• We report the discovery of two hot Jupiters orbiting the stars EPIC229426032 and EPIC246067459. We used photometry data from Campaign 11 and 12 of the Kepler (K2) Mission, as well as radial velocity data obtained using the HARPS, FEROS, and CORALIE spectrographs. EPIC229426032 b and EPIC246067459 b have masses of $1.36^{+0.10}_{-0.10}$ and $0.86^{+0.13}_{-0.12}\,R_{\mathrm{Jup}}$, radii of $1.63^{+0.07}_{-0.08}$ and $1.30^{+0.15}_{-0.14}\,M_{\mathrm{Jup}}$, and are orbiting their host stars in 2.18 and 3.2 day orbits, respectively. The large radius of EPIC229426032 b leads us to conclude that this corresponds to a highly inflated hot Jupiter. EPIC2460674559 b has a radius consistent with theoretical models, considering the high incident flux falling on the planet. Both of these discoveries represent excellent laboratories to study the physics of planetary atmospheres, and the factors playing a role in planetary infation, as well as planet formation and evolution. EPIC229426032 b is particularly favourable for follow-up studies, since not only is it very inflated, but it also orbits a relatively bright star ($V = 11.6$).
  • LoTr 5 is a planetary nebula with an unusual long-period binary central star. As far as we know, the pair consists of a rapidly rotating G-type star and a hot star, which is responsible for the ionization of the nebula. The rotation period of the G-type star is 5.95 days and the orbital period of the binary is now known to be $\sim$2700 days, one of the longest in central star of planetary nebulae. The spectrum of the G central star shows a complex H$\alpha$ double-peaked profile which varies with very short time scales, also reported in other central stars of planetary nebulae and whose origin is still unknown. We present new radial velocity observations of the central star which allow us to confirm the orbital period for the long-period binary and discuss the possibility of a third component in the system at $\sim$129 days to the G star. This is complemented with the analysis of archival light curves from SuperWASP, ASAS and OMC. From the spectral fitting of the G-type star, we obtain a effective temperature of $T_{\rm eff}$ = 5410$\pm$250 K and surface gravity of $\log g$ = 2.7$\pm$0.5, consistent with both giant and subgiant stars. We also present a detailed analysis of the H$\alpha$ double-peaked profile and conclude that it does not present correlation with the rotation period and that the presence of an accretion disk via Roche lobe overflow is unlikely.
  • Although the majority of radial velocity detected planets have been found orbiting solar-type stars, a fraction of them have been discovered around giant stars. These planetary systems have revealed different orbital properties when compared to solar-type stars companions. In particular, radial velocity surveys have shown that there is a lack of giant planets in close-in orbits around giant stars, in contrast to the known population of hot-Jupiters orbiting solar-type stars. The reason of this distinctive feature in the semimajor-axis distribution has been theorized to be the result of the stellar evolution and/or due to the effect of a different formation/evolution scenario for planets around intermediate-mass stars. However, in the past few years, a handful of transiting short-period planets (P$\lesssim$ 10 days) have been found around giant stars, thanks to the high precision photometric data obtained initially by the Kepler mission, and later by its two-wheels extension K2. These new discoveries, have allowed us for the first time to study the orbital properties and physical parameters of these intriguing and elusive sub-stellar companions. In this paper we report on an independent discovery of a transiting planet in field 10 of the K2 mission, also reported recently by Grunblatt et al. (2017). The main orbital parameters of EPIC\,228754001\,$b$, obtained with all the available data for the system, are the following: $P$ = 9.1708 $\pm$ 0.0025 $d$, $e$ = 0.290 $\pm$ 0.049, Mp = 0.495 $\pm$ 0.007 Mjup \,and Rp = 1.089 $\pm$ 0.006 Rjup. This is the fifth known planet orbiting any giant star with $a < 0.1$, and the most eccentric one among them, making EPIC\,228754001\,$b$ a very interesting object.
