• La-filled skutterudites LaxCo4Sb12 (x : 0.25 and 0.5) have been synthesized and sintered in one step under high-pressure conditions at 3.5 GPa in a piston-cylinder hydrostatic press. The structural properties of the reaction products were characterized by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, clearly showing an uneven filling factor of the skutterudite phases, confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The non-homogeneous distribution of La filling atoms is adequate to produce a significant decrease in lattice thermal conductivity, mainly due to strain field scattering of high-energy phonons. Furthermore, the lanthanum filler primarily acts as an Einstein-like vibrational mode having a strong impact on the phonon scattering. Extra-low thermal conductivity values of 2.39 W/mK and 1.30 W/mK are measured for La0.25Co4Sb12 and La0.5Co4Sb12 nominal compositions at 780 K, respectively. Besides this, lanthanum atoms have contributed to increase the charge carrier concentration in the samples. In the case of La0.25Co4Sb12, there is an enhancement of the power factor and an improvement of the thermoelectric properties.
  • At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are classically controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from correlations between transition metal and oxygen ions. Strong correlations thus offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. Here we show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metaloxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we probe charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate, exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence.
  • $\mathrm{La_{1.85}Sr_{0.15}CuO_4}$/$\mathrm{La_2CuO_4}$ (LSCO15/LCO) bilayers with a precisely controlled thickness of N unit cells (UCs) of the former and M UCs of the latter ([LSCO15\_N/LCO\_M]) were grown on (001)-oriented {\slao} (SLAO) substrates with pulsed laser deposition (PLD). X-ray diffraction and reciprocal space map (RSM) studies confirmed the epitaxial growth of the bilayers and showed that a [LSCO15\_2/LCO\_2] bilayer is fully strained, whereas a [LSCO15\_2/LCO\_7] bilayer is already partially relaxed. The \textit{in situ} monitoring of the growth with reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) revealed that the gas environment during deposition has a surprisingly strong effect on the growth mode and thus on the amount of disorder in the first UC of LSCO15 (or the first two monolayers of LSCO15 containing one $\mathrm{CuO_2}$ plane each). For samples grown in pure $\mathrm{N_2O}$ gas (growth type-B), the first LSCO15 UC next to the SLAO substrate is strongly disordered. This disorder is strongly reduced if the growth is performed in a mixture of $\mathrm{N_2O}$ and $\mathrm{O_2}$ gas (growth type-A). Electric transport measurements confirmed that the first UC of LSCO15 next to the SLAO substrate is highly resistive and shows no sign of superconductivity for growth type-B, whereas it is superconducting for growth type-A. Furthermore, we found, rather surprisingly, that the conductivity of the LSCO15 UC next to the LCO capping layer strongly depends on the thickness of the latter. A LCO capping layer with 7~UCs leads to a strong localization of the charge carriers in the adjacent LSCO15 UC and suppresses superconductivity. The magneto-transport data suggest a similarity with the case of weakly hole doped LSCO single crystals that are in a so-called {"{cluster-spin-glass state}"}
  • We show that in Pr$ _{0.5} $La$ _{0.2} $Ca$ _{0.3} $MnO$ _{3} $/YBa$ _{2} $Cu$ _{3} $O$ _{7} $ (PLCMO/YBCO) multilayers the low temperature state of YBCO is very resistive and resembles the one of a granular superconductor or a frustrated Josephson-junction network. Notably, a coherent superconducting response can be restored with a large magnetic field which also suppresses the charge-orbital order in PLCMO. This coincidence suggests that the granular superconducting state of YBCO is induced by the charge-orbital order of PLCMO. The coupling mechanism and the nature of the induced inhomogeneous state in YBCO remain to be understood.
  • With x-ray absorption spectroscopy and polarized neutron reflectometry we studied how the magnetic proximity effect at the interface between the cuprate high-$T_C$ superconductor $\mathrm{YBa_2Cu_3O_7}$ (YBCO) and the ferromagnet $\mathrm{La_{2/3}Ca_{1/3}MnO_3}$ (LCMO) is related to the electronic and magnetic properties of the LCMO layers. In particular, we explored how the magnitude of the ferromagnetic Cu moment on the YBCO side depends on the strength of the antiferromagnetic (AF) exchange coupling with the Mn moment on the LCMO side. We found that the Cu moment remains sizeable if the AF coupling with the Mn moments is strongly reduced or even entirely suppressed. The ferromagnetic order of the Cu moments thus seems to be intrinsic to the interfacial CuO$_2$ planes and related to a weakly ferromagnetic intra-planar exchange interaction. The latter is discussed in terms of the partial occupation of the Cu $3d_{3z^2-r^2}$ orbitals, which occurs in the context of the so-called orbital reconstruction of the interfacial Cu ions.
