• We present the results of optical identifications and spectroscopic redshifts measurements for galaxy clusters from 2-nd Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources (PSZ2), located at high redshifts, $z\approx0.7-0.9$. We used the data of optical observations obtained with Russian-Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT150), Sayan observatory 1.6-m telescope, Calar Alto 3.5-m telescope and 6-m SAO RAS telescope (Bolshoi Teleskop Alt-azimutalnyi, BTA). Spectroscopic redshift measurements were obtained for seven galaxy clusters, including one cluster, PSZ2 G126.57+51.61, from the cosmological sample of PSZ2 catalogue. In central regions of two clusters, PSZ2 G069.39+68.05 and PSZ2 G087.39-34.58, the strong gravitationally lensed background galaxies are found, one of them at redshift $z=4.262$. The data presented below roughly double the number of known galaxy clusters in the second Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources at high redshifts, $z\approx0.8$.
  • On 17 January 2010, STEREO-B observed in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white light a large-scale dome-shaped expanding coronal transient with perfectly connected off-limb and on-disk signatures. Veronig et al. (2010, ApJL 716, 57) concluded that the dome was formed by a weak shock wave. We have revealed two EUV components, one of which corresponded to this transient. All of its properties found from EUV, white light, and a metric type II burst match expectations for a freely expanding coronal shock wave including correspondence to the fast-mode speed distribution, while the transient sweeping over the solar surface had a speed typical of EUV waves. The shock wave was presumably excited by an abrupt filament eruption. Both a weak shock approximation and a power-law fit match kinematics of the transient near the Sun. Moreover, the power-law fit matches expansion of the CME leading edge up to 24 solar radii. The second, quasi-stationary EUV component near the dimming was presumably associated with a stretched CME structure; no indications of opening magnetic fields have been detected far from the eruption region.
  • Mark 4, COR1/STEREO and LASCO/SOHO data analysis shows that at least a portion of type II radio bursts observed in the corona occurs in the presence of a CME, but in the absence of a shock ahead of them. A drift current instability in the CME frontal structure is discussed as a possible cause of such bursts.
  • Recently Tsurutani et al., (2008) (Paper 1) analyzed the complex interplanetary structures during 7 to 8 November, 2004 to identify their properties as well as resultant geomagnetic effects and the solar origins. Besides mentioned paper by Gopalswamy et al., (2006) the solar and interplanetary sources of geomagnetic storm on 7-10 November, 2004 have also been discussed in details in series of other papers. Some conclusions of these works essentially differ from conclusions of the Paper 1 but have not been discussed by authors of Paper 1. In this comment we would like to discuss some of these distinctions.