• We present a sample of 40 AGN in dwarf galaxies at redshifts $z \lesssim$ 2.4. The galaxies are drawn from the \textit{Chandra} COSMOS-Legacy survey as having stellar masses $10^{7}\leq M_{*}\leq3 \times 10^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$. Most of the dwarf galaxies are star-forming. After removing the contribution from star formation to the X-ray emission, the AGN luminosities of the 40 dwarf galaxies are in the range $L_\mathrm{0.5-10 keV} \sim10^{39} - 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. With 12 sources at $z > 0.5$, our sample constitutes the highest-redshift discovery of AGN in dwarf galaxies. The record-holder is cid\_1192, at $z = 2.39$ and with $L_\mathrm{0.5-10 keV} \sim 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. One of the dwarf galaxies has $M_\mathrm{*} = 6.6 \times 10^{7}$ M$_{\odot}$ and is the least massive galaxy found so far to host an AGN. All the AGN are of type 2 and consistent with hosting intermediate-mass black holes (BHs) with masses $\sim 10^{4} - 10^{5}$ M$_{\odot}$ and typical Eddington ratios $> 1\%$. We also study the evolution, corrected for completeness, of AGN fraction with stellar mass, X-ray luminosity, and redshift in dwarf galaxies out to $z$ = 0.7. We find that the AGN fraction for $10^{9}< M_{*}\leq3 \times 10^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$ and $L_\mathrm{X} \sim 10^{41}-10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$ is $\sim$0.4\% for $z \leq$ 0.3 and that it decreases with X-ray luminosity and decreasing stellar mass. Unlike massive galaxies, the AGN fraction seems to decrease with redshift, suggesting that AGN in dwarf galaxies evolve differently than those in high-mass galaxies. Mindful of potential caveats, the results seem to favor a direct collapse formation mechanism for the seed BHs in the early Universe.
  • Aims: We test the effects of re-orienting jets on the Intra-Cluster Medium in a cool-core galaxy cluster environment. We investigate both the appearance of the X-ray gas cavities and the heating they provide to the cool core. Methods: We test, making use of numerical simulations, four models of periodically re-orienting jets from the central AGN. We keep the jet power and duration fixed and change only the re-orientation angle prescription. We are able to produce realistic X-ray synthetic images and compare them qualitatively to real ones. We show the total energy of the gas and its thermodynamic properties, as well as the energy transfer from the AGN to the ICM. Results: Jets whose re-orientation is substantial (always above $20$ degrees) are able to produce several detached cavities, as opposed to a single, internally connected cavity system. The latter is usually larger and filled by hot plasma of different ages. Synthetic X-ray observations are able to reproduce many observed features, especially resembling real cool-core clusters when the re-orientation angle is constrained between $20$ and $30$ degrees. Jets in those same runs, though inflating smaller cavities, allow for a more efficient heating of the gas, most importantly on scales smaller than $50$ kpc. Re-orienting jets, over hundreds of Myr, can deposit up to $80\%$ of their energy into the ICM, against $60\%$ for jets along a single direction. These jets are finally the only ones in our models reaching an inflow/outflow balance, effectively counteracting cooling flows and keeping the gas' luminosity around the observed values.
  • Feedback by Active Galactic Nuclei is often divided into quasar and radio mode, powered by radiation or radio jets, respectively. Both are fundamental in galaxy evolution, especially in late-type galaxies, as shown by cosmological simulations and observations of jet-ISM interactions in these systems. We compare AGN feedback by radiation and by collimated jets through a suite of simulations, in which a central AGN interacts with a clumpy, fractal galactic disc. We test AGN of $10^{43}$ and $10^{46}$ erg/s, considering jets perpendicular or parallel to the disc. Mechanical jets drive the more powerful outflows, exhibiting stronger mass and momentum coupling with the dense gas, while radiation heats and rarifies the gas more. Radiation and perpendicular jets evolve to be quite similar in outflow properties and effect on the cold ISM, while inclined jets interact more efficiently with all the disc gas, removing the densest $20\%$ in $20$ Myr, and thereby reducing the amount of cold gas available for star formation. All simulations show small-scale inflows of $0.01-0.1$ M$_\odot$/yr, which can easily reach down to the Bondi radius of the central supermassive black hole (especially for radiation and perpendicular jets), implying that AGN modulate their own duty cycle in a feedback/feeding cycle.
