• The split main sequences (MSs) and extended MS turnoffs (eMSTOs) detected in a few young clusters have demonstrated that these stellar systems host multiple populations differing in a number of properties such as rotation and, possibly, age.We analyze Hubble Space Telescope photometry for thirteen clusters with ages between ~40 and ~1000 Myrs and of different masses. Our goal is to investigate for the first time the occurrence of multiple populations in a large sample of young clusters. We find that all the clusters exhibit the eMSTO phenomenon and that MS stars more massive than ~1.6 solar masses define a blue and red MS, with the latter hosting the majority of MS stars. The comparison between the observations and isochrones suggests that the blue MSs are made of slow-rotating stars, while the red MSs host stars with rotational velocities close to the breakup value. About half of the bright MS stars in the youngest clusters are H-alpha emitters. These Be stars populate the red MS and the reddest part of the eMSTO thus supporting the idea that the red MS is made of fast rotators. We conclude that the split MS and the eMSTO are a common feature of young clusters in both Magellanic Clouds. The phenomena of a split MS and an eMSTO occur for stars that are more massive than a specific threshold which is independent of the host-cluster mass. As a by-product, we report the serendipitous discovery of a young SMC cluster, GALFOR1.
  • We present a timing analysis of the 2015 outburst of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658, using non-simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuStar observations. We estimate the pulsar spin frequency and update the system orbital solution. Combining the average spin frequency from the previous observed, we confirm the long-term spin down at an average rate $\dot{\nu}_{\text{SD}}=1.5(2)\times 10^{-15}$ Hz s$^{-1}$. We also discuss possible corrections to the spin down rate accounting for mass accretion onto the compact object when the system is X-ray active. Finally, combining the updated ephemerides with those of the previous outbursts, we find a long-term orbital evolution compatible with a binary expansion at a mean rate $\dot{P}_{orb}=3.6(4)\times 10^{-12}$ s s$^{-1}$, in agreement with previously reported values. This fast evolution is incompatible with an evolution driven by angular momentum losses caused by gravitational radiation under the hypothesis of conservative mass transfer. We discuss the observed orbital expansion in terms of non-conservative mass transfer and gravitational quadrupole coupling mechanism. We find that the latter can explain, under certain conditions, small fluctuations (of the order of few seconds) of the orbital period around a global parabolic trend. At the same time, a non-conservative mass transfer is required to explain the observed fast orbital evolution, which likely reflects ejection of a large fraction of mass from the inner Lagrangian point caused by the irradiation of the donor by the magneto-dipole rotator during quiescence (radio-ejection model). This strong outflow may power tidal dissipation in the companion star and be responsible of the gravitational quadrupole change oscillations.
  • The Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy survey of Galactic Globular Clusters (GC) is characterising many different aspects of their multiple stellar populations. The "Grundahl-jump" (G-jump) is a discontinuity in ultraviolet brightness of blue horizontal branch (HB) stars, signalling the onset of radiative metal levitation. The HB Legacy data confirmed that the G-jump is located at the same T$_{eff}$ ($\simeq$11,500 K) in nearly all clusters. The only exceptions are the metal-rich clusters NGC 6388 and NGC 6441, where the G-jump occurs at T$_{eff}\simeq$13-14,000K. We compute synthetic HB models based on new evolutionary tracks including the effect of helium diffusion, and approximately accounting for the effect of metal levitation in a stable atmosphere. Our models show that the G-jump location depends on the interplay between the timescale of diffusion and the timescale of the evolution in the T$_{eff}$ range 11,500 K$\lessapprox$T$_{eff}\lessapprox$14,000 K. The G-jump becomes hotter than 11,500 K only for stars that have, in this T$_{eff}$ range, a helium mass fraction Y>0.35. Similarly high Y values are also consistent with the modelling of the HB in NGC 6388 and NGC 6441. In these clusters we predict that a significant fraction of HB stars show helium in their spectra above 11,500 K, and full helium settling should only be found beyond the hotter G-jump.
  • We study the formation of multiple populations in globular clusters (GC), under the hypothesis that stars in the second generation formed from the winds of intermediate-mass stars, ejected during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase, possibly diluted with pristine gas, sharing the same chemical composition of first-generation stars. To this aim, we use the recent APOGEE data, which provide the surface chemistry of a large sample of giant stars, belonging to clusters that span a wide metallicity range. The APOGEE data set is particularly suitable to discriminate among the various pollution scenarios proposed so far, as it provides the surface abundances of Mg and Al, the two elements involved in a nuclear channel extremely sensitive to the temperature, hence to the metallicity of the polluters. The present analysis shows a remarkable agreement between the observations and the theoretical yields from massive AGB stars. In particular, the observed extension of the depletion of Mg and O and the increase in Al is well reproduced by the models and the trend with the metallicity is also fully accounted for. This study further supports the idea that AGB stars were the key players in the pollution of the intra-cluster medium, from which additional generations of stars formed in GC.
