• The choice of a reflective optical coating or filter material has to be adapted to the intended field of application. This is mainly determined by the required photon energy range or by the required reflection angle. Among various materials, nickel and rhodium are standard materials used as reflective coatings for synchrotron mirrors. Conversely, Aluminum is one of the most commonly used materials for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray filters. However, both of these types of optics are subject to carbon contamination, being increasingly problematic for the operation of the high-performance free electron laser (FEL) and synchrotron beamlines. For this reason, an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source has been used in conjunction with N2/O2/H2 and N2/H2 feedstock gas plasmas. Results from the chemical surface analysis of the above materials before and after plasma treatment using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are reported. We conclude that a favorable combination of an N2/H2 plasma feedstock gas mixture leads to the best chemical surface preservation of Ni, Rh, and Al while removing the carbon contaminations. However, this feedstock gas mixture does not remove C contaminations as rapidly as, e.g., a N2/O2/H2 plasma which induces the surface formation of NiO and NiOOH in Ni and RhOOH in Rh foils. As an applied case, we demonstrate the successful carbon removal from ultrathin Al filters previously used at the FERMI FEL1 using a N2/H2 plasma.
  • XUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) produce short wavelength pulses with high intensity, ultrashort duration, well-defined polarization and transverse coherence, and have been utilised for many experiments previously possible at long wavelengths only: multiphoton ionization, pumping an atomic laser, and four-wave mixing spectroscopy. However one important optical technique, coherent control, has not yet been demonstrated, because Self- Amplified Spontaneous Emission FELs have limited longitudinal coherence. Single-colour pulses from the FERMI seeded FEL are longitudinally coherent, and two-colour emission is predicted to be coherent. Here we demonstrate the phase correlation of two colours, and manipulate it to control an experiment. Light of wavelengths 63.0 and 31.5 nm ionized neon, and the asymmetry of the photoelectron angular distribution was controlled by adjusting the phase, with temporal resolution 3 attoseconds. This opens the door to new shortwavelength coherent control experiments with ultrahigh time resolution and chemical sensitivity.
  • X-ray mirrors with high focusing performances are in use in both mirror modules for X-ray telescopes and in synchrotron and FEL (Free Electron Laser) beamlines. A degradation of the focus sharpness arises in general from geometrical deformations and surface roughness, the former usually described by geometrical optics and the latter by physical optics. In general, technological developments are aimed at a very tight focusing, which requires the mirror profile to comply with the nominal shape as much as possible and to keep the roughness at a negligible level. However, a deliberate deformation of the mirror can be made to endow the focus with a desired size and distribution, via piezo actuators as done at the EIS-TIMEX beamline of FERMI@Elettra. The resulting profile can be characterized with a Long Trace Profilometer and correlated with the expected optical quality via a wavefront propagation code. However, if the roughness contribution can be neglected, the computation can be performed via a ray-tracing routine, and, under opportune assumptions, the focal spot profile (the Point Spread Function, PSF) can even be predicted analytically. The advantage of this approach is that the analytical relation can be reversed; i.e, from the desired PSF the required mirror profile can be computed easily, thereby avoiding the use of complex and time-consuming numerical codes. The method can also be suited in the case of spatially inhomogeneous beam intensities, as commonly experienced at Synchrotrons and FELs. In this work we expose the analytical method and the application to the beam shaping problem.
  • We present an experimental study of the electronic structure of MnSi. Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission and X-ray fluorescence we provide experimental evidence that MnSi has a mixed valence ground state. We show that self consistent LDA supercell calculations cannot replicate the XAS spectra of MnSi, while a good match is achieved within the atomic multiplet theory assuming a mixed valence ground state. We discuss the role of the electron-electron interactions in this compound and estimate that the valence fluctuations are suppressed by a factor of 2.5, which means that the Coulomb repulsion is not negligible.