  • We investigate the population of high-redshift ($3\leq z < 6$) AGN selected in the two deepest X-ray surveys, the 7 Ms \textit{Chandra} Deep Field-South and 2 Ms \textit{Chandra} Deep Field-North. Their outstanding sensitivity and spectral characterization of faint sources allow us to focus on the sub-$L_*$ regime (log$L_{\mathrm{X}}\lesssim44$), poorly sampled by previous works using shallower data, and the obscured population. Taking fully into account the individual photometric-redshift probability distribution functions, the final sample consists of $\approx102$ X-ray selected AGN at $3\leq z < 6$. The fraction of AGN obscured by column densities log$N_{\mathrm{H}}>23$ is $\sim0.6-0.8$, once incompleteness effects are taken into account, with no strong dependence on redshift or luminosity. We derived the high-redshift AGN number counts down to $F_{\mathrm{0.5-2\,keV}}=7\times10^{-18}\,\mathrm{erg\,cm^{-2}\,s^{-1}}$, extending previous results to fainter fluxes, especially at $z>4$. We put the tightest constraints to date on the low-luminosity end of AGN luminosity function at high redshift. The space-density, in particular, declines at $z>3$ at all luminosities, with only a marginally steeper slope for low-luminosity AGN. By comparing the evolution of the AGN and galaxy densities, we suggest that such a decline at high luminosities is mainly driven by the underlying galaxy population, while at low luminosities there are hints of an intrinsic evolution of the parameters driving nuclear activity. Also, the black-hole accretion rate density and star-formation rate density, which are usually found to evolve similarly at $z\lesssim3$, appear to diverge at higher redshifts.
  • Using a suite of three large cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, Horizon-AGN, Horizon-noAGN (no AGN feedback) and Horizon-DM (no baryons), we investigate how a typical sub-grid model for AGN feedback affects the evolution of the inner density profiles of massive dark matter haloes and galaxies. Based on direct object-to-object comparisons, we find that the integrated inner mass and density slope differences between objects formed in these three simulations (hereafter, H_AGN, H_noAGN and H_DM) significantly evolve with time. More specifically, at high redshift (z~5), the mean central density profiles of H_AGN and H_noAGN dark matter haloes tend to be much steeper than their H_DM counterparts owing to the rapidly growing baryonic component and ensuing adiabatic contraction. By z~1.5, these mean halo density profiles in H_AGN have flattened, pummelled by powerful AGN activity ("quasar mode"): the integrated inner mass difference gaps with H_noAGN haloes have widened, and those with H_DM haloes have narrowed. Fast forward 9.5 billion years, down to z=0, and the trend reverses: H_AGN halo mean density profiles drift back to a more cusped shape as AGN feedback efficiency dwindles ("radio mode"), and the gaps in integrated central mass difference with H_noAGN and H_DM close and broaden respectively. On the galaxy side, the story differs noticeably. Averaged stellar profile central densities and inner slopes are monotonically reduced by AGN activity as a function of cosmic time, resulting in better agreement with local observations. As both dark matter and stellar inner density profiles respond quite sensitively to the presence of a central AGN, there is hope that future observational determinations of these quantities can be used constrain AGN feedback models.
  • The coeval AGN and galaxy evolution and the observed local relations between SMBHs and galaxy properties suggest some connection or feedback between SMBH growth and galaxy build-up. We looked for correlations between properties of X-ray detected AGN and their FIR detected host galaxies, to find quantitative evidences for this connection, highly debated in the latest years. We exploit the rich multi-wavelength data set available in the COSMOS field for a large sample (692 sources) of AGN and their hosts, in the redshift range $0.1<z<4$. We use X-ray data to select AGN and determine their properties (intrinsic luminosity and nuclear obscuration), and broad-band SED fitting to derive host galaxy properties (stellar mass $M_*$ and star formation rate SFR). We find that the AGN 2-10 keV luminosity ($L_{\rm X}$) and the host $8-1000~\mu m$ star formation luminosity ($L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$) are significantly correlated. However, the average host $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$ has a flat distribution in bins of AGN $L_{\rm X}$, while the average AGN $L_{\rm X}$ increases in bins of host $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$, with logarithmic slope of $\sim0.7$, in the redshifts range $0.4<z<1.2$. We also discuss the comparison between the distribution of these two quantities and the predictions from hydro-dynamical simulations. Finally we find that the average column density ($N_H$) shows a positive correlation with the host $M_*$, at all redshifts, but not with the SFR (or $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm SF}$). This translates into a negative correlation with specific SFR. Our results are in agreement with the idea that BH accretion and SF rates are correlated, but occur with different variability time scales. The presence of a positive correlation between $N_H$ and host $M_*$ suggests that the X-ray $N_H$ is not entirely due to the circum-nuclear obscuring torus, but may also include a contribution from the host galaxy.