  • We present a long-term programme for timing the eclipses of white dwarfs in close binaries to measure apparent and/or real variations in their orbital periods. Our programme includes 67 close binaries, both detached and semi-detached and with M-dwarfs, K-dwarfs, brown dwarfs or white dwarfs secondaries. In total, we have observed more than 650 white dwarf eclipses. We use this sample to search for orbital period variations and aim to identify the underlying cause of these variations. We find that the probability of observing orbital period variations increases significantly with the observational baseline. In particular, all binaries with baselines exceeding 10 yrs, with secondaries of spectral type K2 -- M5.5, show variations in the eclipse arrival times that in most cases amount to several minutes. In addition, among those with baselines shorter than 10 yrs, binaries with late spectral type (>M6), brown dwarf or white dwarf secondaries appear to show no orbital period variations. This is in agreement with the so-called Applegate mechanism, which proposes that magnetic cycles in the secondary stars can drive variability in the binary orbits. We also present new eclipse times of NN Ser, which are still compatible with the previously published circumbinary planetary system model, although only with the addition of a quadratic term to the ephemeris. Finally, we conclude that we are limited by the relatively short observational baseline for many of the binaries in the eclipse timing programme, and therefore cannot yet draw robust conclusions about the cause of orbital period variations in evolved, white dwarf binaries.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars (sdBs) with massive compact companions such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, or stellar-mass black holes. In a supplementary programme we obtained time-resolved spectroscopy of known hot subdwarf binary candidates. Here we present orbital solutions of eight close sdB binaries with orbital periods ranging from 0.1 to 10 days, which allow us to derive lower limits on the masses of their companions. Additionally, a dedicated photometric follow-up campaign was conducted to obtain light curves of the reflection-effect binary HS 2043+0615. We are able to constrain the most likely nature of the companions in all cases but one, making use of information derived from photometry and spectroscopy. Four sdBs have white dwarf companions, while another three are orbited by low-mass main sequence stars of spectral type M.
  • We carried out an extensive observational study of the Slowly Pulsating B (SPB) star, HD 25558. The ~2000 spectra obtained at different observatories, the ground-based and MOST satellite light curves revealed that this object is a double-lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of about 9 years. The observations do not allow the inference of an orbital solution. We determined the physical parameters of the components, and found that both lie within the SPB instability strip. Accordingly, both show line-profile variations due to stellar pulsations. Eleven independent frequencies were identified in the data. All the frequencies were attributed to one of the two components based on Pixel-by-pixel variability analysis of the line profiles. Spectroscopic and photometric mode identification was also performed for the frequencies of both stars. These results suggest that the inclination and rotation of the two components are rather different. The primary is a slow rotator with ~6 d period, seen at ~60 deg inclination, while the secondary rotates fast with ~1.2 d period, and is seen at ~20 inclination. Spectropolarimetric measurements revealed that the secondary component has a magnetic field with at least a few hundred Gauss strength, while no magnetic field can be detected in the primary.
  • To add to the growing collection of well-studied double periodic variables (DPVs) we have carried out the first spectroscopic and photometric analysis of the eclipsing binary DQ Velorum to obtain its main physical stellar and orbital parameters. Combining spectroscopic and photometric observations that cover several orbital cycles allows us to estimate the stellar properties of the binary components and the orbital parameters. We also searched for circumstellar material around the more massive star. We separated DQ Velorum composite spectra and measured radial velocities with an iterative method for double spectroscopic binaries. We obtained the radial velocity curves and calculated the spectroscopic mass ratio. We compared our single-lined spectra with a grid of synthetic spectra and estimated the temperature of the stars. We modeled the V-band light curve with a fitting method based on the simplex algorithm, which includes an accretion disc. To constrain the main stellar parameters we fixed the mass ratio and donor temperature to the values obtained by our spectroscopic analysis. We obtain donor and gainer masses, the radii, and temperatures for the stellar components. We find that DQ Vel is a semi-detached system consisting of a B3V gainer and an A1III donor star plus an extended accretion disc around the gainer. The disc is filling 89% of the gainer Roche lobe and it has a concave shape that is thicker at its edge than at its centre. We find a significant sub-orbital frequency of 0.19 d^{-1} in the residuals of the V-band light curve, which we interpret as a pulsation of an slowly pulsating B-type (SPB) of a gainer star. We also estimate the distance to the binary (3.1 kpc) using the absolute radii, apparent magnitudes, and effective temperatures of the components found in our study.