  • Given the paucity of single phase multiferroic materials (with large ferromagnetic moment), composite systems seem an attractive solution in the quest to realize magnetoelectric cou-pling between ferromagnetic and ferroelectric order parameters. Despite having antiferro-magnetic order, BiFeO3 (BFO) has nevertheless been a key material in this quest due to excel-lent ferroelectric properties at room temperature. We studied a superlattice composed of 8 repetitions of 6 unit cells of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) grown on 5 unit cells of BFO. Significant net uncompensated magnetization in BFO is demonstrated using polarized neutron reflectometry in an insulating superlattice. Remarkably, the magnetization enables magnetic field to change the dielectric properties of the superlattice, which we cite as an example of synthetic magnetoelectric coupling. Importantly, this controlled creation of magnetic moment in BFO suggests a much needed path forward for the design and implementation of integrated oxide devices for next generation magnetoelectric data storage platforms.
  • Epitaxial La1.85Sr0.15CuO4/La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 superlattices on (001)-oriented LaSrAlO4 substrates have been grown with pulsed laser deposition technique. Their structural, magnetic and superconducting properties have been determined with in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, specular neutron reflectometry, scanning transmission electron microscopy, electric transport, and magnetization measurements. We find that despite the large mismatch between the in-plane lattice parameters of LSCO and LCMO these superlattices can be grown epitaxially and with a high crystalline quality. While the first LSCO layer remains clamped to the LSAO substrate, a sizeable strain relaxation occurs already in the first LCMO layer. The following LSCO and LCMO layers adopt a nearly balanced state in which the tensile and compressive strain effects yield alternating in-plane lattice parameters with an almost constant average value. No major defects are observed in the LSCO layers, while a significant number of vertical antiphase boundaries are found in the LCMO layers. The LSCO layers remain superconducting with a relatively high superconducting onset temperature of about 36 K. The macroscopic superconducting response is also evident in the magnetization data due to a weak diamagnetic signal below 10 K for H || ab and a sizeable paramagnetic shift for H || c that can be explained in terms of a vortex-pinning-induced flux compression. The LCMO layers maintain a strongly ferromagnetic state with a Curie temperature of about 190 K and a large low-temperature saturation moment of about 3.5(1) muB. These results suggest that the LSCO/LCMO superlattices can be used to study the interaction between the antagonistic ferromagnetic and superconducting orders and, in combination with previous studies on YBCO/LCMO superlattices, may allow one to identify the relevant mechanisms.
  • Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antiferromagnets as the active component in spintronic devices. This is in contrast to their current passive role as pinning layers in hard disk read heads and magnetic memories. Here we report the epitaxial growth of a new high-temperature antiferromagnetic material, tetragonal CuMnAs, which exhibits excellent crystal quality, chemical order and compatibility with existing semiconductor technologies. We demonstrate its growth on the III-V semiconductors GaAs and GaP, and show that the structure is also lattice matched to Si. Neutron diffraction shows collinear antiferromagnetic order with a high Ne\'el temperature. Combined with our demonstration of room-temperature exchange coupling in a CuMnAs/Fe bilayer, we conclude that tetragonal CuMnAs films are suitable candidate materials for antiferromagnetic spintronics.
  • Tunneling junctions containing no ferromagnetic elements have been fabricated and we show that distinct resistance states can be set by field cooling the devices from above the N\'eel along different orientations. Variations of the resistance up to 10% are found upon field cooling in applied fields of 2T, in-plane or out of plane. Below TN, we found that the metastable states are insensitive to magnetic fields thus constituting a memory element robust against external magnetic fields. Our work provides the demonstration of an electrically readable magnetic memory device, which contains no ferromagnetic elements and stores the information in an antiferromagnetic active layer.
  • The discovery that the interface between two band gap insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 is highly conducting has raised an enormous interest in the field of oxide electronics. The LAlO3/SrTiO3 interface can be tuned using an electric field and switched from a superconducting to an insulating state. Conducting paths in an insulating background can be written applying a voltage with the tip of an atomic force microscope, creating great promise for the development of a new generation of nanoscale electronic devices. However, the mechanism for interface conductivity in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 has remained elusive. The theoretical explanation based on an intrinsic charge transfer (electronic reconstruction) has been strongly challenged by alternative descriptions based on point defects. In this work, thanks to modern aberration-corrected electron probes with atomic-scale spatial resolution, interfacial charge and atomic displacements originating the electric field within the system can be simultaneously measured, yielding unprecedented experimental evidence in favor of an intrinsic electronic reconstruction.