  • The observed massive end of the local galaxy stellar mass function is steeper than its predicted dark matter (DM) halo counterpart in the standard $\Lambda $CDM paradigm. We investigate how active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback can account for such a reduction in the stellar content of massive galaxies, through an influence on the gas content of their interstellar (ISM) and circum-galactic medium (CGM). We isolate the impact of AGNs by comparing two simulations from the HORIZON suite, which are identical except that one includes super massive black holes (SMBH) and related feedback. This allows us to cross-identify individual galaxies between these simulations and quantify the effect of AGN feedback on their properties, such as stellar mass and gas outflows. We find that the most massive galaxies ($ \rm M_{*} \geq 3 \times 10^{11} M_\odot $) are quenched to the extent that their stellar masses decrease by about 80% at $z=0$. More generally, SMBHs affect their host halo through a combination of outflows that reduce their baryonic mass, particularly for galaxies in the mass range $ \rm 10^9 M_\odot \leq M_{*} \leq 10^{11} M_\odot $, and a disruption of central gas inflows, which limits in-situ star formation, particularly massive galaxies with $ \rm M_{*} \approx10^{11} M_\odot $. As a result of these processes, net gas inflows onto massive galaxies drop by up to 70%. Finally, we measure a redshift evolution in the stellar mass ratio of twin galaxies with and without AGN feedback, with galaxies of a given stellar mass showing stronger signs of quenching earlier on. This evolution is driven by a progressive flattening of the $\rm M_{SMBH}-M_* $ relation for galaxies with $\rm M_{*} \leq 10^{10} M_\odot $ as redshift decreases, which translates into smaller SBMHs being harboured by galaxies of any fixed stellar mass, and indicates stronger AGN feedback at higher redshift.
  • Observations of quasars at $ z > 6$ suggest the presence of black holes with a few times $\rm 10^9 ~M_{\odot}$. Numerous models have been proposed to explain their existence including the direct collapse which provides massive seeds of $\rm 10^5~M_{\odot}$. The isothermal direct collapse requires a strong Lyman-Werner flux to quench $\rm H_2$ formation in massive primordial halos. In this study, we explore the impact of trace amounts of metals and dust enrichment. We perform three dimensional cosmological simulations for two halos of $\rm > 10^7~M_{\odot}$ with $\rm Z/Z_{\odot}= 10^{-4}-10^{-6}$ illuminated by an intense Lyman Werner flux of $\rm J_{21}=10^5$. Our results show that initially the collapse proceeds isothermally with $\rm T \sim 8000$ K but dust cooling becomes effective at densities of $\rm 10^{8}-10^{12} ~cm^{-3}$ and brings the gas temperature down to a few 100-1000 K for $\rm Z/Z_{\odot} \geq 10^{-6}$. No gravitationally bound clumps are found in $\rm Z/Z_{\odot} \leq 10^{-5}$ cases by the end of our simulations in contrast to the case with $\rm Z/Z_{\odot} = 10^{-4}$. Large inflow rates of $\rm \geq 0.1~M_{\odot}/yr$ are observed for $\rm Z/Z_{\odot} \leq 10^{-5}$ similar to a zero-metallicity case while for $\rm Z/Z_{\odot} = 10^{-4}$ the inflow rate starts to decline earlier due to the dust cooling and fragmentation. For given large inflow rates a central star of $\rm \sim 10^4~M_{\odot}$ may form for $\rm Z/Z_{\odot} \leq 10^{-5}$.
