• We report on radio timing and multiwavelength observations of the 4.66 ms redback pulsar J1048+2339, which was discovered in an Arecibo search targeting the Fermi-LAT source 3FGLJ1048.6+2338. Two years of timing allowed us to derive precise astrometric and orbital parameters for the pulsar. PSR J1048+2339 is in a 6-hour binary, and exhibits radio eclipses over half the orbital period and rapid orbital period variations. The companion has a minimum mass of 0.3 solar masses, and we have identified a $V \sim 20$ variable optical counterpart in data from several surveys. The phasing of its $\sim 1$~mag modulation at the orbital period suggests highly efficient and asymmetric heating by the pulsar wind, which may be due to an intrabinary shock that is distorted near the companion, or to the companion's magnetic field channeling the pulsar wind to specific locations on its surface. We also present gamma-ray spectral analysis of the source and preliminary results from searches for gamma-ray pulsations using the radio ephemeris.
  • In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported in Kerr et al. (2012). We did not detect radio pulsations from another six pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets done to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs, and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in >1 d circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 Msun presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 d orbit with a ~0.25 Msun companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recently identified class of eccentric MSPs. PSR J1036-8317 is in an 8 hr binary with a >0.14 Msun companion that is probably a white dwarf. PSR J1946-5403 is in a 3 hr orbit with a >0.02 Msun companion with no evidence of radio eclipses.
  • We present new Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of eight radio-quiet Gamma-ray pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For all eight pulsars we identify the X-ray counterpart, based on the X-ray source localization and the best position obtained from Gamma-ray pulsar timing. For PSR J2030+4415 we found evidence for an about 10 arcsec-long pulsar wind nebula. Our new results consolidate the work from Marelli et al. 2011 and confirm that, on average, the Gamma-ray--to--X-ray flux ratios (Fgamma/Fx) of radio-quiet pulsars are higher than for the radio-loud ones. Furthermore, while the Fgamma/Fx distribution features a single peak for the radio-quiet pulsars, the distribution is more dispersed for the radio-loud ones, possibly showing two peaks. We discuss possible implications of these different distributions based on current models for pulsar X-ray emission.
  • We report a 5.4\sigma\ detection of pulsed gamma rays from PSR B1821-24 in the globular cluster M28 using ~44 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data that have been reprocessed with improved instrument calibration constants. We constructed a phase-coherent ephemeris, with post-fit residual RMS of 3 \mu s, using radio data spanning ~23.2 years, enabling measurements of the multi-wavelength light curve properties of PSR B1821-24 at the milliperiod level. We fold RXTE observations of PSR B1821-24 from 1996 to 2007 and discuss implications on the emission zones. The gamma-ray light curve consists of two peaks, separated by 0.41$\pm$0.02 in phase, with the first gamma-ray peak lagging the first radio peak by 0.05$\pm$0.02 in phase, consistent with the phase of giant radio pulses. We observe significant emission in the off-peak interval of PSR B1821-24 with a best-fit LAT position inconsistent with the core of M28. We do not detect significant gamma-ray pulsations at the spin or orbital periods from any other known pulsar in M28, and we place limits on the number of energetic pulsars in the cluster. The derived gamma-ray efficiency, ~2%, is typical of other gamma-ray pulsars with comparable spin-down power, suggesting that the measured spin-down rate ($2.2\times10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$) is not appreciably distorted by acceleration in the cluster potential. This confirms PSR B1821-24 as the second very energetic millisecond pulsar in a globular cluster and raises the question of whether these represent a separate class of objects that only form in regions of very high stellar density
  • Using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) we performed deep observations to search for radio pulsations in the directions of unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray sources. We report the discovery of an eclipsing black-widow millisecond pulsar, PSR J1544+4937, identified with the un-cataloged gamma-ray source Fermi J1544.2+4941. This 2.16 ms pulsar is in a 2.9 hours compact circular orbit with a very low-mass companion (Mc > 0.017 Msun). At 322 MHz this pulsar is found to be eclipsing for 13% of its orbit, whereas at 607 MHz the pulsar is detected throughout the low-frequency eclipse phase. Variations in the eclipse ingress phase are observed, indicating a clumpy and variable eclipsing medium. Moreover, additional short-duration absorption events are observed around the eclipse boundaries. Using the radio timing ephemeris we were able to detect gamma-ray pulsations from this pulsar, confirming it as the source powering the gamma-ray emission.
