations of the nearby (z=0.1055) dwarf galaxy that has hosted the long gamma ray burst (LGRB) 031203. Using the PACS data we have been able to place constraints on the dust temperature, dust mass, total infrared luminosity and infrared-derived star-formation rate (SFR) for this object. We find that the GRB host galaxy (GRBH) 031203 has a total infrared luminosity of 3x10^10 L_sun placing it in the regime of the IR-luminous galaxy population. Its dust temperature and specific SFR are comparable to that of many high-redshift (z=0.3-2.5) infrared (IR)-detected GRB hosts (T_dust>40K ; sSFR>10 Gyr^-1), however its dust-to-stellar mass ratio is lower than what is commonly seen in IR-luminous galaxies. Our results suggest that GRBH 031203 is undergoing a strong starburst episode and its dust properties are different to those of local dwarf galaxies within the same metallicity and stellar mass range. Furthermore, our measurements place it in a distinct class to the well studied nearby host of GRB 980425 (z=0.0085), confirming the notion that GRB host galaxies can span a large range in properties even at similar cosmological epochs, making LGRBs an ideal tool in selecting samples of star-forming galaxies up to high redshift.
  • We present the first results from a near-IR spectroscopic survey of the COSMOS field, using the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Subaru telescope, designed to characterize the star-forming galaxy population at $1.4<z<1.7$. The high-resolution mode is implemented to detect H$\alpha$ in emission between $1.6{\rm -}1.8 \mathrm{\mu m}$ with $f_{\rm H\alpha}\gtrsim4\times10^{-17}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. Here, we specifically focus on 271 sBzK-selected galaxies that yield a H$\alpha$ detection thus providing a redshift and emission line luminosity to establish the relation between star formation rate and stellar mass. With further $J$-band spectroscopy for 89 of these, the level of dust extinction is assessed by measuring the Balmer decrement using co-added spectra. We find that the extinction ($0.6\lesssim A_\mathrm{H\alpha} \lesssim 2.5$) rises with stellar mass and is elevated at high masses compared to low-redshift galaxies. Using this subset of the spectroscopic sample, we further find that the differential extinction between stellar and nebular emission \hbox{$E_\mathrm{star}(B-V)/E_\mathrm{neb}(B-V)$} is 0.7--0.8, dissimilar to that typically seen at low redshift. After correcting for extinction, we derive an H$\alpha$-based main sequence with a slope ($0.81\pm0.04$) and normalization similar to previous studies at these redshifts.
  • We present a study of the infrared properties for a sample of seven spectroscopically confirmed submillimeter galaxies at $z>$4.0. By combining ground-based near-infrared, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, Herschel SPIRE, and ground-based submillimeter/millimeter photometry, we construct their Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) and a composite model to fit the SEDs. The model includes a stellar emission component at $\lambda_{\rm rest} <$ 3.5$ \mu$m; a hot dust component peaking at $\lambda_{rest} \sim$ 5$\,\mu$m; and cold dust component which becomes significant for $\lambda_{\rm rest} >$ 50$\,\mu$m. Six objects in the sample are detected at 250 and 350$ \mu$m. The dust temperatures for the sources in this sample are in the range of 40$-$80 K, and their $L_{\rm FIR}$ $\sim$ 10$^{13}$ L$_{\odot}$ qualifies them as Hyper$-$Luminous Infrared Galaxies (HyperLIRGs). The mean FIR-radio index for this sample is around $< q > = 2.2$ indicating no radio excess in their radio emission. Most sources in the sample have 24$ \mu$m detections corresponding to a rest-frame 4.5$ \mu$m luminosity of Log$_{10}$(L$_{4.5}$ / L$_{\odot}$) = 11 $\sim$ 11.5. Their L$_{\rm 4.5}$/$L_{\rm FIR}$ ratios are very similar to those of starburst dominated submillimeter galaxies at $z \sim$ 2. The $L_{\rm CO}-L_{\rm FIR}$ relation for this sample is consistent with that determined for local ULIRGs and SMGs at $z \sim$ 2. We conclude that submillimeter galaxies at $z >$ 4 are hotter and more luminous in the FIR, but otherwise very similar to those at $z \sim$ 2. None of these sources show any sign of the strong QSO phase being triggered.