  • Supermassive black holes are not only common in the present-day galaxies, but billion solar masses black holes also powered $z\geq 6$ quasars. One efficient way to form such black holes is the collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud into a so-called direct collapse black hole. The main requirement for this scenario is the presence of large accretion rates of $\rm \geq 0.1~M_{\odot}/yr$ to form a supermassive star. It is not yet clear how and under what conditions such accretion rates can be obtained. The prime aim of this work is to determine the mass accretion rates under non-isothermal collapse conditions. We perform high resolution cosmological simulations for three primordial halos of a few times $\rm 10^7~M_{\odot}$ illuminated by an external UV flux, $\rm J_{21}=100-1000$. We find that a rotationally supported structure of about parsec size is assembled, with an aspect ratio between $\rm 0.25 - 1$ depending upon the thermodynamical properties. Rotational support, however, does not halt collapse, and mass inflow rates of $\rm \sim 0.1~M_{\odot}/yr$ can be obtained in the presence of even a moderate UV background flux of strength $\rm J_{21} \geq 100$. To assess whether such large accretion rates can be maintained over longer time scales, we employed sink particles, confirming the persistence of accretion rates of $\rm \sim 0.1~M_{\odot}/yr$. We propose that complete isothermal collapse and molecular hydrogen suppression may not always be necessary to form supermassive stars, precursors of black hole seeds. Sufficiently high inflow rates can be obtained for UV flux $\rm J_{21}=500-1000$, at least for some cases. This value brings the estimate of the abundance of direct collapse black hole seeds closer to that high redshift quasars.
  • Building on the experience of the high-resolution community with the suite of VLT high-resolution spectrographs, which has been tremendously successful, we outline here the (science) case for a high-fidelity, high-resolution spectrograph with wide wavelength coverage at the E-ELT. Flagship science drivers include: the study of exo-planetary atmospheres with the prospect of the detection of signatures of life on rocky planets; the chemical composition of planetary debris on the surface of white dwarfs; the spectroscopic study of protoplanetary and proto-stellar disks; the extension of Galactic archaeology to the Local Group and beyond; spectroscopic studies of the evolution of galaxies with samples that, unlike now, are no longer restricted to strongly star forming and/or very massive galaxies; the unraveling of the complex roles of stellar and AGN feedback; the study of the chemical signatures imprinted by population III stars on the IGM during the epoch of reionization; the exciting possibility of paradigm-changing contributions to fundamental physics. The requirements of these science cases can be met by a stable instrument with a spectral resolution of R~100,000 and broad, simultaneous spectral coverage extending from 370nm to 2500nm. Most science cases do not require spatially resolved information, and can be pursued in seeing-limited mode, although some of them would benefit by the E-ELT diffraction limited resolution. Some multiplexing would also be beneficial for some of the science cases. (Abridged)
  • We constrain the total accreted mass density in supermassive black holes at z>6, inferred via the upper limit derived from the integrated X-ray emission from a sample of photometrically selected galaxy candidates. Studying galaxies obtained from the deepest Hubble Space Telescope images combined with the Chandra 4 Msec observations of the Chandra Deep Field South, we achieve the most restrictive constraints on total black hole growth in the early Universe. We estimate an accreted mass density <1000Mo Mpc^-3 at z~6, significantly lower than the previous predictions from some existing models of early black hole growth and earlier prior observations. These results place interesting constraints on early black growth and mass assembly by accretion and imply one or more of the following: (1) only a fraction of the luminous galaxies at this epoch contain active black holes; (2) most black hole growth at early epochs happens in dusty and/or less massive - as yet undetected - host galaxies; (3) there is a significant fraction of low-z interlopers in the galaxy sample; (4) early black hole growth is radiatively inefficient, heavily obscured and/or is due to black hole mergers as opposed to accretion or (5) the bulk of the black hole growth occurs at late times. All of these possibilities have important implications for our understanding of high redshift seed formation models.