  • Six O-type stars were observed continuously by the CoRoT satellite during a 34.3-day run. The unprecedented quality of the data allows us to detect even low-amplitude stellar pulsations in some of these stars (HD 46202 and the binaries HD 46149 and Plaskett's star). These cover both opacity-driven modes and solar-like stochastic oscillations, both of importance to the asteroseismological modelling of O stars. Additional effects can be seen in the CoRoT light curves, such as binarity and rotational modulation. Some of the hottest O-type stars (HD 46223, HD 46150 and HD 46966) are dominated by the presence of red-noise: we speculate that this is related to a sub-surface convection zone.
  • The O9V star HD 46202, which is a member of the young open cluster NGC 2244, was observed by the CoRoT satellite in October/November 2008 during a short run of 34 days. From the very high-precision light curve, we clearly detect beta Cep-like pulsation frequencies with amplitudes of ~0.1 mmag and below. A comparison with stellar models was performed using a chi^2 as a measure for the goodness-of-fit between the observed and theoretically computed frequencies. The physical parameters of our best-fitting models are compatible with the ones deduced spectroscopically. A core overshooting parameter alpha_ov = 0.10 +- 0.05 pressure scale height is required. None of the observed frequencies are theoretically excited with the input physics used in our study. More theoretical work is thus needed to overcome this shortcoming in how we understand the excitation mechanism of pulsation modes in such a massive star. A similar excitation problem has also been encountered for certain pulsation modes in beta Cep stars recently modelled asteroseismically.
  • We present results from the final six months of a survey to search for pulsations in white dwarfs and hot subdwarf stars with the Kepler spacecraft. Spectroscopic observations are used to separate the objects into accurate classes, and we explore the physical parameters of the subdwarf B (sdB) stars and white dwarfs in the sample. From the Kepler photometry and our spectroscopic data, we find that the sample contains 5 new pulsators of the V1093 Her type, one AM CVn type cataclysmic variable, and a number of other binary systems. This completes the survey for compact pulsators with Kepler. No V361 Hya type of short-period pulsating sdB stars were found in this half, leaving us with a total of one single multiperiodic V361 Hya and 13 V1093 Her pulsators for the full survey. Except for the sdB pulsators, no other clearly pulsating hot subdwarfs or white dwarfs were found, although a few low-amplitude candidates still remain. The most interesting targets discovered in this survey will be observed throughout the remainder of the Kepler Mission, providing the most long-term photometric datasets ever made on such compact, evolved stars. Asteroseismic investigations of these datasets will be invaluable in revealing the interior structure of these stars, and will boost our understanding of their evolutionary history.
  • OB stars are important constituents for the ecology of the Universe, and there are only a few studies on their pulsational properties detailed enough to provide important feedback on current evolutionary models. Our goal is to analyse and interpret the behaviour present in the CoRoT light curve of the B0.5 IV star HD 51756 observed during the second long run of the space mission, and to determine the fundamental stellar parameters from ground-based spectroscopy gathered with the CORALIE and HARPS instruments after checking for signs of variability and binarity, thus making a step further in mapping the top of the Beta Cep instability strip. We compare the newly obtained high-resolution spectra with synthetic spectra of late O-type and early B-type stars computed on a grid of stellar parameters. We match the results with evolutionary tracks to estimate stellar parameters. We use various time series analysis tools to explore the nature of the variations present in the light curve. Additional calculations are carried out based on distance and historical position measurements of the components to impose constraints on the binary orbit. We find that HD 51756 is a wide binary with both a slow (v sin i \approx 28 km s^-1) and a fast (v sin i \approx 170 km s^-1) early-B rotator whose atmospheric parameters are similar (T_eff \approx 30000 K and log g \approx 3.75). We are unable to detect pulsation in any of the components, and we interpret the harmonic structure in the frequency spectrum as sign of rotational modulation, which is compatible with the observed and deduced stellar parameters of both components. The non-detection of pulsation modes provides a feedback on the theoretical treatment, given that non-adiabatic computations applied to appropriate stellar models predict the excitation of both pressure and gravity modes for the fundamental parameters of this star.