  • [Abridged] We study the evolution of the dust temperatures of galaxies in the SFR-M* plane up to z~2 using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory. Starting from a sample of galaxies with reliable star-formation rates (SFRs), stellar masses (M*) and redshift estimates, we grid the SFR-M* parameter space in several redshift ranges and estimate the mean Tdust of each SFR-M*-z bin. Dust temperatures are inferred using the stacked far-infrared flux densities of our SFR-M*-z bins. At all redshifts, Tdust increases with infrared luminosities (LIR), specific SFRs (SSFR; i.e., SFR/M*) and distances with respect to the main sequence (MS) of the SFR-M* plane (i.e., D_SSFR_MS=log[SSFR(galaxy)/SSFR_MS(M*,z)]). The Tdust-SSFR and Tdust-D_SSFR_MS correlations are statistically more significant than the Tdust-LIR one. While the slopes of these three correlations are redshift-independent, their normalizations evolve from z=0 and z~2. We convert these results into a recipe to derive Tdust from SFR, M* and z. The existence of a strong Tdust-D_SSFR_MS correlation provides us with information on the dust and gas content of galaxies. (i) The slope of the Tdust-D__SSFR_MS correlation can be explained by the increase of the star-formation efficiency (SFE; SFR/Mgas) with D_SSFR_MS as found locally by molecular gas studies. (ii) At fixed D_SSFR_MS, the constant Tdust observed in galaxies probing large ranges in SFR and M* can be explained by an increase or decrease of the number of star-forming regions with comparable SFE enclosed in them. (iii) At high redshift, the normalization towards hotter temperature of the Tdust-D_SSFR_MS correlation can be explained by the decrease of the metallicities of galaxies or by the increase of the SFE of MS galaxies. All these results support the hypothesis that the conditions prevailing in the star-forming regions of MS and far-above-MS galaxies are different.
  • We study the incidence of nuclear obscuration on a complete sample of 1310 AGN selected on the basis of their rest-frame 2-10 keV X-ray flux from the XMM-COSMOS survey, in the redshift range 0.3<z<3.5. We classify the AGN as obscured or un-obscured on the basis of either the optical spectral properties and the overall SED or the shape of the X-ray spectrum. The two classifications agree in about 70% of the objects, and the remaining 30% can be further subdivided into two distinct classes: at low luminosities X-ray un-obscured AGN do not always show signs of broad lines or blue/UV continuum emission in their optical spectra, most likely due to galaxy dilution effects; at high luminosities broad line AGN may have absorbed X-ray spectra, which hints at an increased incidence of small-scale (sub-parsec) dust-free obscuration. We confirm that the fraction of obscured AGN is a decreasing function of the intrinsic X-ray luminosity, while the incidence of absorption shows significant evolution only for the most luminous AGN, which appear to be more commonly obscured at higher redshift. We find no significant difference between the mean stellar masses and star formation rates of obscured and un-obscured AGN hosts. We conclude that the physical state of the medium responsible for obscuration in AGN is complex, and mainly determined by the radiation environment (nuclear luminosity) in a small region enclosed within the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black hole, but is largely insensitive to the wider scale galactic conditions.
  • We present a method for selecting $z>4$ dusty, star forming galaxies (DSFGs) using Herschel/SPIRE 250/350/500 $\mu m$ flux densities to search for red sources. We apply this method to 21 deg$^2$ of data from the HerMES survey to produce a catalog of 38 high-$z$ candidates. Follow-up of the first 5 of these sources confirms that this method is efficient at selecting high-$z$ DSFGs, with 4/5 at $z=4.3$ to $6.3$ (and the remaining source at $z=3.4$), and that they are some of the most luminous dusty sources known. Comparison with previous DSFG samples, mostly selected at longer wavelengths (e.g., 850 $\mu m$) and in single-band surveys, shows that our method is much more efficient at selecting high-$z$ DSFGs, in the sense that a much larger fraction are at $z>3$. Correcting for the selection completeness and purity, we find that the number of bright ($S_{500\,\mu m} \ge 30$ mJy), red Herschel sources is $3.3 \pm 0.8$ deg$^{-2}$. This is much higher than the number predicted by current models, suggesting that the DSFG population extends to higher redshifts than previously believed. If the shape of the luminosity function for high-$z$ DSFGs is similar to that at $z\sim2$, rest-frame UV based studies may be missing a significant component of the star formation density at $z=4$ to $6$, even after correction for extinction.