  • The eLISA Consortium: P. Amaro Seoane, S. Aoudia, H. Audley, G. Auger, S. Babak, J. Baker, E. Barausse, S. Barke, M. Bassan, V. Beckmann, M. Benacquista, P. L. Bender, E. Berti, P. Binétruy, J. Bogenstahl, C. Bonvin, D. Bortoluzzi, N. C. Brause, J. Brossard, S. Buchman, I. Bykov, J. Camp, C. Caprini, A. Cavalleri, M. Cerdonio, G. Ciani, M. Colpi, G. Congedo, J. Conklin, N. Cornish, K. Danzmann, G. de Vine, D. DeBra, M. Dewi Freitag, L. Di Fiore, M. Diaz Aguilo, I. Diepholz, R. Dolesi, M. Dotti, G. Fernández Barranco, L. Ferraioli, V. Ferroni, N. Finetti, E. Fitzsimons, J. Gair, F. Galeazzi, A. Garcia, O. Gerberding, L. Gesa, D. Giardini, F. Gibert, C. Grimani, P. Groot, F. Guzman Cervantes, Z. Haiman, H. Halloin, G. Heinzel, M. Hewitson, C. Hogan, D. Holz, A. Hornstrup, D. Hoyland, C.D. Hoyle, M. Hueller, S. Hughes, P. Jetzer, V. Kalogera, N. Karnesis, M. Kilic, C. Killow, W. Klipstein, E. Kochkina, N. Korsakova, A. Krolak, S. Larson, M. Lieser, T. Littenberg, J. Livas, I. Lloro, D. Mance, P. Madau, P. Maghami, C. Mahrdt, T. Marsh, I. Mateos, L. Mayer, D. McClelland, K. McKenzie, S. McWilliams, S. Merkowitz, C. Miller, S. Mitryk, J. Moerschell, S. Mohanty, A. Monsky, G. Mueller, V. Müller, G. Nelemans, D. Nicolodi, S. Nissanke, M. Nofrarias, K. Numata, F. Ohme, M. Otto, M. Perreur-Lloyd, A. Petiteau, E. S. Phinney, E. Plagnol, S. Pollack, E. Porter, P. Prat, A. Preston, T. Prince, J. Reiche, D. Richstone, D. Robertson, E. M. Rossi, S. Rosswog, L. Rubbo, A. Ruiter, J. Sanjuan, B.S. Sathyaprakash, S. Schlamminger, B. Schutz, D. Schütze, A. Sesana, D. Shaddock, S. Shah, B. Sheard, C. F. Sopuerta, A. Spector, R. Spero, R. Stanga, R. Stebbins, G. Stede, F. Steier, T. Sumner, K.-X. Sun, A. Sutton, T. Tanaka, D. Tanner, I. Thorpe, M. Tröbs, M. Tinto, H.-B. Tu, M. Vallisneri, D. Vetrugno, S. Vitale, M. Volonteri, V. Wand, Y. Wang, G. Wanner, H. Ward, B. Ware, P. Wass, W. J. Weber, Y. Yu, N. Yunes, P. Zweifel
    May 24, 2013 gr-qc, astro-ph.CO
    The last century has seen enormous progress in our understanding of the Universe. We know the life cycles of stars, the structure of galaxies, the remnants of the big bang, and have a general understanding of how the Universe evolved. We have come remarkably far using electromagnetic radiation as our tool for observing the Universe. However, gravity is the engine behind many of the processes in the Universe, and much of its action is dark. Opening a gravitational window on the Universe will let us go further than any alternative. Gravity has its own messenger: Gravitational waves, ripples in the fabric of spacetime. They travel essentially undisturbed and let us peer deep into the formation of the first seed black holes, exploring redshifts as large as z ~ 20, prior to the epoch of cosmic re-ionisation. Exquisite and unprecedented measurements of black hole masses and spins will make it possible to trace the history of black holes across all stages of galaxy evolution, and at the same time constrain any deviation from the Kerr metric of General Relativity. eLISA will be the first ever mission to study the entire Universe with gravitational waves. eLISA is an all-sky monitor and will offer a wide view of a dynamic cosmos using gravitational waves as new and unique messengers to unveil The Gravitational Universe. It provides the closest ever view of the early processes at TeV energies, has guaranteed sources in the form of verification binaries in the Milky Way, and can probe the entire Universe, from its smallest scales around singularities and black holes, all the way to cosmological dimensions.
  • We place firm upper limits on the global accretion history of massive black holes at z>5 from the recently measured unresolved fraction of the cosmic X-ray background. The maximum allowed unresolved intensity observed at 1.5 keV implies a maximum accreted-mass density onto massive black holes of rho_acc < 1.4E4 M_sun Mpc^{-3} for z>5. Considering the contribution of lower-z AGNs, the value reduces to rho_acc < 0.66E4 M_sun Mpc^{-3}. The tension between the need for the efficient and rapid accretion required by the observation of massive black holes already in place at z>7 and the strict upper limit on the accreted mass derived from the X-ray background may indicate that black holes are rare in high redshift galaxies, or that accretion is efficient only for black holes hosted by rare galaxies.