  • Accretion-powered X-ray pulsars exhibit significant variability of the Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Feature (CRSF) centroid energy on pulse-to-pulse timescales, and also on much longer timescales. Two types of spectral variability are observed. For sources in group 1, the CRSF energy is negatively correlated with the variable source luminosity, and for sources in group 2, the opposite behavior is observed. The physical basis for this bimodal behavior is currently not understood. We explore the hypothesis that the accretion dynamics in the group 1 sources is dominated by radiation pressure near the stellar surface, and that Coulomb interactions decelerate the gas to rest in the group 2 sources. We derive a new expression for the critical luminosity such that radiation pressure decelerates the matter to rest in the supercritical sources. The formula for the critical luminosity is evaluated for 5 sources, using the maximum value of the CRSF centroid energy to estimate the surface magnetic field strength. The results confirm that the group 1 sources are supercritical and the group 2 sources are subcritical, although the situation is less clear for those highly variable sources that cross over the critical line. We also explain the variation of the CRSF energy with luminosity as a consequence of the variation of the characteristic emission height. The sign of the height variation is opposite in the supercritical and subcritical cases, hence creating the observed bimodal behavior.
  • We report the discovery of nine previously unknown gamma-ray pulsars in a blind search of data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The pulsars were found with a novel hierarchical search method originally developed for detecting continuous gravitational waves from rapidly rotating neutron stars. Designed to find isolated pulsars spinning at up to kHz frequencies, the new method is computationally efficient, and incorporates several advances, including a metric-based gridding of the search parameter space (frequency, frequency derivative and sky location) and the use of photon probability weights. The nine pulsars have spin frequencies between 3 and 12 Hz, and characteristic ages ranging from 17 kyr to 3 Myr. Two of them, PSRs J1803-2149 and J2111+4606, are young and energetic Galactic-plane pulsars (spin-down power above 6e35 erg/s and ages below 100 kyr). The seven remaining pulsars, PSRs J0106+4855, J0622+3749, J1620-4927, J1746-3239, J2028+3332, J2030+4415, J2139+4716, are older and less energetic; two of them are located at higher Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10 deg). PSR J0106+4855 has the largest characteristic age (3 Myr) and the smallest surface magnetic field (2e11 G) of all LAT blind-search pulsars. PSR J2139+4716 has the lowest spin-down power (3e33 erg/s) among all non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars ever found. Despite extensive multi-frequency observations, only PSR J0106+4855 has detectable pulsations in the radio band. The other eight pulsars belong to the increasing population of radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars.
  • Since the launch of the Fermi satellite, the number of known gamma-ray pulsars has increased tenfold. Most gamma-ray detected pulsars are young and energetic, and many are associated with TeV sources. PSR J1357-6429 is a high spin-down power pulsar (Edot = 3.1 * 10^36 erg/s), discovered during the Parkes multibeam survey of the Galactic plane, with significant timing noise typical of very young pulsars. In the very-high-energy domain, H.E.S.S. has reported the detection of the extended source HESS J1356-645 (intrinsic Gaussian width of 12') whose centroid lies 7' from PSR J1357-6429. Using a rotational ephemeris obtained with 74 observations made with the Parkes telescope at 1.4 GHz, we phase-fold more than two years of gamma-ray data acquired by Fermi-LAT as well as those collected with XMM-Newton, and perform gamma-ray spectral modeling. Significant gamma and X-ray pulsations are detected from PSR J1357-6429. The light curve in both bands shows one broad peak. Gamma-ray spectral analysis of the pulsed emission suggests that it is well described by a simple power-law of index 1.5 +/- 0.3stat +/- 0.3syst with an exponential cut-off at 0.8 +/- 0.3stat +/- 0.3syst GeV and an integral photon flux above 100 MeV of (6.5 +/- 1.6stat +/- 2.3syst) * 10^-8 cm^-2 s^-1. The X-ray spectra obtained from the new data provide results consistent with those reported by Zavlin (2007). Upper limits on the gamma-ray emission from its potential pulsar wind nebula (PWN) are also reported. Assuming a distance of 2.4 kpc, the Fermi LAT energy flux yields a gamma-ray luminosity for PSR J1357-6429 of L_gamma = (2.13 +/- 0.25stat +/- 0.83syst) * 10^34 erg/s, consistent with an L_gamma \propto sqrt(Edot) relationship. The Fermi non-detection of the pulsar wind nebula associated with HESS J1356-645 provides new constraints on the electron population responsible for the extended TeV emission.