  • KPD 1930+2752 is a short-period pulsating subdwarf B (sdB) star. It is also an ellipsoidal variable with a known binary period just over two hours. The companion is most likely a white dwarf and the total mass of the system is close to the Chandresakhar limit. In this paper we report the results of Whole Earth Telescope (WET) photometric observations during 2003 and a smaller multisite campaign from 2002. From 355 hours of WET data, we detect 68 pulsation frequencies and suggest an additional 13 frequencies within a crowded and complex temporal spectrum between 3065 and 6343 $\mu$Hz (periods between 326 and 157 s). We examine pulsation properties including phase and amplitude stability in an attempt to understand the nature of the pulsation mechanism. We examine a stochastic mechanism by comparing amplitude variations with simulated stochastic data. We also use the binary nature of KPD 1930+2752 for identifying pulsation modes via multiplet structure and a tidally-induced pulsation geometry. Our results indicate a complicated pulsation structure that includes short-period ($\approx 16$ h) amplitude variability, rotationally split modes, tidally-induced modes, and some pulsations which are geometrically limited on the sdB star.
  • We present results from the first two quarters of a survey to search for pulsations in compact stellar objects with the Kepler spacecraft. The survey sample and the various methods applied in its compilation are described, and spectroscopic observations are presented to separate the objects into accurate classes. From the Kepler photometry we clearly identify nine compact pulsators, and a number of interesting binary stars. Of the pulsators, one shows the strong, rapid pulsations typical for a V361 Hya type sdB variable (sdBV), seven show long-period pulsations characteristic of V1093 Her type sdBVs, and one shows low-amplitude pulsations with both short and long periods. We derive effective temperatures and surface gravities for all the subdwarf B stars in the sample and demonstrate that below the boundary region where hybrid sdB pulsators are found, all our targets are pulsating. For the stars hotter than this boundary temperature a low fraction of strong pulsators (<10 per cent) is confirmed. Interestingly, the short-period pulsator also shows a low-amplitude mode in the long-period region, and several of the V1093 Her pulsators show low amplitude modes in the short-period region, indicating that hybrid behaviour may be common in these stars, also outside the boundary temperature region where hybrid pulsators have hitherto been found.
  • 2M1938+4603 (KIC 9472174) displays a spectacular light curve dominated by a strong reflection effect and rather shallow, grazing eclipses. The orbital period is 0.126 days, the second longest period yet found for an eclipsing sdB+dM, but still close to the minimum 0.1-d period among such systems. The phase-folded light curve was used to detrend the orbital effects from the dataset, and the resulting amplitude spectrum shows a rich collection of pulsation peaks spanning frequencies from ~50 to 4500 uHz. The presence of a complex pulsation spectrum in both the p-mode and the g-mode regions has never been seen before in a compact pulsator. Eclipsing sdB+dM stars are very rare, with only seven systems known and only one with a pulsating primary. Pulsating stars in eclipsing binaries are especially important since they permit masses derived from seismological model fits to be cross checked with orbital mass constraints. We present a first analysis of this star based on the Kepler 9.7-day commissioning light curve and extensive ground-based photometry and spectroscopy that allow us to set useful bounds on the system parameters. We derive a radial-velocity amplitude K_1 = 65.7 +/- 0.6 km/s, inclination angle i = 69.45 +/- 0.20 degrees, and find that the masses of the components are M_1 = 0.48 +/- 0.03 and M_2 = 0.12 +/- 0.01 solar masses.