  • Massive black holes in galactic nuclei vary their mass M and spin vector J due to accretion. In this study we relax, for the first time, the assumption that accretion can be either chaotic, i.e. when the accretion episodes are randomly and isotropically oriented, or coherent, i.e. when they occur all in a preferred plane. Instead, we consider different degrees of anisotropy in the fueling, never confining to accretion events on a fixed direction. We follow the black hole growth evolving contemporarily mass, spin modulus a and spin direction. We discover the occurrence of two regimes. An early phase (M <~ 10 million solar masses) in which rapid alignment of the black hole spin direction to the disk angular momentum in each single episode leads to erratic changes in the black hole spin orientation and at the same time to large spins (a ~ 0.8). A second phase starts when the black hole mass increases above >~ 10 million solar masses and the accretion disks carry less mass and angular momentum relatively to the hole. In the absence of a preferential direction the black holes tend to spin-down in this phase. However, when a modest degree of anisotropy in the fueling process (still far from being coherent) is present, the black hole spin can increase up to a ~ 1 for very massive black holes (M >~ 100 million solar masses), and its direction is stable over the many accretion cycles. We discuss the implications that our results have in the realm of the observations of black hole spin and jet orientations.
  • We present results of simulations aimed at tracing the formation of nuclear star clusters (NCs) and black hole (BH) seeds, in a cosmological context. We focus on two mechanisms for the formation of BHs at high redshifts: as end-products of (1) Population III stars in metal free halos, and of (2) runaway stellar collisions in metal poor NCs. Our model tracks the chemical, radiative and mechanical feedback of stars on the baryonic component of the evolving halos. This procedure allows us to evaluate when and where the conditions for BH formation are met, and to trace the emergence of BH seeds arising from the dynamical channel, in a cosmological context. BHs start to appear already at z~30 as remnants of Population III stars. The efficiency of this mechanism begins decreasing once feedbacks become increasingly important. Around redshift z~15, BHs mostly form in the centre of mildly metal enriched halos inside dense NCs. The seed BHs that form along the two pathways have at birth a mass around 100-1000M\odot. The occupation fraction of BHs is a function of both halo mass and mass growth rate: at a given z, heavier and faster growing halos have a higher chance to form a native BH, or to acquire an inherited BH via merging of another system. With decreasing z, the probability of finding a BH shifts toward progressively higher mass halo intervals. This is due to the fact that, at later cosmic times, low mass systems rarely form a seed, and already formed BHs are deposited into larger mass systems due to hierarchical mergers. Our model predict that at z=0, all halos above 10^11M\odot should host a BH (in agreement with observational results), most probably inherited during their lifetime. Halos less massive then 10^9M\odot have a higher probability to host a native BH, but their occupation fraction decreases below 10%.
  • The Suzaku AGN Spin Survey is designed to determine the supermassive black hole spin in six nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) via deep Suzaku stares, thereby giving us our first glimpse of the local black hole spin distribution. Here, we present an analysis of the first target to be studied under the auspices of this Key Project, the Seyfert galaxy NGC 3783. Despite complexity in the spectrum arising from a multi-component warm absorber, we detect and study relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk. Assuming that the X-ray reflection is from the surface of a flat disk around a Kerr black hole, and that no X-ray reflection occurs within the general relativistic radius of marginal stability, we determine a lower limit on the black hole spin of a > 0.88 (99% confidence). We examine the robustness of this result to the assumption of the analysis, and present a brief discussion of spin-related selection biases that might affect flux-limited samples of AGN.
  • LISA might detect gravitational waves from mergers of massive black hole binaries strongly lensed by intervening galaxies (Sereno et al. 2010). The detection of multiple gravitational lensing events would provide a new tool for cosmography. Constraints on cosmological parameters could be placed by exploiting either lensing statistics of strongly lensed sources or time delay measurements of lensed gravitational wave signals. These lensing methods do not need the measurement of the redshifts of the sources and the identification of their electromagnetic counterparts. They would extend cosmological probes to redshift z <= 10 and are then complementary to other lower or higher redshift tests, such as type Ia supernovae or cosmic microwave background. The accuracy of lensing tests strongly depends on the formation history of the merging binaries, and the related number of total detectable multiple images. Lensing amplification might also help to find the host galaxies. Any measurement of the source redshifts would allow to exploit the distance-redshift test in combination with lensing methods. Time-delay analyses might measure the Hubble parameter H_0 with accuracy of >= 10 km s^{-1}Mpc^{-1}. With prior knowledge of H_0, lensing statistics and time delays might constrain the dark matter density (delta Omega_M >= 0.08, due to parameter degeneracy). Inclusion of our methods with other available orthogonal techniques might significantly reduce the uncertainty contours for Omega_M and the dark energy equation of state.