  • One of the main results of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope is the discovery of {\gamma}-ray selected pulsars. The high magnetic field pulsar, PSR J0007+7303 in CTA1, was the first ever to be discovered through its {\gamma}-ray pulsations. Based on analysis of 2 years of LAT survey data, we report on the discovery of {\gamma}-ray emission in the off-pulse phase interval at the ~ 6{\sigma} level. The flux from this emission in the energy range E \geq 100 MeV is F_100 = (1.73\pm0.40)\times10^(-8) photons/cm^2/s and is best fitted by a power law with a photon index of {\Gamma} = 2.54\pm0.14. The pulsed {\gamma}-ray flux in the same energy range is F_100 = (3.95\pm0.07)\times10^(-7) photons/cm^2/s and is best fitted by an exponentially-cutoff power-law spectrum with a photon index of {\Gamma} = 1.41 \pm 0.23 and a cutoff energy E_c = 4.04 \pm 0.20 GeV. We find no flux variability neither at the 2009 May glitch nor in the long term behavior. We model the {\gamma}-ray light curve with two high-altitude emission models, the outer gap and slot gap, and find that the model that best fits the data depends strongly on the assumed origin of the off-pulse emission. Both models favor a large angle between the magnetic axis and observer line of sight, consistent with the nondetection of radio emission being a geometrical effect. Finally we discuss how the LAT results bear on the understanding of the cooling of this neutron star.
  • We report the discovery of two millisecond pulsars in a search for radio pulsations at the positions of \emph{Fermi Large Area Telescope} sources with no previously known counterparts, using the Nan\c{c}ay radio telescope. The two millisecond pulsars, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, have rotational periods of 2.896 and 5.192 ms and are both in binary systems with low-eccentricity orbits and orbital periods of 2.2 and 125.9 days respectively, suggesting long recycling processes. Gamma-ray pulsations were subsequently detected for both objects, indicating that they power the associated \emph{Fermi} sources in which they were found. The gamma-ray light curves and spectral properties are similar to those of previously-detected gamma-ray millisecond pulsars. Detailed modeling of the observed radio and gamma-ray light curves shows that the gamma-ray emission seems to originate at high altitudes in their magnetospheres. Additionally, X-ray observations revealed the presence of an X-ray source at the position of PSR J2302+4442, consistent with thermal emission from a neutron star. These discoveries along with the numerous detections of radio-loud millisecond pulsars in gamma rays suggest that many \emph{Fermi} sources with no known counterpart could be unknown millisecond pulsars.
  • We present precise phase-connected pulse timing solutions for 16 gamma-ray-selected pulsars recently discovered using the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope plus one very faint radio pulsar (PSR J1124-5916) that is more effectively timed with the LAT. We describe the analysis techniques including a maximum likelihood method for determining pulse times of arrival from unbinned photon data. A major result of this work is improved position determinations, which are crucial for multi-wavelength follow up. For most of the pulsars, we overlay the timing localizations on X-ray images from Swift and describe the status of X-ray counterpart associations. We report glitches measured in PSRs J0007+7303, J1124-5916, and J1813-1246. We analyze a new 20 ks Chandra ACIS observation of PSR J0633+0632 that reveals an arcminute-scale X-ray nebula extending to the south of the pulsar. We were also able to precisely localize the X-ray point source counterpart to the pulsar and find a spectrum that can be described by an absorbed blackbody or neutron star atmosphere with a hard powerlaw component. Another Chandra ACIS image of PSR J1732-3131 reveals a faint X-ray point source at a location consistent with the timing position of the pulsar. Finally, we present a compilation of new and archival searches for radio pulsations from each of the gamma-ray-selected pulsars as well as a new Parkes radio observation of PSR J1124-5916 to establish the gamma-ray to radio phase offset.