  • The old, red stars which constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly from accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproven, that the tight correlation in mass of the black hole and stellar components results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, while powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared to submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report observations in the submillimetre and X-ray which show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 Gyrs old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10^44 erg/s. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxies of powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives a powerful outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host galaxy and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.
  • We study the link between observed ultraviolet luminosity, stellar mass, and dust attenuation within rest-frame UV-selected samples at z~ 4, 3, and 1.5. We measure by stacking at 250, 350, and 500 um in the Herschel/SPIRE images from the HerMES program the average infrared luminosity as a function of stellar mass and UV luminosity. We find that dust attenuation is mostly correlated with stellar mass. There is also a secondary dependence with UV luminosity: at a given UV luminosity, dust attenuation increases with stellar mass, while at a given stellar mass it decreases with UV luminosity. We provide new empirical recipes to correct for dust attenuation given the observed UV luminosity and the stellar mass. Our results also enable us to put new constraints on the average relation between star formation rate and stellar mass at z~ 4, 3, and 1.5. The star formation rate-stellar mass relations are well described by power laws (SFR~ M^0.7), with the amplitudes being similar at z~4 and z~3, and decreasing by a factor of 4 at z~1.5 at a given stellar mass. We further investigate the evolution with redshift of the specific star formation rate. Our results are in the upper range of previous measurements, in particular at z~3, and are consistent with a plateau at 3<z<4. Current model predictions (either analytic, semi-analytic or hydrodynamic) are inconsistent with these values, as they yield lower predictions than the observations in the redshift range we explore. We use these results to discuss the star formation histories of galaxies in the framework of the Main Sequence of star-forming galaxies. Our results suggest that galaxies at high redshift (2.5<z<4) stay around 1 Gyr on the Main Sequence. With decreasing redshift, this time increases such that z=1 Main Sequence galaxies with 10^8<M_*/Msun<10^10 stay on the Main Sequence until z=0.
  • We combine Herschel PACS and SPIRE maps of the full 2 deg^2 COSMOS field with existing multi-wavelength data to obtain template and model-independent optical-to-far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 4,218 Herschel-selected sources with log(L_IR/L_sun) = 9.4-13.6 and z = 0.02-3.54. Median SEDs are created by binning the optical to far-infrared (FIR) bands available in COSMOS as a function of infrared luminosity. Herschel probes rest-frame wavelengths where the bulk of the infrared radiation is emitted, allowing us to more accurately determine fundamental dust properties of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies. We find that the SED peak wavelength (lambda_peak) decreases and the dust mass (M_dust) increases with increasing total infrared luminosity (L_IR). In the lowest infrared luminosity galaxies (log(L_IR/L_sun) = 10.0-11.5), we see evidence of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) features (lambda=7-9 um), while in the highest infrared luminosity galaxies (L_IR > 10^12 L_sun) we see an increasing contribution of hot dust and/or power-law emission, consistent with the presence of heating from an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We study the relationship between stellar mass and star formation rate of our sample of infrared luminous galaxies and find no evidence that Herschel-selected galaxies follow the SFR/M_* "main sequence" as previously determined from studies of optically selected, star-forming galaxies. Finally, we compare the mid-infrared (MIR) to FIR properties of our infrared luminous galaxies using the previously defined diagnostic, IR8 = L_IR / L_8, and find that galaxies with L_IR > 10^11.3 L_sun tend to systematically lie above (~3-5) the IR8 "infrared main sequence", suggesting either suppressed PAH emission or an increasing contribution from AGN heating.