  • We measured the magnetization depth profile of a (La1-xPrx)1-yCayMnO3 (x = 0.60\pm0.04, y = 0.20\pm0.03) film as a function of applied bending stress using polarized neutron reflectometry. From these measurements we obtained a coupling coefficient relating strain to the depth dependent magnetization. We found application of compressive (tensile) bending stress along the magnetic easy axis increases (decreases) the magnetization of the film.
  • We measured the chemical and magnetic depth profiles of a single crystalline (La$_{1-x}$Pr$_x$)$_{1-y}$Ca$_y$MnO$_{3-{\delta}}$ (x = 0.52\pm0.05, y = 0.23\pm0.04, {\delta} = 0.14\pm0.10) film grown on a NdGaO3 substrate using x-ray reflectometry, electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy and polarized neutron reflectometry. Our data indicate that the film exhibits coexistence of different magnetic phases as a function of depth. The magnetic depth profile is correlated with a variation of chemical composition with depth. The thermal hysteresis of ferromagnetic order in the film suggests a first order ferromagnetic transition at low temperatures.
  • Heteroepitaxial superlattices of [YBa2Cu3O7(n)/ La0.67Ca0.33MnO3(m)]x, where n and m are the number of YBCO and LCMO monolayers and x the number of bilayer repetitions, have been grown with pulsed laser deposition on NdGaO3 (110) and Sr0.7La0.3Al0.65Ta0.35O3 (LSAT) (001). These substrates are well lattice matched with YBCO and LCMO and, unlike the commonly used SrTiO3, they do not give rise to complex and uncontrolled strain effects due to structural transitions at low temperature. The growth dynamics and the structure have been studied in-situ with reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and ex-situ with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray diffraction, and neutron reflectometry. The individual layers are found to be flat and continuous over long lateral distances with sharp and coherent interfaces and with a well-defined thickness of the individual layer. The only visible defects are antiphase boundaries in the YBCO layers that originate from perovskite unit cell height steps at the interfaces with the LCMO layers. We also find that the first YBCO monolayer at the interface with LCMO has an unusual growth dynamics and is lacking the CuO chain layer while the subsequent YBCO layers have the regular Y-123 structure. Accordingly, the CuO2 bilayers at both the LCMO/YBCO and the YBCO/LCMO interfaces are lacking one of their neighboring CuO chain layers and thus half of their hole doping reservoir. Nevertheless, from electric transport measurements on asuperlattice with n=2 we obtain evidence that the interfacial CuO2 bilayers remain conducting and even exhibit the onset of a superconducting transition at very low temperature. Finally, we show from dc magnetization and neutron reflectometry measurements that the LCMO layers are strongly ferromagnetic.
  • Using resonant X-ray spectroscopies combined with density functional calculations, we find an asymmetric bi-axial strain-induced $d$-orbital response in ultra-thin films of the correlated metal LaNiO$_3$ which are not accessible in the bulk. The sign of the misfit strain governs the stability of an octahedral "breathing" distortion, which, in turn, produces an emergent charge-ordered ground state with an altered ligand-hole density and bond covalency. Control of this new mechanism opens a pathway to rational orbital engineering, providing a platform for artificially designed Mott materials.
  • BiFeO3 (BFO) multiferroic oxide has a complex phase diagram that can be mapped by appropriately substrate-induced strain in epitaxial films. By using Raman spectroscopy, we conclusively show that films of the so-called supertetragonal T-BFO phase, stabilized under compressive strain, displays a reversible temperature-induced phase transition at about 100\circ, thus close to room temperature.
  • We show that using epitaxial strain and chemical pressure in orthorhombic YMnO3 and Co-substituted (YMn0.95Co0.05O3) thin films, a ferromagnetic response can be gradually introduced and tuned. These results, together with the measured anisotropy of the magnetic response, indicate that the unexpected observation of ferromagnetism in orthorhombic o-RMnO3 (R= Y, Ho, Tb, etc) films originates from strain-driven breaking of the fully compensated magnetic ordering by pushing magnetic moments away from the antiferromagnetic [010] axis. We show that the resulting canting angle and the subsequent ferromagnetic response, gradually increase (up to ~ 1.2\degree) by compression of the unit cell. We will discuss the relevance of these findings, in connection to the magnetoelectric response of orthorhombic manganites.
  • We show which is the nanostructure required in granular Co20(ZrO2)80 thin films to produce an ac response such as the one that is universally observed in a very wide variety of dielectric materials. A bimodal size distribution of Co particles yields randomly competing conductance channels which allow both thermally assisted tunneling through small particles and capacitive conductance among larger particles that are further apart. A model consisting on a simple cubic random resistance-capacitor network describes quantitatively the experimental results as functions of temperature and frequency, and enables the determination of the microscopic parameters controlling the ac response of the samples.