  • We searched for radio pulsars in 25 of the non-variable, unassociated sources in the Fermi LAT Bright Source List with the Green Bank Telescope at 820 MHz. We report the discovery of three radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from a high Galactic latitude subset of these sources. All of the pulsars are in binary systems, which would have made them virtually impossible to detect in blind gamma-ray pulsation searches. They seem to be relatively normal, nearby (<=2 kpc) millisecond pulsars. These observations, in combination with the Fermi detection of gamma-rays from other known radio MSPs, imply that most, if not all, radio MSPs are efficient gamma-ray producers. The gamma-ray spectra of the pulsars are power-law in nature with exponential cutoffs at a few GeV, as has been found with most other pulsars. The MSPs have all been detected as X-ray point sources. Their soft X-ray luminosities of ~10^{30-31} erg/s are typical of the rare radio MSPs seen in X-rays.
  • Narayan and Heyl (2002) have developed a theoretical framework to convert suitable upper limits on type I X-ray bursts from accreting black hole candidates (BHCs) into evidence for an event horizon. However, no appropriate observational limit exists in the literature. In this paper we survey 2101.2 ks of data from the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) X-ray timing experiment and 5142 ks of data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) experiment to obtain a formal constraint of this type. 1122 ks of neutron star data yield a population averaged mean burst rate of 1.69 x 10-5 bursts s-1 while 6081 ks of BHC data yield a 95% confidence level upper limit of 4.9 x 10-7 bursts s-1. This is the first published limit of this type for Black Hole Candidates. Applying the theoretical framework of Narayan and Heyl (2002) we calculate regions of unstable luminosity where the neutron stars are expected to burst and the BHCs would be expected to burst if they had a surface. In this unstable luminosity region 464 ks of neutron star data yield an averaged mean burst rate of 4.1 x 10-5 bursts s-1 and 1512 ks of BHC data yield a 95% confidence level upper limit of 2.0 x 10-6 bursts s-1, and a limit of > 10\sigma that BHCs do not burst with a rate similar to the rate of neutron stars in these unstable regions. This gives further evidence that BHCs do not have surfaces unless there is some new physics occurring on their surface.
  • We present 7 eclipse timings of the low mass X-ray binary EXO0748-676 obtained with the USA experiment during 1999-2000 as well as 122 eclipse timings obtained with RXTE during 1996-2000. According to our analysis, the mean orbital period has increased by ~8 ms between the pre-RXTE era (1985-1990) and the RXTE/USA era (1996-2000). This corresponds to an orbital period derivative of P(orb)/(dP(orb)/dt)~2x10^7 years. However, neither a constant orbital period derivative nor any other simple ephemeris provides an acceptable fit to the data: individual timings of eclipse centers have residuals of up to 15 or more seconds away from our derived smooth ephemerides. When we consider all published eclipse timing data including those presented here, a model that includes observational measurement error, cumulative period jitter, and underlying period evolution is found to be consistent with the timing data. We discuss several physical mechanisms for LMXB orbital evolution in an effort to account for the change in orbital period and the observed intrinsic jitter in the mid-eclipse times.
  • We report on timing and spectral observations of the 2000 outburst of XTE J1550-564 made by the Unconventional Stellar Aspect (USA) Experiment on board the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). We observe a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO) with a centroid frequency that tends to increase with increasing flux and a fractional rms amplitude which is correlated with the hardness ratio. The evolution of the hardness ratio (4--16 keV/1--4 keV) with time and source flux is examined. The hardness-intensity diagram (HID) shows a cyclical movement in the clockwise direction and possibly indicates the presence of two independent accretion flows. We observe a relationship between the USA 4--16 keV count rate and radio observations and discuss this in the context of previously observed correlations between X-ray, radio, optical and IR data. We examine our results in the context of models invoking two accretion flows: a thin disk and a hot sub-Keplerian flow.
  • The USA experiment on ARGOS and RXTE have exensively observed the X-ray transient XTE J1118+480 during its recent outburst in 2000 April--June. We present detailed monitoring of the evolution of a low frequency QPO which drifts from 0.07 Hz to 0.15 Hz during the outburst. We examine possible correlations of the QPO frequency with the flux and spectral characteristics of the source, and compare this QPO to low frequency QPOs observed in other black hole candidates.