  • We discuss strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from merging of massive black hole binaries in the context of the LISA mission. Detection of multiple events would provide invaluable information on competing theories of gravity, evolution and formation of structures and, with complementary observations, constraints on H_0 and other cosmological parameters. Most of the optical depth for lensing is provided by intervening massive galactic halos, for which wave optics effects are negligible. Probabilities to observe multiple events are sizable for a broad range of formation histories. For the most optimistic models, up to 4 multiple events with a signal to noise ratio >= 8 are expected in a 5-year mission. Chances are significant even for conservative models with either light (<= 60%) or heavy (<= 40%) seeds. Due to lensing amplification, some intrinsically too faint signals are brought over threshold (<= 2 per year).
  • In this proceeding we explore a pathway to radio-loudness under the hypothesis that retrograde accretion onto giant spinning black holes leads to the launch of powerful jets, as seen in radio loud QSOs and recently in LAT/Fermi and BAT/Swift Blazars. Counter-rotation of the accretion disc relative to the BH spin is here associated to gas-poor galaxy mergers progenitors of giant (missing-light) ellipticals. The occurrence of retrograde accretion enters as unifying element that may account for the radio-loudness/galaxy morphology dichotomy observed in AGN.
  • As massive black holes (MBHs) grow from lower-mass seeds, it is natural to expect that a leftover population of progenitor MBHs should also exist in the present universe. Dwarf galaxies undergo a quiet merger history, and as a result, we expect that dwarfs observed in the local Universe retain some `memory' of the original seed mass distribution. Consequently, the properties of MBHs in nearby dwarf galaxies may provide clean indicators of the efficiency of MBH formation. In order to examine the properties of MBHs in dwarf galaxies, we evolve different MBH populations within a Milky Way halo from high-redshift to today. We consider two plausible MBH formation mechanisms: `massive seeds' formed via gas-dynamical instabilities and a Population III remnant seed model. `Massive seeds' have larger masses than PopIII remnants, but form in rarer hosts. We dynamically evolve all halos merging with the central system, taking into consideration how the interaction modifies the satellites, stripping their outer mass layers. We compute different properties of the MBH population hosted in these satellites. We find that for the most part MBHs retain the original mass, thus providing a clear indication of what the properties of the seeds were. We derive the black hole occupation fraction (BHOF) of the satellite population at z=0. MBHs generated as `massive seeds' have large masses that would favour their identification, but their typical BHOF is always below 40 per cent and decreases to less than per cent for observed dwarf galaxy sizes. In contrast, Population III remnants have a higher BHOF, but their masses have not grown much since formation, inhibiting their detection.
  • Galactic nuclei host central massive objects either in the form of supermassive black holes or nuclear stellar clusters. Recent investigations have shown that both components co-exist in at least a few galaxies. In this paper we explore the possibility of a connection between nuclear star clusters and black holes that establishes at the moment of their formation. We here model the evolution of high redshift discs, hosted in dark matter halos with virial temperatures 10^4 K, whose gas has been polluted with metals just above the critical metallicity for fragmentation. A nuclear cluster forms as a result of a central starburst from gas inflowing from the unstable disc. The nuclear stellar cluster provides a suitable environment for the formation of a black hole seed, ensuing from runaway collisions among the most massive stars. Typical masses for the nuclear stellar clusters at the time of black hole formation (z~10) are inthe range 10^4-10^6 solar masses and have half mass radii < 0.5 pc. The black holes forming in these dense, high redshift clusters can have masses in the range ~300-2000 solar masses.