  • We report on the exchange bias between antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric hexagonal YMnO3 epitaxial thin films sandwiched between a metallic electrode (Pt) and a soft ferromagnetic layer (Py). Anisotropic magnetoresistance measurements are performed to monitor the presence of an exchange bias field. When the heteroestructure is biased by an electric field, it turns out that the exchange bias field is suppressed. We discuss the dependence of the observed effect on the amplitude and polarity of the electric field. Particular attention is devoted to the role of current leakage across the ferroelectric layer.
  • We have grown epitaxial thin-films of the orthorhombic phase of YMnO3 oxide on Nb:SrTiO3(001) substrates and their structure, magnetic and dielectric response have been measured. We have found that a substrate-induced strain produces an in-plane compression of the YMnO3 unit cell. The temperature-dependent magnetization curves display a significant ZFC-FC hysteresis at temperatures below the Neel temperature (TN around 40K). The dielectric constant increases gradually (up to 26%) below TN and mimics the ZFC magnetization curve. We argue that these effects are a manifestation of magnetoelectric coupling in thin films and that the magnetic structure of YMnO3 can be controlled by substrate selection.
  • We report on the growth and functional characterization of epitaxial thin films of the multiferroic YMnO3. We show that using Pt as a seed layer on SrTiO3(111) substrates, epitaxial YMnO3 films (0001) textured are obtained. An atomic force microscope has been used to polarize electric domains revealing the ferroelectric nature of the film. When a Permalloy layer is grown on top of the YMnO3(0001) film, clear indications of exchange bias and enhanced coercivity are observed at low temperature. The observation of coexisting antiferromagnetism and electrical polarization suggests that the biferroic character of YMnO3 can be exploited in novel devices.
  • The magnetic exchange bias between epitaxial thin films of the multiferroic (antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric) hexagonal YMnO3 oxide and a soft ferromagnetic (FM) layer is used to couple the magnetic response of the ferromagnetic layer to the magnetic state of the antiferromagnetic one. We will show that biasing the ferroelectric YMnO3 layer by an appropriate electric field allows modifying and controlling the magnetic exchange bias and subsequently the magnetotransport properties of the FM layer. This finding may contribute to pave the way towards a new generation of electric-field controlled spintronics devices.
  • YBa2Cu3O7-x/La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 ferromagnetic/superconducting interfaces are analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy with monolayer resolution. We demonstrate that extensive charge transfer occurs between the manganite and the superconductor, in a manner similar to modulation-doped semiconductors, which explains the reduced critical temperatures of heterostructures. This behavior is not seen with insulating PrBa2Cu3O7 layers. Furthermore, we confirm directly that holes in the YBa2Cu3O7-x are located on the CuO2 planes.
  • We studied the magnetic properties of La$_{0.7}$Ca$_{0.3}$MnO$_3$ / YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-\delta}$ superlattices. Magnetometry showed that with increasing YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-\delta}$ layer thickness the saturation magnetization per La$_{0.7}$Ca$_{0.3}$MnO$_3$ layer decreases. From polarized neutron reflectometry we determined that this magnetization reduction is due to an inhomogenous magnetization depth profile arising from the suppression of magnetization near the La$_{0.7}$Ca$_{0.3}$MnO$_3$ / YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-\delta}$ interface. Electron energy loss spectroscopy indicates an increased 3d band occupation of the Mn atoms in the La$_{0.7}$Ca$_{0.3}$MnO$_3$ layers at the interface. Thus, the suppression of ferromagnetic order at the La$_{0.7}$Ca$_{0.3}$MnO$_3$ / YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-\delta}$ interface is most likely due to charge transfer between the two materials.
  • We report on experiments of spin filtering through ultra-thin single-crystal layers of the insulating and ferromagnetic oxide BiMnO3 (BMO). The spin polarization of the electrons tunneling from a gold electrode through BMO is analyzed with a counter-electrode of the half-metallic oxide La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO). At 3 K we find a 50% change of the tunnel resistances according to whether the magnetizations of BMO and LSMO are parallel or opposite. This effect corresponds to a spin filtering effciency of up to 22%. Our results thus show the potential of complex ferromagnetic insulating oxides for spin filtering and injection.
  • The ability to localize, identify and measure the electronic environment of individual atoms will provide fundamental insights into many issues in materials science, physics and nanotechnology. We demonstrate, using an aberration-corrected scanning transmission microscope, the spectroscopic imaging of single La atoms inside CaTiO3. Dynamical simulations confirm that the spectroscopic information is spatially confined around the scattering atom. Furthermore we show how the depth of the atom within the crystal may be estimated.