• We describe Castalia, a proposed mission to rendezvous with a Main Belt Comet (MBC), 133P/Elst-Pizarro. MBCs are a recently discovered population of apparently icy bodies within the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, which may represent the remnants of the population which supplied the early Earth with water. Castalia will perform the first exploration of this population by characterising 133P in detail, solving the puzzle of the MBC's activity, and making the first in situ measurements of water in the asteroid belt. In many ways a successor to ESA's highly successful Rosetta mission, Castalia will allow direct comparison between very different classes of comet, including measuring critical isotope ratios, plasma and dust properties. It will also feature the first radar system to visit a minor body, mapping the ice in the interior. Castalia was proposed, in slightly different versions, to the ESA M4 and M5 calls within the Cosmic Vision programme. We describe the science motivation for the mission, the measurements required to achieve the scientific goals, and the proposed instrument payload and spacecraft to achieve these.
  • The solar system started to form about 4.56 Gyr ago and despite the long intervening time span, there still exist several clues about its formation. The three major sources for this information are meteorites, the present solar system structure and the planet-forming systems around young stars. In this introduction we give an overview of the current understanding of the solar system formation from all these different research fields. This includes the question of the lifetime of the solar protoplanetary disc, the different stages of planet formation, their duration, and their relative importance. We consider whether meteorite evidence and observations of protoplanetary discs point in the same direction. This will tell us whether our solar system had a typical formation history or an exceptional one. There are also many indications that the solar system formed as part of a star cluster. Here we examine the types of cluster the Sun could have formed in, especially whether its stellar density was at any stage high enough to influence the properties of today's solar system. The likelihood of identifying siblings of the Sun is discussed. Finally, the possible dynamical evolution of the solar system since its formation and its future are considered.
  • Radioisotopic ages for meteorites and their components provide constraints on the evolution of small bodies: timescales of accretion, thermal and aqueous metamorphism, differentiation, cooling and impact metamorphism. Realising that the decay heat of short-lived nuclides (e.g. 26Al, 60Fe), was the main heat source driving differentiation and metamorphism, thermal modeling of small bodies is of utmost importance to set individual meteorite age data into the general context of the thermal evolution of their parent bodies, and to derive general conclusions about the nature of planetary building blocks in the early solar system. As a general result, modelling easily explains that iron meteorites are older than chondrites, as early formed planetesimals experienced a higher concentration of short-lived nuclides and more severe heating. However, core formation processes may also extend to 10 Ma after formation of Calcium-Aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs). A general effect of the porous nature of the starting material is that relatively small bodies (< few km) will also differentiate if they form within 2 Ma after CAIs. A particular interesting feature to be explored is the possibility that some chondrites may derive from the outer undifferentiated layers of asteroids that are differentiated in their interiors. This could explain the presence of remnant magnetization in some chondrites due to a planetary magnetic field.