  • Using high resolution hydrodynamical simulations, we explore the spin evolution of massive dual black holes orbiting inside a circumnuclear disc, relic of a gas-rich galaxy merger. The black holes spiral inwards from initially eccentric co or counter-rotating coplanar orbits relative to the disc's rotation, and accrete gas that is carrying a net angular momentum. As the black hole mass grows, its spin changes in strength and direction due to its gravito-magnetic coupling with the small-scale accretion disc. We find that the black hole spins loose memory of their initial orientation, as accretion torques suffice to align the spins with the angular momentum of their orbit on a short timescale (<1-2 Myr). A residual off-set in the spin direction relative to the orbital angular momentum remains, at the level of <10 degrees for the case of a cold disc, and <30 degrees for a warmer disc. Alignment in a cooler disc is more effective due to the higher coherence of the accretion flow near each black hole that reflects the large-scale coherence of the disc's rotation. If the massive black holes coalesce preserving the spin directions set after formation of a Keplerian binary, the relic black hole resulting from their coalescence receives a relatively small gravitational recoil. The distribution of recoil velocities inferred from a simulated sample of massive black hole binaries has median <70 km/s much smaller than the median resulting from an isotropic distribution of spins.
  • We investigate the theoretical expectations for detections of supermassive binary black holes that can be identified as sub-parsec luminous quasars. To-date, only two candidates have been selected in a sample comprising 17,500 sources selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog at z<0.70 (Boroson & Lauer 2009) In this Letter, we use models of assembly and growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in hierarchical cosmologies to study the statistics and observability of binary quasars at sub-parsec separations. Our goal is twofold: (1) test if such a scarce number of binaries is consistent with theoretical prediction of SMBH merger rates, and (2) provide additional predictions at higher redshifts, and at lower flux levels. We determine the cumulative number of expected binaries in a complete, volume limited sample. Motivated by Boroson & Lauer (2009), we apply the SDSS Quasar luminosity cut (M_i<-22) to our theoretical sample, deriving an upper limit to the observable binary fraction. We find that sub-parsec quasar binaries are intrinsically rare. Our best models predict ~0.01 deg^-2 sub-parsec binary quasars with separations below ~10^4 Schwarzschild radii (v_orb>2000 km/s) at z<0.7, which represent a fraction ~6x10^-4 of unabsorbed quasars in our theoretical sample. In a complete sample of ~10,000 sources, we therefore predict an upper limit of ~10 sub-parsec binary quasars. The number of binaries increases rapidly with increasing redshift. The decreasing lifetime with SMBH binary mass suggests that lowering the luminosity threshold does not lead to a significant increase in the number of detectable sub-parsec binary quasars.
  • In this paper, we explore the gravitomagnetic interaction of a black hole (BH) with a misaligned accretion disc to study BH spin precession and alignment jointly with BH mass and spin parameter evolution, under the assumption that the disc is continually fed, in its outer region, by matter with angular momentum fixed on a given direction. We develop an iterative scheme based on the adiabatic approximation to study the BH-disc coevolution: in this approach, the accretion disc transits through a sequence of quasi-steady warped states (Bardeen-Petterson effect) and interacts with the BH until the BH spin aligns with the outer angular momentum direction. For a BH aligning with a co-rotating disc, the fractional increase in mass is typically less than a few percent, while the spin modulus can increase up to a few tens of percent. The alignment timescale is between ~ 100 thousands and ~ 1 millions years for a maximally rotating BH accreting at the Eddington rate. BH-disc alignment from an initially counter-rotating disc tends to be more efficient compared to the specular co-rotating case due to the asymmetry seeded in the Kerr metric: counter-rotating matter carries a larger and opposite angular momentum when crossing the innermost stable orbit, so that the spin modulus decreases faster and so the relative inclination angle.
  • In this Letter we explore the hypothesis that the quasar SDSSJ092712.65+294344.0 is hosting a massive black hole binary embedded in a circumbinary disc. The lightest, secondary black hole is active, and gas orbiting around it is responsible for the blue-shifted broad emission lines with velocity off-set of 2650 km/s, relative to the galaxy rest frame. As the tidal interaction of the binary with the outer disc is expected to excavate a gap, the blue-shifted narrow emission lines are consistent with being emitted from the low-density inhomogeneous gas of the hollow region. From the observations we infer a binary mass ratio q ~ 0.3, a mass for the primary of M1 ~ 2 billion Msun and a semi-major axis of 0.34 pc, corresponding to an orbital period of 370 years. We use the results of cosmological merger trees to estimate the likely-hood of observing SDSSJ092712.65+294344.0 as recoiling black hole or as a binary. We find that the binary hypothesis is preferred being one hundred times more probable than the ejection hypothesis. If SDSSJ092712.65+294344.0 hosts a binary, it would be the one closest massive black hole binary system ever discovered.