  • The dynamic range of photon counting micro-channel-plate (MCP) intensified charged-coupled device (CCD) instruments such as the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) is limited at the bright end by coincidence loss, the superposition of multiple photons in the individual frames recorded by the CCD. Photons which arrive during the brief period in which the image frame is transferred for read out of the CCD are displaced in the transfer direction in the recorded images. For sufficiently bright sources, these displaced counts form read-out streaks. Using UVOT observations of Tycho-2 stars, we investigate the use of these read-out streaks to obtain photometry for sources which are too bright (and hence have too much coincidence loss) for normal aperture photometry to be reliable. For read-out-streak photometry, the bright-source limiting factor is coincidence loss within the MCPs rather than the CCD. We find that photometric measurements can be obtained for stars up to 2.4 magnitudes brighter than the usual full-frame coincidence-loss limit by using the read-out streaks. The resulting bright-limit Vega magnitudes in the UVOT passbands are UVW2=8.80, UVM2=8.27, UVW1=8.86, u=9.76, b=10.53, v=9.31 and White=11.71; these limits are independent of the windowing mode of the camera. We find that a photometric precision of 0.1 mag can be achieved through read-out streak measurements. A suitable method for the measurement of read-out streaks is described and all necessary calibration factors are given.
  • We investigate the multi-wavelength properties of a sample of 450-\mu m selected sources from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS). A total of 69 sources were identified above 4\sigma\ in deep SCUBA-2 450-\mu m observations overlapping the UDS and COSMOS fields and covering 210 sq. arcmin to a typical depth of \sigma 450=1.5 mJy. Reliable cross identification are found for 58 sources (84 per cent) in Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR data. The photometric redshift distribution (dN/dz) of 450\mu m-selected sources is presented, showing a broad peak in the redshift range 1<z<3, and a median of z=1.4. Combining the SCUBA-2 photometry with Herschel SPIRE data from HerMES, the submm spectral energy distribution (SED) is examined via the use of modified blackbody fits, yielding aggregate values for the IR luminosity, dust temperature and emissivity of <LIR>=10^12 +/- 0.8 L_sol, <T_D>=42 +/- 11 K and <\beta_D>=1.6 +/- 0.5, respectively. The relationship between these SED parameters and the physical properties of galaxies is investigated, revealing correlations between T_D and LIR and between \beta_D and both stellar mass and effective radius. The connection between star formation rate and stellar mass is explored, with 24 per cent of 450 \mu m sources found to be ``star-bursts'', i.e. displaying anomalously high specific SFRs. However, both the number density and observed properties of these ``star-burst'' galaxies are found consistent with the population of normal star-forming galaxies.
  • Dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) are a UV-faint, IR-bright galaxy population that reside at z~2 and are believed to be in a phase of dusty star-forming and AGN activity. We present far-IR observations of a complete sample of DOGs in the 2 deg2 of COSMOS. The 3077 DOGs have <z>=1.9+/-0.3 and are selected from 24um and r+ observations using a color cut of r+ - [24]>=7.5 (AB mag) and S24>=100uJy. Based on the near-IR SEDs, 47% are star-formation dominated and 10% are AGN-dominated. We use SPIRE far-IR photometry from HerMES to calculate the IR luminosity and characteristic dust temperature for the 1572 (51%) DOGs that are detected at 250um (>=3{\sigma}). For the remaining 1505 (49%) that are undetected, we perform a median stacking analysis to probe fainter luminosities. Detected and undetected DOGs have average IR luminosities of (2.8+/-0.4) x 1012 LSun and (0.77+-0.08)x10^12LSun, and dust temperatures of 34+/-7 K and 37+/-3 K, respectively. The IR luminosity function of DOGs with S24>=100uJy is calculated, using far-IR observations and stacking. DOGs contribute 10-30% to the total star formation rate density of the Universe at z=1.5-2.5, dominated by 250um detected and bump DOGs. For comparison, DOGs contribute 30% to the star-formation rate density of the Universe for all galaxies at z=1.5-2.5 with S24>=100uJy. DOGs have a large scatter about the star-formation main sequence and their specific star-formation rates show that the observed phase of star-formation could be responsible for their observed stellar mass at z~2.