  • Using the CoRoT space based photometry of the O-type binary HD46149, stellar atmospheric effects related to rotation can be separated from pulsations, because they leave distinct signatures in the light curve. This offers the possibility of characterising and exploiting any pulsations seismologically. Combining high-quality space based photometry, multi-wavelength photometry, spectroscopy and constraints imposed by binarity and cluster membership, the detected pulsations in HD46149 are analyzed and compared with those for a grid of stellar evolutionary models in a proof-of-concept approach. We present evidence of solar-like oscillations in a massive O-type star, and show that the observed frequency range and spacings are compatible with theoretical predictions. Thus, we unlock and confirm the strong potential of this seismically unexplored region in the HR diagram.
  • We aim to interpret the photometric and spectroscopic variability of the luminous blue variable supergiant HD\,50064 ($V=8.21$).CoRoT space photometry and follow-up high-resolution spectroscopy, with a time base of 137\,d and 169\,d, respectively, was gathered, analysed and interpreted using standard time series analysis and light curve modelling methods as well as spectral line diagnostics.The space photometry reveals one period of 37\,d, which undergoes a sudden amplitude change with a factor 1.6. The pulsation period is confirmed in the spectroscopy, which additionally reveals metal line radial velocity values differing by $\sim 30\,$km\,s$^{-1}$ depending on the spectral line and on the epoch. We estimate \teff$\sim$13\,500\,K, \logg$\sim$1.5 from the equivalent width of Si lines. The Balmer lines reveal that the star undergoes episodes of changing mass loss on a time scale similar to the changes in the photometric and spectroscopic variability, with an average value of $\log\dot{\rm M}\simeq-5$ (in M$_\odot$\,yr$^{-1}$). We tentatively interpret the 37\,d period as due to a strange mode oscillation.
  • We present multi-colour time-series CCD photometry of the solar-age galactic open cluster M67 (NGC 2682). About 3600 frames spread over 28 nights were obtained with the 1.5 m Russian-Turkish and 1.2 m Mercator telescopes. High-precision observations of the close binary stars AH Cnc, EV Cnc, ES Cnc, the $\delta$ Scuti type systems EX Cnc and EW Cnc, and some long-period variables belonging to M67 are presented. Three full multi-colour light curves of the overcontact binary AH Cnc were obtained during three observing seasons. Likewise we gathered three light curves of EV Cnc, an EB-type binary, and two light curves of ES Cnc, a blue straggler binary. Parts of the light change of long-term variables S1024, S1040, S1045, S1063, S1242, and S1264 are obtained. Period variation analysis of AH Cnc, EV Cnc, and ES Cnc were done using all times of mid-eclipse available in the literature and those obtained in this study. In addition, we analyzed multi-colour light curves of the close binaries and also determined new frequencies for the $\delta$ Scuti systems. The physical parameters of the close binary stars were determined with simultaneous solutions of multi-colour light and radial velocity curves. Finally we determined the distance of M67 as 857(33) pc via binary star parameters, which is consistent with an independent method from earlier studies.