  • We explain the multiple populations recently found in the 'prototype' Globular Cluster (GC) NGC 2808 in the framework of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) scenario. The chemistry of the five -or more- populations is approximately consistent with a sequence of star formation events, starting after the supernovae type II epoch, lasting approximately until the time when the third dredge up affects the AGB evolution (age ~90-120Myr), and ending when the type Ia supernovae begin exploding in the cluster, eventually clearing it from the gas. The formation of the different populations requires episodes of star formation in AGB gas diluted with different amounts of pristine gas. In the nitrogen-rich, helium-normal population identified in NGC 2808 by the UV Legacy Survey of GCs, the nitrogen increase is due to the third dredge up in the smallest mass AGB ejecta involved in the star formation of this population. The possibly-iron-rich small population in NGC 2808 may be a result of contamination by a single type Ia supernova. The NGC 2808 case is used to build a general framework to understand the variety of 'second generation' stars observed in GCs. Cluster-to-cluster variations are ascribed to differences in the effects of the many processes and gas sources which may be involved in the formation of the second generation. We discuss an evolutionary scheme, based on pollution by delayed type II supernovae, which accounts for the properties of s-Fe-anomalous clusters.
  • We use images acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 and new models to probe the Horizontal Branch (HB) population of the We use images acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 and new models to probe the horizontal branch (HB) population of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 2419. A detailed analysis of the composite HB highlights three populations:(1) the blue luminous HB, hosting standard helium stars (Y=0.25) with a very small spread of mass, (2) a small population of stars with intermediate helium content (0.26<Y<=0.29), and (3) the well-populated extreme HB. We can fit the last group with models having high helium abundance (Y \sim 0.36), half of which (the hottest part, 'blue hook' stars) are identified as possible 'late flash mixed stars'. The initial helium abundance of this extreme population is in nice agreement with the predicted helium abundance in the ejecta of massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars of the same metallicity as NGC 2419. This result further supports the hypothesis that second-generation stars in GCs formed from the ashes of intermediate-mass AGB stars. We find that the distribution in magnitude of the blue hook stars is larger than that predicted by theoretical models. We discuss the possible uncertainties in the magnitude scales and different attempts to model this group of stars. Finally, we suggest that consistency can be better achieved if we assume core masses larger than predicted by our models. This may be possible if the progenitors were fast rotators on the main sequence. If further study confirms this interpretation, a fast initial rotation would be a strong signature of the peculiarity of extreme second-generation stars in GCs.
  • We use the combination of photometric and spectroscopic data of 47 Tuc stars to reconstruct the possible formation of a second generation of stars in the central regions of the cluster, from matter ejected from massive Asymptotic Giant Branch stars, diluted with pristine gas. The yields from massive AGB stars with the appropriate metallicity (Z=0.004, i.e. [Fe/H]=-0.75) are compatible with the observations, in terms of extension and slope of the patterns observed, involving oxygen, nitrogen, sodium and aluminium. Based on the constraints on the maximum helium of 47 Tuc stars provided by photometric investigations, and on the helium content of the ejecta, we estimate that the gas out of which second generation stars formed was composed of about one-third of gas from intermediate mass stars, with M>= 5Mo and about two-thirds of pristine gas. We tentatively identify the few stars whose Na, Al and O abundances resemble the undiluted AGB yields with the small fraction of 47 Tuc stars populating the faint subgiant branch. From the relative fraction of first and second generation stars currently observed, we estimate that the initial FG population in 47 Tuc was about 7.5 times more massive than the cluster current total mass.
  • We examine the photometric data for Fornax clusters, focussing our attention on their horizontal branch color distribution and, when available, on the RR Lyr variables fraction and period distribution. Based on our understanding of the HB morphology in terms of varying helium content in the context of multiple stellar generations, we show that clusters F2, F3 and F5 must contain substantial fractions of second generation stars (~54-65%). On the basis of a simple chemical evolution model we show that the helium distribution in these clusters can be reproduced by models with cluster initial masses ranging from values equal to ~4 to ~10 times larger than the current masses. Models with a very short second generation star formation episode can also reproduce the observed helium distribution but require larger initial masses up to about twenty times the current mass. While the lower limit of this range of possible initial GC masses is consistent with those suggested by the observations of the low metallicity field stars, we also discuss the possibility that the metallicity scale of field stars (based on CaII triplet spectroscopy) and the metallicities derived for the clusters in Fornax may not be consistent with each other. The reproduction of the HB morphology in F2,F3,F5 requires two interesting hypotheses: 1) the first generation HB stars lie all at "red" colours. According to this interpretation, the low metallicity stars in the field of Fornax, populating the HB at colours bluer than the blue side ((V-I)o<=0.3 or (B-V)o<=0.2) of the RR Lyrs, should be second generation stars born in the clusters;a preliminary analysis of available colour surveys of Fornax field provides a fraction ~20% of blue HB stars, in the low metallicity range; 2) the mass loss from individual second generation red giants is a few percent of a solar mass larger than the mass loss from first generation stars.