  • PG 1159-035, a pre-white dwarf with T_eff=140,000 K, is the prototype of both two classes: the PG1159 spectroscopic class and the DOV pulsating class. Previous studies of PG 1159-035 photometric data obtained with the Whole Earth Telescope (WET) showed a rich frequency spectrum allowing the identification of 122 pulsation modes. In this work, we used all available WET photometric data from 1983, 1985, 1989, 1993 and 2002 to identify the pulsation periods and identified 76 additional pulsation modes, increasing to 198 the number of known pulsation modes in PG 1159-035, the largest number of modes detected in any star besides the Sun. From the period spacing we estimated a mass M = 0.59 +/- 0.02 solar masses for PG 1159-035, with the uncertainty dominated by the models, not the observation. Deviations in the regular period spacing suggest that some of the pulsation modes are trapped, even though the star is a pre-white dwarf and the gravitational settling is ongoing. The position of the transition zone that causes the mode trapping was calculated at r_c = 0.83 +/- 0.05 stellar radius. From the multiplet splitting, we calculated the rotational period P_rot = 1.3920 +/- 0.0008 days and an upper limit for the magnetic field, B < 2000 G. The total power of the pulsation modes at the stellar surface changed less than 30% for l=1 modes and less than 50% for l=2 modes. We find no evidence of linear combinations between the 198 pulsation mode frequencies. PG 1159-035 models have not significative convection zones, supporting the hypothesis that nonlinearity arises in the convection zones in cooler pulsating white dwarf stars.
  • The formation of subdwarf B (sdB) stars is not well understood within the current framework of stellar single and binary evolution. In this study, we focus on the formation and evolution of the pulsating sdB star in the very short-period eclipsing binary PG1336-018. We aim at refining the formation scenario of this unique system, so that it can be confronted with observations. We probe the stellar structure of the progenitors of sdB stars in short-period binaries using detailed stellar evolution calculations. Applying this to PG1336-018 we reconstruct the common-envelope phase during which the sdB star was formed. The results are interpreted in terms of the standard common-envelope formalism (the alpha-formalism) based on the energy equation, and an alternative description (the gamma-formalism) using the angular momentum equation. We find that if the common-envelope evolution is described by the alpha-formalism, the sdB progenitor most likely experienced a helium flash. We then expect the sdB mass to be between 0.39 and 0.48 Msun, and the sdB progenitor initial mass to be below ~2 Msun. However, the results for the gamma-formalism are less restrictive, and a broader sdB mass range (0.3 - 0.8 Msun) is possible in this case. Future seismic mass determination will give strong constraints on the formation of PG1336-018 and, in particular, on the CE phase.
  • We present an unbiased orbit solution and mass determination of the components of the eclipsing binary NY Vir as a critical test for the formation scenarios of subdwarf B stars. We obtained high-resolution time series VLT/UVES spectra and high-speed multicolour VLT/ULTRACAM photometric observations of NY Vir, a rapidly pulsating subdwarf B star in a short period eclipsing binary. Combining the radial velocity curve obtained from the VLT/UVES spectra with the VLT/ULTRACAM multicolour lightcurves, we determined numerical orbital solutions for this eclipsing binary. Due to the large number of free parameters and their strong correlations, no unique solution could be found, only families of solutions. We present three solutions of equal statistical significance, two of which are compatible with the primary having gone through a core He-flash and a common-envelope phase described by the $\alpha$-formalism. These two models have an sdB primary of 0.466 \msol and 0.389 \msol, respectively. Finally, we report the detection of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for NY Vir.
  • PG 0014+067 is one of the most promising pulsating subdwarf B stars for seismic analysis, as it has a rich pulsation spectrum. The richness of its pulsations, however, poses a fundamental challenge to understanding the pulsations of these stars, as the mode density is too complex to be explained only with radial and nonradial low degree (l < 3) p-modes without rotational splittings. One proposed solution, for the case of PG 0014+067 in particular, assigns some modes with high degree (l=3). On the other hand, theoretical models of sdB stars suggest that they may retain rapidly rotating cores, and so the high mode density may result from the presence of a few rotationally-split triplet (l=1), quintuplet (l=2) modes, along with radial (l=0) p-modes. To examine alternative theoretical models for these stars, we need better frequency resolution and denser longitude coverage. Therefore, we observed this star with the Whole Earth Telescope for two weeks in October 2004. In this paper we report the results of Whole Earth Telescope observations of the pulsating subdwarf B star PG 0014+067. We find that the frequencies seen in PG 0014+067 do not appear to fit any theoretical model currently available; however, we find a simple empirical relation that is able to match all of the well-determined frequencies in this star.